Cover for No Agenda Show 1469: The Nurge
July 17th, 2022 • 3h 9m

1469: The Nurge

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0:00
Joe's fine, is gray. Adam curry Jhansi Devora
0:05
July 17 2022 And this is your award winning get my nation
0:09
media assassination episode 1469 This
0:12
is no agenda commemorating
0:15
climate victims and broadcasting live from the heart of the Texas
0:19
hill country here in FEMA Region number six in the morning,
0:21
everybody. I'm Adam curry
0:23
and from Northern Silicon Valley where I'm a city you asleep
0:27
watching the July tournament. We're terreno Fuji almost lost
0:32
today. I'm Jhansi Dvorak, Raglan Buzzkill.
0:36
Yes, and that was your Sumo Wrestling Report courtesy of
0:39
Jhansi Dvorak. People don't know that they don't know that they
0:45
don't know that you're a sumo wrestler Shimon
0:48
is definitely watching a couple of fat guys who are
0:51
intentionally fat, they actually take the weight off after they
0:54
quit the game. But they have to be intentionally effect because
0:57
of the nature of the game. So they had to have a lot of
0:59
weight. I mean, you can try the fast gear the fast move a little
1:03
thinner.
1:04
Why do you need to be so fat just because of the fewer the
1:06
pure bulk? So you can just slam into people and just use your
1:10
mass?
1:12
Yeah, well, two reasons. One, you don't want to be someone who
1:16
can be easily pushed around. This is a little round ring.
1:21
It's true. And you get pushed out easily if you're go head to
1:25
head with a big fat guy. Yeah, but it's interesting. This, the
1:30
NHK has done a very good job on some of the last few years of
1:35
going into a lot of the details Asuma which makes it actually
1:37
even more interesting how these guys come up in the message to
1:42
literally just make themselves as fat as they can. Can like an
1:47
actor might do in a movie, and in for there. And they only last
1:52
in the game maybe five to 10 years, maybe at the most. So
1:57
some guys that stick around for some length of time. They're
1:59
more naturally big. And it's just fascinating to watch.
2:04
There's lots of skill to it. But I've always thought Americans
2:08
would love this because it's like, who doesn't
2:13
love fat guy? You know if they could combine sumo wrestling
2:16
with hot dog eating. I think we'd have a winning formula for
2:19
America. I
2:19
think I think American football guards and tackles in the
2:24
American Football League, the sumo comm Sumos if they you know
2:30
if they wanted to, I would like to see it. I like to see sumo go
2:34
against the best guard in the NFL and see what happens. As an
2:38
exhibition,
2:39
Sumo football is getting better. I mean, we're creating an entire
2:43
This is our exit strategy. Finally sumo voted for by Yeah,
2:46
that's it, everybody, Sumo football for Adam and John.
2:50
Beautiful. I'm writing it down for my book of ideas. You know,
2:56
for when I retire, Sumo football,
2:58
that you can sell that book, there's your exit strategy.
3:02
So heads are bowed all across the EU. Now a very, very solemn
3:07
day, yesterday, led in these in this in this Day of Mourning is
3:16
our very own France Timmermans. My friend who never returns my
3:21
calls anymore. He used to be a Bilderberger with a Dutch queen.
3:25
And then he went deep into politics. And now he is the
3:29
European Union Green Deal czar. And he I think we need to listen
3:36
to him because he has something very important to say we all
3:39
commemorate right now, the loss of life, due to erratic weather
3:44
patterns, horrible weather patterns. In Europe, it's a year
3:47
ago that more than 220 people lost their lives because of the
3:51
floods in Germany and Belgium. Also hear people have lost their
3:55
lives and the climate crisis tornado, I think five people
3:59
were killed also in Czechia. There are deaths almost on a
4:03
daily basis worldwide. And it is clear these erratic weather
4:08
patterns are a consequence of the climate crisis clear. And I
4:12
think it's time we,
4:15
by the way, I just got to stop our buddy France there. That
4:18
thing was caused by very bad policy for over 100 years. That
4:23
flood in Germany. It was not because of climate change, it
4:27
will end it's admitted they had to turn back and say well, yeah,
4:30
and I guess we've kind of
4:30
recruited an old floodplain that Dan pushed back by putting trees
4:35
here and there and doing all these things, which you have to
4:38
do they have to manage you have to manage your environment and
4:42
then you do just all of a sudden pull everything out of floods
4:44
and you blame climate change.
4:46
Exactly. In fact, you haven't little bit. Oh, no, it's too
4:51
long. But we had a whole series of clips even on NPR was always
4:54
the infrastructure was not good, but that doesn't matter because
4:57
France is still he's a mench. He's going to commemorate these
5:01
people, no matter
5:02
what you might have a mess up, never calls you back
5:05
climate crisis. And I think it's time we paid a bit more
5:11
attention to those victims. Yes. And I think it would be a good
5:15
idea to have at least one day in the year in Europe, yes. Where
5:19
we commemorate the victims of these horrible weather pattern,
5:23
horrible weather patterns sign the climate crisis
5:25
caused by the climate crud horrible weather patterns caused
5:28
by the we're now two steps removed.
5:31
Now a year ago, I mentioned more than 220 people died. Yes. And
5:35
sometimes it becomes clearer if you know one of these persons
5:40
and I want to mention a 15 year old girl called Rosa.
5:44
Okay, so I think there's something very subliminal he's
5:49
about to do here. So what he's saying is, you know, sometimes
5:51
it, it really doesn't hit home until it really hits you
5:54
personally, by the way, nothing, of course, yeah, I just feel bad
5:56
for the 200 people that died. Of course, I'm not a total ale. But
6:03
for purposes of entertainment. You know, it's better if you
6:07
make it personal. And then he says, Rosa, this is a very
6:11
typical Dutch Yiddish way of pronouncing a very Dutch Jewish
6:17
girl's name of Orissa. And I think he's doing this on
6:21
purpose, to bring it closer to some kind of Holocaust
6:25
proportions.
6:26
Otherwise pronounce it.
6:28
But OSA is it's
6:31
listed Jewish pronunciation,
6:33
Hausa it's, it's subtle, subtle, yeah, but it's for me, it's very
6:38
obvious that he's trying to, and also the net everything, it
6:42
just, it feels creepy.
6:44
And sometimes it becomes clearer, if you know one of
6:48
these persons. And I want to mention, a 15 year old girl
6:52
called Rosa Rosa, who is who was the daughter of one of my
6:58
colleagues in the European Commission who was on a climate
7:02
camp in the Belgian organic climate camp, and she was swept
7:06
away by finances, and she died. We as a family just celebrated
7:13
the 16th birthday of our daughter. And also I will never
7:16
be able to celebrate a 16th birthday. And it breaks my heart
7:20
to have to say this, but I believe that compels us to pay
7:24
attention to all these people who have lost their lives
7:27
because of this erratic weather, which is a consequence of
7:30
climate change. So I hope we can agree I will propose it to the
7:34
ministers today to have a memorial day for the victims of
7:37
the climate crisis.
7:38
By the way, he says 16 year old girl and then later says she
7:41
never got to celebrate her 16th birthday. And she is I mean, she
7:45
was I mean that has incubator kids written all over it.
7:50
transparently, the
7:51
climate camp is one thing, but whatever happened to the idea
7:54
that claim is not whether, wow, where have you been? For that
7:58
five
7:58
years now that went out the window, when it was snowing, and
8:02
it was cold, and we had we had a little bit of that snap? That's
8:07
when everyone ever Of course everyone who doesn't believe it
8:10
would jump up and say see that's a climate change. So they had to
8:13
parry that and the only thing they could do was and is that
8:15
powerful?
8:17
There was never going to be another any snow at all because
8:20
it was never going to happen. And this is no one worse than
8:24
ever.
8:24
No kids would never happen to that kids would not see snow
8:27
after the year 2000 Except in snow globes. Yeah, that was that
8:32
was put now. So that so Britain just is gone. Britain just
8:38
declared a national emergency record breaking heat. Now,
8:45
I've got a heat clip.
8:48
He's got a heat clip. Okay, what do you see? I see. The title
8:54
alone makes me jittery.
8:55
The National Weather Service in the United Kingdom has issued
8:58
its first ever extreme heat warning. As Villa marks reports,
9:02
temperatures are expected to top 100 degrees in many parts of the
9:06
country in the coming days.
9:08
The British Meteorological Office is highest ever warning
9:10
covers major cities including London, Manchester and York on
9:14
Monday and Tuesday next week and indicates the risk to life and
9:16
that daily routines will need to change. railway lines will
9:20
likely face speed restrictions, medical appointments and some
9:22
hospitals will be canceled and certain schools will close
9:24
early. Automobile organizations have warned drivers to stay off
9:28
roads that may melt while cars face overheating. top government
9:31
officials have met Friday to discuss their response. Wow,
9:35
that
9:35
guy sounds really they gotta we need a response to 100 roads are
9:39
gonna melt. They're going to of course,
9:43
it gets to be 115 120 in Arizona routinely day after day, month
9:48
after month hard
9:50
dock in the highway. Roads are melted their tires are melted
9:54
into the road, John.
9:55
He said this is gonna maybe go over 100 degrees. Okay 100
9:59
You're not out Nuri centigrade, that would be bad. That would be
10:03
roasty. That would melt the road, but they're gonna go oh, i
10:07
By the way went, Mimi and I went to England. Years ago during
10:11
their last heatwave.
10:13
They should have said your blood will clot. See, this is what
10:16
they should do. Oh,
10:18
just an opportunity back to the story. So and it was so bad then
10:23
it was over 100 It was in Paris in London. That entire Hyde Park
10:28
was was Bolton Park was the grass was all dead. I don't
10:34
think it's even gotten that bad with this heatwave. I don't
10:36
think it's that bad. It was dead. It was all brown. It was a
10:39
Blue Bay, California very, you know, welcome dead,
10:41
dead and dead and soulless. Yes, exactly. Like so.
10:46
So this clip is, is based on the melting roads. You got to get
10:52
your cars off the road because you're gonna sink into the
10:54
melting asphalt. This has never happened. Where does it roads
10:59
melting? We had melt in Palm Springs in all melt in Arizona,
11:03
not melting in the hill country.
11:05
What are they talking about?
11:07
Maybe? Maybe they have dumb tar? I don't know. It doesn't make
11:10
any sense.
11:11
Just pure tar road. It'd be melting all the time.
11:18
I have. Oh, wait, do you have a second clip here?
11:21
I do have the I gotta be as judicious. A kicker.
11:25
The extreme heats originated in Northern Africa and has been
11:27
fueled by growing wildfires in France, Spain and Portugal
11:31
are worse the climate change?
11:33
Well, this was the end of that report. This is what's causing
11:36
the heatwave in England. Yeah. When is this ever happened? You
11:42
have fires in Portugal and France? Yeah. And it's causing a
11:45
heatwave in England. Are you kidding me? Blaming the heatwave
11:51
and listen to this place six seconds again.
11:56
It's pretty funny.
11:57
The extreme heat is originated in Northern Africa and has been
12:00
fueled by growing wildfires in France, Spain and Portugal.
12:03
Okay, now,
12:04
let me turn this back. The extreme heat originated. Okay,
12:08
so Northern
12:09
Africa, maybe Morocco. It just went bomb man were warm war. And
12:14
then we and they went over the ocean.
12:18
Though the military Mediterranean,
12:20
sorry. And then up through Portugal and Spain and then
12:25
getting that hop that you know, it hopped the channel? I mean,
12:28
where did where did it go? No, because this is the same
12:32
everywhere. I mean, just give you some historical perspective
12:34
kind
12:35
of bullshit. Are they trying to pull a melt and the African
12:40
climate is affecting England?
12:42
Yes. This is this is climate change blather. And they've
12:46
learned very. John, this is not a this is not journalism. It's
12:51
not news. This is was it the BBC make otherwise NPR?
12:57
Yeah. And P. V? I think it was via the BBC.
13:01
You know what, I think that a lot of editors or writers have
13:03
new stories. They don't even check that just go well, it's
13:06
climate change. And they just put it in there. It's at this
13:09
point, it's just it's a fact. You know, it's like they were
13:12
very fine people. Roads are melting. The mouse is a dumb
13:17
idea. Nobody wants it. I mean, the debt by the way, no liar.
13:21
That's why I'm saying that's these, you will go to your grave
13:25
with that. And I will stand on your grave and say, it's not
13:29
true. It's not true.
13:31
Oh, by the way, by the time that all happens, yeah, the mouse
13:35
would be dead anyway.
13:38
Say he was right. right all along. So I have a little bit of
13:42
historical perspective. In 1972. We moved to the Netherlands. And
13:46
I remember the summer 70 234 Probably through 676. Seven, it
13:52
may be longer, and they were hot. It was hot outside and it
13:55
was really beautiful. I remembered it was nice. The
13:58
spring was nice. And I was like now Holland's not too bad. In
14:01
the 90s He got shit. It was like a like a carwash, perpetual
14:06
carwash. And even the summers it was just, you know, wet and gray
14:11
and, and nasty. And they predicted Of course, in the 70s
14:14
Oh, global cooling is coming and you know, to some degree it
14:17
cooled down a bit. And that you know, so we went through the the
14:20
solar maximum, the solar minimum, we've gone up and down
14:23
this 11 Year 11 year cycles
14:26
to 22 real cycle 2211 Yeah,
14:30
right. Right. And I learned about that, because when I was
14:33
15, I was you know, jacking up my CB radio using a sideband and
14:40
cutting a diode so you could get into the 28 megahertz frequency.
14:45
And you know, and I just needed a half half wave antenna on the
14:49
roof and I could talk to Ohio and that was because of the Sun
14:52
activity. So I learned a lot about this, but I could also
14:55
feel the difference later when I went back to visit and it really
14:59
started Did becoming nice again when we went back to Amsterdam.
15:04
So turn of the century turn of the millennium, and it started
15:09
getting warmer. Now, back in the day when I was in school and 72,
15:12
and we were sweating our balls off, we had something called
15:15
Tropen roaster. And the Tropen roaster was very simple. It's
15:20
like when it's really hot during the summer, we'll give you a
15:23
tropical schedule. That's what it means throw up a roaster. And
15:27
you come in a little earlier, you come in an hour earlier, and
15:30
then after lunch, everyone goes home. And that was normal. These
15:35
temperatures, I don't know, I'm just seeing record breaking. I
15:37
mean, I don't know. Seems like we had 100 degree days. And I
15:42
remember because I was still an American in thought and it
15:46
wasn't thinking centigrade or Celsius. And I remember those
15:49
100 100 degree days. Yeah, so it was just bull. And I and I don't
15:55
remember the road,
15:56
you know, like old farts like you'd bring it up. Shut up. Talk
16:01
to a kid. Let's bring a kid on 11 year old Ain't No.
16:06
I haven't ended show in the show mix of, of the kids screaming
16:11
about climate change. Let me say it's actually I have a couple
16:14
other things. Oh, yeah. One of the kids none of the kids. They
16:17
know what to do. They're being taught they're being taught
16:19
well, because you know, of course we have to fight this
16:21
evil that's melting the roads. And you have the roads don't get
16:25
you. We'll get you
16:26
Bay Area. Neighbors say some climate activists have crossed
16:29
the line as they tried to send a message about gas consumption.
16:33
They are letting the air out of SUV tires we
16:37
invest a lot of time Vacaville mom quando Ellis Walker has two
16:40
boys with autism. She and her husband also coach youth sports
16:44
focusing on kids with disabilities. She also works as
16:48
a registered nurse so between her job her kids, the kids on
16:51
her team and taking care of the disabled and she puts a lot of
16:55
mileage on her SUV. On Tuesday morning as she was driving to an
16:59
appointment. Her tire pressure sensor came on sensor on my tire
17:03
was on six whoa she packs a car and found the problem
17:07
my tire was
17:08
totally flat. I noticed the paper on my windshield.
17:15
The flyer says the climate activist has deflated the tire
17:18
because SUVs are bad for the environment. You're a gas
17:21
guzzler kills so
17:24
and I was just angry about that because my gas guzzler does not
17:28
kill
17:29
cuando says her SUV is a lifeline in her community. It
17:33
helped her transport special needs children to many sporting
17:36
events. Whether it's a person or group, it appears to removing
17:39
the tire valve cap and letting the air out in the middle of the
17:42
night. So that's how you do have anonymous climate bags that
17:45
started the vehicle tampering in Europe. And now it's spreading
17:49
to the US
17:50
the anonymous group called the tire extinguishers claimed
17:53
responsibility for the vehicle tampering they also target
17:56
electric SUVs because they say all SUVs are dangerous
18:01
now nice. Go Electric.
18:06
Yeah, that's funny. Well, you know and by the way, the real
18:09
tip is you take off the screw top and then you take one of
18:13
these little tools Yeah, you screw you actually take the
18:16
valve out. Yeah.
18:17
Now you're talking Johnny.
18:19
Hey, kid.
18:21
Did they tell you that in the meeting last night?
18:23
Yes when the meeting ends, but that's a good clip. I'm glad
18:27
you're fired. I didn't even know it was going on. I'm very I'm
18:29
twice a Bay Area report but I have a Germany report on climate
18:33
so I mean, keep up with what they're doing. They're there.
18:35
They're leading the way.
18:37
They're all in green New Deal rock and roll where the winners
18:40
Chancellor
18:40
all of Schultz says Germany's decision to reactivate coal and
18:44
oil fired power plants. Totally energy shortages because of the
18:48
war in Ukraine is only temporary. He says his
18:51
government remains committed to combating the climate crisis.
18:54
And he's insisting Germany remains committed to ending its
18:57
greenhouse gas emissions by 2045.
19:01
This is so good now. They usually go I do have one last
19:04
clip then. By the way.
19:06
Wait before you guys just say one thing about Germany. Yeah.
19:10
So Deutsche Bank is now modeling German households you know they
19:15
do that for you know to understand the consumer you
19:18
know, maybe price their inflation whatever they want to
19:20
do. They're modeling German households chopping wood to keep
19:24
warm this winter. Like well if we if we let them chop wood
19:30
everyone's going to be I think kind of okay
19:35
well, yes, good exercise. Yeah. Them logs.
19:39
Yeah. All right.
19:40
What's your next year? I want to make a warning I pre warning for
19:43
the rest of the show. I did get a bunch of Amy Goodman clips so
19:46
they're going to be on today's show. It's going to be
19:48
highlighted Okay. Well let's let's do a priority doing once
19:50
every few months. So
19:52
inbound All right, Amy clicked any government clip inbound is
19:55
good. We know it. So
19:56
let's go and use coal in the this. This would just Clip kills
20:00
me
20:01
in Brussels, the European Union has asked member states to curb
20:04
their use of natural gas and its fears that Russia might further
20:08
reduce supplies. The EU says nations that increase the
20:12
reliance on coal will be exempted from carbon emissions
20:15
reduction goals. Watch.
20:19
What? Oh, no. So, so Germany says, Hey, we got we got to fire
20:27
up some coal. Okay, you're exempt then. Yeah. Like
20:32
emergency use.
20:33
Now, you can meet your carbon goal in 2045. By burning coal.
20:38
That's great.
20:41
Wow, that's good.
20:43
And they get in and this stuff goes through and no one's you
20:46
know, even Amy, she does a straight faced.
20:49
Well, she, she's, you know, her religion is is science. You
20:53
know, I was I've had some thoughts about climate change
20:57
and other things happening. And when we first started following
21:01
when it started with climate gate, I mean, we're, this show
21:04
has been tracking the
21:07
lay the jungle. Yeah, I'm
21:09
was actually going to see if I could find it. I mean, it's so
21:11
long, it's no longer. It's no longer current. But yeah, so
21:16
we've been around so long that we had a jingle for it. To the
21:21
gate to the gate. When we first started seeing the reports of
21:26
the numbers being doctored, and IPCC had already been in in
21:31
operation for a long time until until it kind of crossed our
21:34
radar. It was a big scandal. And people should go back and read
21:38
it and you can massive scandal confined the original documents
21:41
and the massive scandal. It's been covered up and they've
21:43
said, Oh, no, this is normal. We change these things as
21:46
scientists and I mean, what else was the bullcrap and explanation
21:51
they had for doctoring the numbers? Do you remember
21:56
that? You know, I don't remember now. But it was like they were
21:59
first day. It was a scandal of the scandal existed and it was
22:03
played up by the media for a while and then somebody put the
22:05
kibosh on it. Yeah. And then then they started making up
22:09
rules. Well, you know, we had to change these because there's
22:12
variables. So this numbers it should have been and man,
22:16
that happened before Al Gore's movie came out.
22:19
was after? No, I'm pretty sure it was after okay,
22:23
even better. It was it was an epic scandal, and no one talks
22:29
about it anymore. Now, but what we talked about at the time was
22:32
the origins of this, which of course, we've seen the same
22:35
could some of the very same climate change people in the
22:40
early 70s. Say, we're going to have an ice age, he was going to
22:44
be global cooling, we were all going to die and frozen in the
22:46
ice. So first of all, we were really happy because we liked
22:49
the heat better than the cold. I think we're universal on that.
22:54
But it really stems from The Population Bomb people. That's
22:59
and I think that's really the we may not even have such a thing
23:04
as left or right politicians. Maybe it's just politicians who
23:07
want less people and politicians who want more people. Does that
23:12
make any sense?
23:14
Well, politicians want more people saying give cheap labor?
23:18
Well, no, I felt at a fundamental basis. Forget about
23:21
forget economy, everything Georgia Guidestones, you know,
23:24
500 million on Earth. I mean, how many times do we have to
23:27
think about what they really want is less people and they're
23:31
always saying vaccines get your less people and they have all
23:34
kinds of explanations for it. It just feels like that's that's
23:37
the that's that's the binary here. You know, religious people
23:41
they want to go forth multiply. And the globalist typically,
23:47
yeah, we got to keep you just barely alive to do work for.
23:51
Yeah, exactly. Exactly.
23:54
So I'm looking at this chart here, which is the world
23:57
population by a year it's going it's really I mean, slowing down
24:00
yearly, slowing down, yearly change back in 2004, is 1.25%
24:06
growth a year. And in fact, I can go back to just thinking
24:10
back to this thing goes back to the year 5000. It goes to 5000
24:16
BC, when there were five, 5 million people. And then at
24:21
around zero BC, there was about 190 million it went from there.
24:25
And then when the changes started, when they could
24:28
actually track it accurately. In 1951. It was 1.88% growth. And
24:34
it continued to increase until around 1970 when that book came
24:39
out. And it seems as though
24:42
the Population Bomb. Yeah,
24:45
it grew. It was at a 2.09% yearly change. And from that
24:48
point on from about the 70s. It went to 1.94 than 1.89. And it's
24:54
never it's never gone back up. It's been going down ever since
24:58
right to today. And right now the gross which was a lot of
25:03
numbers here.
25:04
This, of course, is when we introduced childhood vaccines,
25:08
processed food.
25:14
I'm sorry, it's true, but still in 1970, find the right number
25:18
here. In 1970, we had about 3.6 million and now we got 7.7. So,
25:24
you know, it adds up. Compound Interest makes a difference, you
25:27
make your rich, so rich and human resources. In 2019, we had
25:32
7.7 billion, and now we're at 7.79. But the growth rate has
25:38
gone from, like I said, almost 2% and 9070 to 1.05%. And this
25:43
fit, falling and falling. But the other trend that has to be
25:46
noted is that the urban population has been growing like
25:51
crazy, of course, and that began in it crossed over to over 50%.
25:57
And when you when you say urban, you mean cities, not cities,
26:01
cities, not the code for urban, which is black Americans.
26:05
So in 1951, the urban population city growth was 30%. And it has
26:12
gone up and up and up. And it is no, it's never really gone in
26:15
reversed. It's gone up and up and looking at all the numbers.
26:19
There's not one moment where it's gone down a notch. And now
26:23
it's up to 50 is went from 30%. Now it's 56%. And it's just
26:28
keeps growing and growing and growing. And the but it doesn't
26:32
mean you have to say well, I'm moving to the city, or there's
26:35
no farmers anymore. No, no, guys, that's still that's
26:40
growing too, by
26:41
the way. They're succeeding and killing us.
26:44
They want to Yes, but the point is, is that if you got this
26:50
right now the urban population 4.3 billion and there's an
26:54
aurora, no total population is 7.7. So there's plenty of people
26:58
not in the cities, it just so happens that they're
27:01
concentrating in the cities.
27:04
There's lots of room is what you're saying.
27:07
Yeah, there's plenty of room. Plenty more room if it was gonna
27:09
move to the city. Yeah. Okay, but so but I, so they this is
27:17
slowing down at natural isn't natural for now. And I don't
27:20
believe it has anything to do with anything. Do you accept? I
27:23
mean, I think it is. I mean, it's possible that it's not
27:26
helping, they can't slow it down. They can't they can't see
27:29
the growth is going on until it gets to about the figures going
27:33
to stop at a 10 billion.
27:37
Well, all I know is these people are real. I think probably
27:44
through what's his name brand who ran the well, that brand,
27:47
Stewart Brand.
27:48
Stewart Brand brands. That's right. He was one of the well
27:51
guess he didn't run the well. No, but I'm sure he took credit
27:55
for it. But now, he was
27:58
one of the Population Bomb guys. And you know, he was close with,
28:01
you know, he's around Silicon Valley. And I don't know, I feel
28:04
like that kind of seeped in a bit. To the conscience, and it's
28:08
just
28:10
been kind of population control. It's all around Stanford,
28:13
Stanford was where it came out of. So that's all Silicon Valley
28:17
right in the center.
28:18
Right? What do you mean Stanford, Stanford are the were
28:19
The Population Bomb people? Yeah, Ehrlich. That's right, for
28:24
a guy Ehrlich and brand brand wrote that book with Ehrlich.
28:27
They wrote it together.
28:30
I think I look.
28:31
I'm pretty sure be shocked if he did. Yeah, I'm pretty sure he
28:33
did. I
28:34
think that brand was the whole earth guy.
28:36
Yeah, no, but I believe that he wrote wiz Ehrlich. I think you
28:43
should check it out. Check it out. Very easy to figure but if
28:45
I just look at the news stories we talk about we have climate
28:48
change, clearly meant to kill people, not the climate change,
28:52
but the measures they're putting in place. I look at the food.
28:56
Now Population Bomb is a 1968 book written by Stanford
29:00
University Professor Paul Ehrlich and his wife now and
29:04
then I'm mistaken. Maybe he wrote a different book with him.
29:07
I don't think so.
29:12
Brand was not a brand was was associated with Ken Keyes he and
29:16
the goofballs he wasn't associate with a Stanford.
29:19
That's
29:19
right. That's a great band name Ken kisi and the goofballs. Like
29:27
that. Anyway, so climate change, it's ultimately it's about
29:34
removing people. Vaccines, I mean, I got my thoughts, but I'm
29:40
like, Okay, pretty much removing people. Roe v. Wade. This is Roe
29:45
v. Wade is not just a US story. This is playing everywhere, the
29:48
Netherlands, the UK, France.
29:51
I mean, did you find that peculiar?
29:53
No, this is exactly the point. This is what I'm trying to say.
29:57
Bless people everywhere, not just America. Georgia
30:00
Guidestones and you're and and
30:04
no you want less people in Europe but let's bring in more
30:07
immigrants. What's the point of that?
30:11
Well, you're just moving them from one to the other. I mean,
30:13
you're gonna kill them no matter what that's that's a whole
30:16
nother thing. That's to make the pot the masses, you know, a
30:20
mixture of brown and the true white supremacist the real ones
30:24
like the royal families in the elite. They're the ones that's
30:28
like Queen Ursula, so no European leader has kids almost
30:32
Margarita doesn't. McCrone doesn't know Boris Johnson
30:37
doesn't really catch a good point. You know, there's a lot
30:40
of a lot of leaders of the of those Queens the last one well,
30:45
but here's here's what's happening. And I wrote and it
30:48
just all kind of came together in my head the other day, the
30:50
queen, Queen Ursula, she has eight perfect beautiful German
30:57
children blond hair blue eyes, and that is celebrated see is
31:01
their movie. So I think we're dealing with you know, people.
31:07
Planned Parenthood started as a eugenicist organization. Maybe
31:12
it never stopped.
31:13
No, it didn't. It started as a birth control organization. It
31:18
was forever you different American from okay. I mean, you
31:24
can just get into an argument on the show about this but as far
31:26
as I'm concerned, Planned Parenthood started off as a
31:30
birth control organization which is not a you're not was not
31:34
associated with the Genesis them but you Genesis which was was
31:38
kind of the Eugenics Okay, let me give you a little background
31:42
The way I see it you Genesis movement began in the United
31:45
States. Yeah, in the 20s. Yes. And it was a cool thing it was
31:49
considered all that's cool, because it's makes nothing but
31:51
sense that we should breed ourselves to be better be
31:53
fact I think it may have had may have influenced Hitler and the
31:58
Nazis.
32:00
It totally influenced Hitler's and the Nazis and that's what
32:03
ruined it. Not that it was was a good idea, personally, but it
32:08
kind of the trend in the United States was all of a sudden oops,
32:11
we can't do it. We can't do that because Hitler did it. And he's
32:14
ruined it for everybody. And and the dentists become an
32:17
underground thing. If is, if it existed on I say Planned
32:21
Parenthood might now be a eugenicist organization. But I
32:25
did not begin that with no evidence.
32:28
I'll agree with you on the technicality. Margaret Sanger,
32:31
however, was a huge Genesis, and she was proud of it during that
32:34
period when it was it became a it's a great idea.
32:38
You were requesting that too, but but I will, I'll put that in
32:43
abeyance. But I question that. I think that isn't that that's a
32:46
desert rewrite of history.
32:47
What's interesting is that that is now accepted in in leftist
32:51
media. I hear all the time. Well, well, we all know it
32:53
playing out. Margaret Sanger is problematic, but Planned
32:56
Parenthood is really good. And I totally agree with you that
32:58
Planned Parenthood is now probably part of some eugenicist
33:02
agenda. Here's the thing that I discovered yesterday that blew
33:05
me away. Charles dark Darwin, The Origin of Species, would you
33:10
say that to some degree the science of of human kind, though
33:16
we're the opposite of evolution. Is this is this work by by
33:21
Darwin? No. Which one was? I thought natural selection. I
33:26
thought that was his whole theory.
33:28
Yeah, well, that's evolution.
33:30
But the what did I say wrong?
33:33
You said that Darwin was the antithesis of evolution.
33:38
No, I meant creation. I'm sorry. Yes. Thank you for correcting
33:41
me, the the antithesis of the creation, creation theory,
33:44
theory, religion, really creationism. So do you know the
33:48
original title of the book or the work whatever it's called
33:51
the The Origin of Species by means of sets of natural
33:55
selection? Because I didn't know this. And it's right there on
33:58
Wikipedia. The full title? Yeah.
34:02
Yeah. It's something that kind of alludes to creationism.
34:06
No, the here it is. I'm looking at the scan of the cover the
34:09
Origin of Species by means of natural selection, or the
34:13
preservation of Favoured Races in the struggle for life.
34:17
Oh.
34:21
I saw that. I'm like,
34:24
Yes, I'm, yeah, you're right.
34:26
Ah, it's just one of those things you like what is going
34:30
on?
34:31
Yeah, but this again, I will have to say that this is a this
34:35
is situational ethics. I mean, during different periods of
34:39
time, people had certain ways of seeing things. Sure. And it was
34:42
just it was what you were raised. And this is what were
34:44
you doing now? We're just reprogramming kids to think a
34:47
different way they could have been, if things had been
34:50
different. We could be programming kids to think the
34:52
exact same thing that they were thinking back in the 1800s, or
34:56
the 1700s, or the 1600s. And that's why I'm very adverse to
35:02
people. Reverse Engineering today's thinking to the past. I
35:08
think it's unfair. Okay, that's one of the reasons I think that
35:11
trying to rename this as a bunch of clips I got from Amy trying
35:16
to rename the Webb telescope the new James Webb telescope to
35:21
something else because James Webb was a anti gay
35:26
Yeah, this this has been going on for a while they actually
35:29
tried to change the name in Congress. I think there was a
35:32
bill to change it and it didn't didn't go anywhere.
35:37
I have Eclipse, okay. If you want to hear ya know, hello,
35:41
hello, of course. So let's go with Webb telescope plus LGN tq.
35:49
Democracy Now. This
35:51
week, NASA released the first images from its new flagship
35:55
James Webb Space Telescope, the JW S T, revealing an
35:59
unprecedented view of the cosmos from galaxies that formed just a
36:03
few 100 million years after the Big Bang to the birth of stars
36:07
and vast nebulas of gas and dust. The telescope is named
36:11
after Joe led NASA during the 60s and the run up to the Apollo
36:15
moon landings earlier this year, NASA Administrator Bill Nelson
36:18
rejected a petition signed by over 1200 astronomers and
36:22
astrophysicists demanding a change to the telescopes name
36:26
and it's new revelations about how web helped to purge NASA
36:29
LGBTQ plus workers as part of federal policy.
36:34
As part of federal policy, you help her federal policy to purge
36:40
and this is the Truman administration that started the
36:43
federal policy. Hello, Democrats just want to mention that to you
36:47
know, Congress I did.
36:50
The second clip is the NASA versus the gays clip. And I want
36:53
to preface it with this comment about the woman who comes on
36:57
this is what would have been termed a lipstick lesbian comes
37:02
years ago, comes on
37:05
now but we still understand the context. Thank you. And she's
37:09
on and she and she has her pronouns on this, which has her
37:12
name
37:13
with democracy now puts pronouns on the screen as a lower third.
37:18
Yeah. Oh, no. Yes.
37:22
Oh, everyone needs to do that. Okay, newsflash, every single
37:26
news program everyone needs to put the pronouns in the lower
37:30
third
37:33
that's great. Oh, hers are they them? Oh, she's a lipstick
37:37
lesbian. Why can't she wait why should it have to be they then?
37:39
Well, I don't get that but okay, it's
37:41
okay. That's that's that's weird from Hey, you know what, you
37:44
can't reverse engineer history.
37:47
So you got a them and I'm thinking how do you use that in
37:52
a sentence? You can understand we're
37:55
doing what you just said you hated people do words were
37:59
different back in your ERA John? Second.
38:02
I want you to tell me how you do this. I could say they went to
38:07
the store and then I want to say them hair is brown. How do I say
38:17
her hair is brown into them? Do I say them Harris Brown? I don't
38:23
participate in ice blue.
38:24
I don't participate in this
38:26
Come on. I want to hear
38:28
I don't care. I mean you don't
38:29
know I hate it when I don't get it I would like an explanation
38:34
of I know you can use easy to say they went to the store.
38:38
Okay, they is one person but okay, I can live with that. They
38:42
went to this list but them hair is brown. I just can't forget he
38:45
used to if
38:46
you don't. If you don't stop asking questions. them's going
38:49
to come over and beat you up. That's how you use this not
38:53
English anymore. Come on English Jane.
38:55
Okay, well anyway, so here she is the I'm sorry. What did I do?
38:59
I'm sorry. I did named her I did something wrong. Yep. Here is
39:03
the
39:05
line. I like it. That was a good punch line.
39:08
Here they is telling us what what them's the thing with them
39:14
was simply
39:15
the way that NASA has dug in its heels about naming the telescope
39:21
after James Webb has really cast a pall over that for me
39:26
personally, and I know for a lot of other queer astronomers as
39:28
well. You know, I thought that this was one of I do
39:34
have one issue I've one issue. I don't like the hijack of the
39:42
word queer. I really don't so
39:45
to hijack it's a total
39:47
hijack queer is has been hijacked from the gays. And
39:52
she's gay men,
39:54
and oh, she's not you miss. You miss named her whatever is
39:59
called
40:00
Are you gonna do this the entire show? I can do this the entire
40:03
show? Or is
40:04
it only during this segment only during this clip? Because she's
40:08
the only I did it too. They put the pronouns on there and days,
40:14
what would the term
40:16
queer was a gay a male, male gay term. And of course the gays
40:24
took gay from gay from I
40:27
thought it was I thought queer was a kind of a N word. No. And
40:37
from the 50s and 60s from the 50s. Oh, yes, we're supposed to
40:41
be used when you Korean were supposed to call me when queer,
40:44
right? Could they were homosexual. You couldn't call
40:47
them queer queer was a bad word.
40:49
Again, again, we're trying to deconstruct what's happening now
40:52
with past events. I hate it when people do that.
40:56
You and me both. But that's what we do on the show anyway,
40:59
hateful thing
41:00
we do, let's just finish this, we're never gonna get through
41:02
it. One of that.
41:04
Finish times two, I released this documentary, in part
41:08
because I think we in the astronomy community have gone
41:12
through a number of different methods to try and help NASA see
41:17
sense on this issue. You know, I personally was a member of the
41:21
astrophysics Advisory Committee for NASA for many years until I
41:25
resigned over this issue last fall. You know, as part of that
41:29
committee, we requested that there be an investigation and a
41:33
report which has never been released. So, you know, I
41:36
thought, as part of just space and our producer and editor,
41:40
Katrina Jackson, who pitched this idea to us, you know, we
41:44
really thought that laying out the case with the available
41:48
information about the historical record, and also showing its
41:51
continuation into how queer astronomers are treated now in
41:56
astronomy, was an important thing to do in conjunction with
41:59
this release of these new images.
42:01
What very important, how queer astronomers are treated, what
42:06
are they treated poorly? I missed it, are they getting
42:08
beaten up? Because they're quote,
42:10
I've never heard anything like this. I've never heard that
42:14
queer astronomers are being poorly treated.
42:19
You know, this is this is kind of your, you know, your, okay.
42:24
I'm going to agree with the point you're making ad nauseam.
42:28
That this is a, this is a thank you. This is ground zero of the
42:33
attack on your speech, certainly in the United States, but it's
42:38
everywhere. And perhaps we should all just, and I mean,
42:44
there's people who I respect who work in corporate life, and I
42:47
get an email from them, and it says, you know, pronoun,
42:50
whatever, him, him, he him, you know, it's whatever it is.
42:54
They're putting the proud pronouns in their email
42:57
signatures. And it's, it's coercion, it really is the
43:00
baseline coercion. My, one of my kids does it one of your kids
43:06
does it. And they're not. They're not really, they're not
43:10
jumping up and down and going on knots, but they will correct
43:12
you, they will try and set you straight. And that is deep,
43:16
deep, deep, because they're not freaking out about it. It's even
43:19
scarier, if they were like, like you did, no, like, it's them.
43:28
And so that's true. They're patronizing us at this point.
43:32
They're patronizing us, which which goes against godly parent,
43:36
parent and child relationship, I would say. But if you want to
43:41
know where it comes from, it's just short clip. Someone sent
43:43
this to me was on Instagram. This is a well, maybe she's
43:48
queer, I don't know. But she's talking about her work. 10 years
43:51
ago at a an NGO,
43:53
10 years ago, when I was working at an LGBT nonprofit terms like
43:58
transgender and gender identity, this was all extremely new. The
44:02
general public didn't have any understanding or concept of what
44:05
these terms were, there was no trans child, there is no such
44:08
thing as a trans child. A trans child is a corporate fiction
44:11
that doesn't exist is a concept being forced on to children. But
44:17
there was no such idea. There were like teenagers and stuff
44:20
that identified as trans and actually part of my job was
44:24
going directly into the public schools in New York and work to
44:28
indoctrinate youth in with this new ideology and with these new
44:32
terms, and not just indoctrinate the youth but also indoctrinate
44:35
the educators and now indoctrination of youth is
44:39
finally being exposed. People think like where did all this
44:43
come from? This just started happening like it's coming from
44:46
the UN actually the UN is telling schools all over the
44:51
world to implement this language.
44:53
And there's some evidence of this that is a UNESCO programs.
44:57
I believe I saw this clip. Oh, you didn't. And I didn't, I
45:02
didn't clip it because I didn't like the way it was edited
45:05
personally, and I thought there would like be, I'd like to find
45:07
the clip the real Cliff course. Because there's a bunch of talk
45:11
like this. And all of a sudden, I've been there and there's a
45:15
lot of edits and but I thought it was compelling because what's
45:22
the UN trying to do this for? What's the purpose of all this?
45:26
What is the purpose of this, of this otherwise normal astronomer
45:31
demanding to be called they, instead of
45:36
subversion control, it's subtle. It's like you start with this
45:40
and then before you know it, you have to bow before them. Come on
45:45
this. This is this is how it starts. And we're all just
45:49
talking about it. Let it happen. Maybe you should stop doing it.
45:52
I am pretty sure you're not going to use they in them's on
45:55
anybody. And if they don't want to talk to you, I know you will
45:57
know hard you'll be like
45:59
them hair is brown. Yeah, it's I can say her hair is brown. Her
46:06
hair is brown. Them hair is brown. I just don't see how that
46:09
fits in any structure. That's known to man. It's almost done
46:15
on purpose. Just to make it sound like an alone you refer to
46:19
the person. When you M Harris Brown, who is brown when he's
46:25
only a moron.
46:26
Yes. Hello, you're finally getting it. That's the whole
46:29
point. They're turning you all the all into moronic beans. I'm
46:34
very down on this. It's it's quite obvious to me today for
46:39
some reason. It's like it's all coercion. It's all horseshit all
46:43
of it. And it's been going on kind of a little bit in the
46:47
schools and stuff that was going on and that we weren't seeing
46:49
that we weren't weren't paying attention to that stuff. So
46:58
let's do some more school stink.
47:00
Yep. Well, here's
47:01
some more nibbling
47:02
in education should be ashamed of themselves. And Roe v.
47:05
Wade, which I think kind of goes along with the strain with this,
47:10
this vein that we're speaking of. Here's the two two bills
47:14
were introduced in the House. The House
47:15
by the way, today paths to abortion bills and protecting
47:18
access to abortion in the wake of the Supreme Court's decision
47:21
to overturn, overturn Roe. One protects women who travelled
47:25
across state lines to get an abortion and the providers who
47:28
treat them the other more sweeping measure would enshrine
47:30
Roe versus Wade into law that both dead on arrival in the
47:33
Senate, Senate Republicans have already rejected both.
47:37
He could have done that much better. He could have said the
47:39
abortion bills are dead on arrival that would have been
47:41
funnier. But no, no guns. No puns for this
47:45
is good. He used to be a news writer.
47:48
Well, here's Pelosi because it's all about the woman. It's just
47:52
it's not about anything else. It's not about anything else
47:55
other than protecting women's rights.
47:57
And we offer help to the American people who treasure our
48:00
freedoms. And you were overwhelmingly with us and our
48:03
mission to defend them. What Republicans have in store next,
48:07
you can travel to buy a book, you can't travel to see a
48:11
concert or a play. If they just didn't meet there, shall we say?
48:21
Use the word standards. There's they're what?
48:24
So it's political is really what it is. Thanks, Nancy. We didn't
48:27
realize it was political. I think the Democrats have a
48:32
strategy though. Really? Yeah, I think I think they have what you
48:37
want to hear just an off the wall idea. So the
48:41
I would love to I'm sure we any Democrats out there would love
48:44
to to? I'm sure they're clueless go on?
48:46
Well, unfortunately, the Democrats don't control the
48:49
strategy. But I think this is well that they might a little
48:52
bit. Here's just a version of what could happen. The midterm
48:57
elections, I think that's pretty obvious. Democrats are going to
48:59
come in they'll have a majority in the House, probably. And I
49:03
would say most likely in the Senate. So and you know, some
49:07
other things will then that's not even 100% Sure, but it seems
49:10
like people say oh, it's gonna be a shellacking I think is your
49:13
term. And I think that's true. And I think that's true.
49:16
I have been you shall lacking on this show for at least a decade.
49:20
You are slacker, you are shellac or have ever saw one. So they
49:27
get in and the central bank, the Federal Reserve will keep
49:34
really, they will just they won't do the right thing. So
49:39
that by the time 2024 rolls around, we're gonna be so mad at
49:44
the Republicans that they didn't do anything. And you know, and
49:48
then maybe the Fed will do a 180 somewhere and change it but I
49:52
think it's it's the money that controls how happy people will
49:56
be with the Republicans. There's nothing the Republican Party or
49:59
the democratic part already can actually due to lower inflation.
50:03
That's, you know, that's just not they can't. I mean, yeah, I
50:06
guess they could say let's turn on the drilling pumps and stuff.
50:09
But you know, really, is that going to bring down the price
50:11
quickly? No to really, whatever. It's
50:14
a drilling pump over there. Over here, Hey, Bob,
50:17
once you go below me, I'm just gonna make an example. So it's,
50:23
I think that that may be then everyone will be really sick of
50:26
four years of desperation. And now the cities may really be
50:32
shit. I mean, you can't even get a Starbucks anymore in Los
50:35
Angeles, San Francisco, San Francisco,
50:38
or me just the opposite of shit.
50:41
But did you hear that they closed 16 Starbucks because it's
50:45
just too dangerous for the employees. Where did they close
50:47
them? San Francisco, Los Angeles, Portland.
50:50
Hello. Yeah. Those are your dangerous cities. Anybody who
50:53
does business there, they should pull out everything I wouldn't.
50:56
They should turn look San Francisco. My might as well be
51:01
Cleveland. And I don't I'm not insulting Cleveland or but I've
51:05
been to Cleveland bend to downtown St. Louis, the main
51:08
part you go on to be in St. Louis, where it's safe. You
51:10
don't you're not in St. Louis, you're outside of St. Louis.
51:13
Right. St. Louis is a rough town. San Francisco is might as
51:17
well be. And I'm surprised that these cities haven't become this
51:21
already. You know, they might as well be a Detroit, San Francisco
51:25
mice will be Cleveland, it might as well be St. Louis as a city
51:28
like that is falling apart internally, people should pull
51:31
out of there.
51:32
And that's why you're staying
51:34
not in San Francisco. You wouldn't live in San Francisco
51:38
was the last thing go die thought I would never live in
51:40
San Francisco.
51:41
You're living in the bleachers looking at the show.
51:44
Yeah. Anyone needs I'm in the cheap seats.
51:48
So this is kind of my thinking about how that might go. And
51:51
maybe that's why the Democrats, you know, they're just not going
51:54
to be that worried. They know it's it's it's also the way
51:57
cycles go. But they really want that 2024 and NPR? Well, they're
52:01
clueless.
52:01
The Democratic polling shows that Democrats by and large, say
52:05
they don't want Biden to run in 2024. Don't believe it for a
52:08
second. Yep. They're frustrated with Biden. But Biden is their
52:12
best option to beat Trump. Why? Because he's proven he already
52:14
can beat Trump Biden steps aside, they are left with a
52:18
primary free for all. So that's what the Republicans actually
52:21
will have Kamala Harris, which is to your point. Yes, exactly.
52:25
I mean, what Biden's going to endorse her right away, then
52:28
they definitely lose in 2024, not endorser, those weekly
52:31
lunches are going to be awkward, no good options, except Joe
52:34
Biden on the left. So those polls are about how much
52:38
Democrats are satisfied with Biden, they're not about him
52:41
running again. On the right, I went back and looked at polling,
52:45
you know, going back 2030 years when we've had sort of our
52:48
current primary system, and there has never been a candidate
52:53
so far ahead of the field as Ron DeSantis. If you take out Donald
52:58
Trump, he's running 20 plus points are ahead of every other
53:01
Republican. So if you were rational, and and there were
53:05
people in charge of the Republican Party, what that
53:08
would mean is that you have a two person race between Donald
53:11
Trump and Ron DeSantis. And there's plenty of evidence that
53:13
Ron DeSantis could win and that head to head race, but we don't
53:17
live in a rational world. No one's in charge of the
53:19
Republican Party. And that's absolutely not what's going to
53:21
happen. You're going to have a whole lot of people throw their
53:24
hat in the ring, because no one learned anything from 2016.
53:28
I should have mentioned, this is the NPR podcast where apparently
53:31
you get started at NPR. If you don't, I mean,
53:35
God, this was nuts. Again, you're stepped on my territory
53:40
by pulling in the idea that the Democrats are clueless about
53:43
Biden, and
53:46
I ally up for you, what are you talking about? That was an ally?
53:50
Well,
53:50
I mean, I can say it's a good clip. I didn't get it. I didn't
53:53
get I can't blame anybody but myself.
53:54
Well, how about this? This is good. So maybe the idea is to
54:02
not really let the Trump go be able to heat him. He may be
54:05
shooting his wad too early. It looks there's no way he can run
54:07
in 2020 22. So it has to be 2024. And it's a long way off a
54:13
lot of stuff. You know, they could be as they said, on MSNBC
54:17
with Chuck Todd, they could just be waiting for him to die. But
54:22
you know, we have a team that's working very hard if she can get
54:25
reelected. She'll continue on the gold team. And you heard of
54:28
the gold team?
54:31
No, but I'm about to Yeah, I
54:32
would say Liz Chang is the most power.
54:34
This is Luke. This is Luke Luke Broadwater. Porter for the New
54:39
York Times. Yeah.
54:42
Wait, wait for it. Wait, wait, wait, I'm gonna preface this. We
54:46
introduced this stupid idea is somebody suggested it in some
54:50
Politico? Some moron suggested this idea probably a month or
54:56
two ago. And we kind of laughed it off. I think I brought it in.
55:00
again maybe a few weeks ago, but this keeps cropping up like this
55:04
is insanity. But play please. Yeah,
55:07
I would say Liz Chang is the most powerful behind the scenes
55:10
driving force on the committee. Everybody I talked to says, you
55:14
know, we've got some very aggressive Democrats on this
55:17
committee, people who are known as very fierce fighters against
55:20
Donald Trump. That's sort of the reputation and all of that to
55:23
say, Liz Cheney is tougher and more aggressive than we are
55:26
behind the scenes. And Liz Cheney, also, because of her
55:31
role, with the so called Gold team, which is the team
55:34
investigating Donald Trump. She's been sort of overseeing
55:38
that team. So she has access to some of these depositions and
55:41
interviews that other members and staff don't necessarily
55:44
have. And sometimes I hear from staffers who are completely
55:47
surprised by something Liz Cheney will bring out at the
55:50
last minute, but that's part of the I think the success and the
55:55
drama of these hearings is they they do have teasers, and they
55:58
have cliffhangers and they embrace the sort of part
56:04
elements of television that are not normally present in the
56:08
Capitol Hill Hill hearing. And that's why I think that they're
56:11
getting something like, you know, an average of 14 million
56:13
viewers for these hearings, which I think is for your normal
56:17
congressional hearing.
56:18
I'm glad I'm glad you called bullshit, because this is
56:20
exactly what's happening with these people. They are convinced
56:24
that and of course, the producer, the X ABC news guy,
56:28
they're convinced that they've made something beautiful. This
56:31
is a work of art. This is I mean, this is Emmy award winning
56:33
ship right here. Good job, everybody. Wow. Oh, okay. That's
56:38
the run through we'll see it today's dress rehearsal. I mean,
56:40
they love it. They're in. They're in Hollywood now. And
56:44
they think the ratings are great. That's what a producer,
56:49
14 million viewers, they got a screw loose. This thing runs at
56:52
nine in the morning, they had that
56:54
one anymore. The first one, the first one had 12, or maybe 14
56:59
million viewers, the very first one which was primetime.
57:03
And it was on every single network. Yeah, it was. It was on
57:08
ABC, NBC, CBS, these are all primetime networks. And it was
57:12
on Fox, it was on bell as
57:14
you are not you and I could get 14 million if we just sit there
57:17
and look in the camera as goofballs. As long as every
57:20
station runs it.
57:21
If every station is running you you're gonna get a lot of views.
57:24
But once they went to New enter, once they added up to fetch
57:27
without making any money, and they were only the only get
57:30
maybe 3 million true numbers per network. Did they just bailed on
57:35
the thing? It's not get escaped probably getting less than a
57:37
million. Anyway. So the producer had an ROI. I like to 14 no nice
57:41
try buddy. diluted.
57:44
The producers arranged for the fight the season finale, because
57:49
it's just season one. The season finale to end on the 25th of
57:54
July holla. Dad, did they know what I'm calling?
57:59
Dude, that would have been top of the show if they had done
58:01
that? No, they did not call it but the season finale will be on
58:05
July 25 that will once again be in prime time. So perhaps all
58:09
the networks will run it again. And you know, that just and then
58:14
just let Trumper ride on that. And then you know, we'll get the
58:18
new Congress in the new cycle will slow down and he'd love to
58:21
rekindle it and maybe he'll die. Or maybe we can make the economy
58:25
so bad that people won't even come to Trump rallies anymore.
58:29
Can't afford the gas. I don't know. I mean, there's it's, it
58:33
seems. It seems like that's kind of the only way they can go they
58:38
have no they have no clue. You're right.
58:39
I made a point in the newsletter. I asked the question
58:42
if these Democrats are so worried about Trump that they
58:44
try to doing anything they can to get him out of the picture.
58:47
Why are they worried about this the their numbers themselves,
58:50
they know Biden beat him once Biden can beat him.
58:53
Maybe they blame the poor performance of the Republicans
58:56
who take over which of course is not nothing they can can help.
59:00
Maybe that poor performance but see your trump guy so your trump
59:03
guy see told you Trump guy and anything like that as possible?
59:10
I, we talked about AOC interpreting these hearings
59:15
differently. And I have the clip now. Thank you producer sent
59:19
that to me. This is about the the obvious Feds including the
59:24
guy that you know, no one doesn't never, never even
59:28
questioned apparently is just not in jail was his name. Six
59:32
hearing right after Yeah, Gen six. Yeah. Chance. Yeah, that's
59:34
what to say the committee. Yeah. And the committee. This is all
59:38
about January 6.
59:39
Yeah. Well, yeah. When they bring that guy forward to the
59:42
FBI phony. Yeah,
59:44
well, of course. So there were tons of feds, but the way so the
59:49
way we interpret that is okay, these are John provocateurs, you
59:52
know, they may have kicked it off, or they may and you know,
59:54
it seems like this one guy Ray Epps, who, you know, he's not
59:58
getting the same treatment as people who've done so. More
1:00:00
things like telling people let's go into the Capitol, which is,
1:00:04
you know, in in view of what what people are being held for
1:00:08
and some convicted for would be an offense. So, so he seems like
1:00:12
a fed. In fact, this video of people calling him a fed the Fed
1:00:17
AOC. The hot tamale. Props Alex Stein. She interprets this
1:00:25
completely differently, listen,
1:00:27
and that there were actual officers working with this. And
1:00:31
we never got to the bottom of that, and we never got any
1:00:33
answers about that. And, and to this day, we're just supposed to
1:00:35
pretend that that never happened. No idea what happened
1:00:40
to the people on the inside, who were very clearly sympathetic
1:00:43
with what was going on and opening the doors wide open for
1:00:46
that. And we're supposed to sit here and pretend like none of
1:00:50
that ever happens.
1:00:53
So the cops held the door open says AOC. Okay. All right. And
1:01:00
she thinks that these were just bad actors inside the Capitol
1:01:03
Police and
1:01:04
oh, yeah, they're white supremacists. Oh,
1:01:07
well, okay. So now we now we come to Malcolm Nance. Who
1:01:12
doesn't remember Malcom Nance, very brave American hero. Do you
1:01:15
know Malcolm Nance the brave American? Yeah. Well, he's the x
1:01:19
x intelligence, I think, was the CIA ex CIA guy. And he decided
1:01:25
that he's
1:01:25
one of those guys or whatever. He's, he's one of those guys.
1:01:29
That is like the McMullen character, using some
1:01:34
connections to some intelligence agency to leverage his own
1:01:38
career standing in the world. Correct. Which is appalling. By
1:01:42
the way? Well, I always thought these agencies were all
1:01:44
altruistic, but I don't see any evidence of it with these guys.
1:01:48
It's about to get worse for you. So when Ukraine when Russia
1:01:53
provoked Ukraine, when when Russia invaded Ukraine
1:01:57
unprovoked? I have to say, right, I'm not getting the
1:02:00
script. Right. unprovoked. Nance felt an incredible urge that
1:02:06
urge you had to go and nourish
1:02:08
this guy, a nerd nerd here to go over a nerd.
1:02:13
I don't know where that came from. Here. So he had an urge.
1:02:17
And this and this nerd was to go there and fight and fight for
1:02:22
democracy for Ukrainians. So I have two clips that pertain to
1:02:27
January 6, but here's the setup. It's one minute of him just
1:02:31
because you know, he's back. He's back now. And you know
1:02:34
what, he was fighting the Russians, but he had time to
1:02:38
write a book. So that's why that's why he's here. And he's
1:02:42
with, with Tiffany cross. MSNBC, and we
1:02:49
do have several 100 Americans who are part of the
1:02:52
international Legion for the Territorial Defense of Ukraine,
1:02:55
the unit that I'm currently part of that combat unit, which we do
1:02:58
have a frontline, everyone we're facing as Russia, we do get
1:03:01
routinely bombarded. We routinely fight and but we have
1:03:06
to hold that line, because what's behind us is what's most
1:03:09
important. That's the innocent men, women and children of
1:03:13
Ukraine, and we're there with almost 900,000 Other people
1:03:17
holding 3000 yards, just about 2500 kilometers of war front
1:03:21
against Russia.
1:03:23
So did you actually engage in combat physical combat over
1:03:27
there?
1:03:28
Well, I'm I'm part of the intelligence apparatus.
1:03:31
intelligence apparatus. I haven't actually fired my
1:03:33
firearm at a Russian. I carry a firearm every day. We do get a
1:03:40
big shot. We do actually send, you know, artillery back.
1:03:45
With ups, how do you send it back? Nancy, I'll
1:03:47
make sort of war. When the war goes more kinetic of course,
1:03:51
because I'm part of the command team. We have to be prepared to
1:03:54
fight
1:03:55
Oh, he's part of the command team for the intelligence unit.
1:03:58
And I carry a weapon with me at all times. And I read a book
1:04:02
while I'm doing this important intelligence work. So this book,
1:04:06
when I was over there, I realized something about
1:04:08
America. It was bad. It was bad back home. That's why I'm back
1:04:11
to fight here. Back home
1:04:12
now. Sounds very frightening. The war happening in Ukraine. I
1:04:16
wonder
1:04:18
that all this is the most sincere thing she could have
1:04:22
said. That all sounds really frightening. Yeah. Oh, that
1:04:25
intelligence work you're doing as a part of the combat brigade.
1:04:28
And
1:04:28
all sounds very frightening. The war happening in Ukraine. I
1:04:32
wonder what a war here in this country might look like. And
1:04:38
that's what your book is essentially about? Because you
1:04:40
just face off with people who were trying to kill Americans.
1:04:43
You are coming home to people who you say are also trying to
1:04:45
kill Americans hate on the second
1:04:47
or the Russians trying to kill Americans?
1:04:50
I guess so.
1:04:50
That's what she just said
1:04:52
to us. Sounds like
1:04:54
you just came back from a war where people are trying to kill
1:04:56
Americans. Did she but she said Americans try to kill Americans,
1:05:02
that Ukraine,
1:05:03
Ukraine, yeah, but that's what they do there.
1:05:05
You are coming home to people who you say are also trying to
1:05:08
kill Americans. So tell me who you're talking to. Again, tree
1:05:14
might look like. And that's what your book is essentially about.
1:05:18
Because you just faced off with people who were trying to kill
1:05:20
Americans. You are coming home to people who are also trying to
1:05:24
kill Americans. Tell me who you're talking about.
1:05:26
You know, I juxtapose my time and Ukraine as, as that being
1:05:29
the Eastern theater in the defense of global democracy. And
1:05:34
every once in a while I hear what's going on back in the
1:05:36
States. I take a look at my Twitter feed, I look over my
1:05:38
shoulder at the Western Wall in the defense of democracy here in
1:05:42
the United States. And it's collapsing. Yeah, appears to be
1:05:45
collapsing. We have, you know, when I predicted this on
1:05:48
November 6 2020, when I was on Real Time with Bill Maher. It
1:05:53
was saying kumbaya time to shake hands to understand what they
1:05:56
really want. And I said, I'm seeing something completely
1:06:00
different. I nailed it, seeing an insurgency form. Yeah. And
1:06:03
that is a campaign to destabilize the sitting
1:06:07
government and 62 days later, the first strike of that
1:06:11
insurgency would happen, which was the insurrection here at the
1:06:14
Capitol hailed insurgency is a long term campaign. It's not a
1:06:18
one day thing. You saw a second day, they have been pushing
1:06:22
their campaign both politically, and threats of paramilitary and
1:06:26
personal action.
1:06:27
Okay, there's a lot in there to digest to
1:06:30
each blog. I want to digest one thing from the first clip you
1:06:33
played. He says that there's a to a thesis there on the front
1:06:37
lines with the Russians. Yeah. Got it done by a side he's not
1:06:40
shooting at him. But he's there. And he says the front the
1:06:44
Russian the front, is 2000 miles. Yes. 2000 mile half, two
1:06:49
and a half. Do you know is the distance from San Diego to
1:06:53
Seattle is 1200 miles so you're telling me what it what what is
1:06:58
this? What kind of a front line is it does 2000 miles of
1:07:03
fighting? Come on You dumb shit.
1:07:07
Nice. I mean, it's very obvious what what he's come home to do
1:07:14
in this book that he's written. He did an amazing man that he
1:07:17
had time to defend Americans being killed in Ukraine and
1:07:21
without firing his weapon once and to be in the in the don't
1:07:25
forget carries it. He does carry it on at all times. And he would
1:07:29
send some when Yeah, when they had something incoming that send
1:07:32
it back like, oh, dear Putin, I'm gonna send this back to you
1:07:34
call the FedEx scan the code. So yeah, of course, but it's just
1:07:39
in case it wasn't obvious what he's really talking about. I
1:07:44
think we can kind of figure it out, can't we?
1:07:46
I really believe you know, I'm a Philadelphia. I'm an originalist
1:07:49
on this thing. I'm offended, deeply offended when I see
1:07:52
people use the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution
1:07:56
of the United States to justify trying to invent a world that is
1:08:00
strictly limited to one ethnic group in the United States.
1:08:04
These are the, you know, I'm talking about, you know, Trump
1:08:07
supporting your demographic is Yeah, Trump
1:08:11
supporting Caucasian voters, Trump's supporting Caucasian
1:08:16
voters, so their voters, they're Caucasian, and they support
1:08:20
Trump.
1:08:20
This is your profit. Sounds less.
1:08:22
That's your demographic right there. That is the same people
1:08:25
as jet. In fact, the Russians, they're actually Russians
1:08:29
because they also want to kill Americans. And don't you dare
1:08:32
tell me about something. I'm a Philadelphian, the city of
1:08:35
brotherly love. I'm a traditional constitutionalist
1:08:40
in the United States, these are the, you know, I'm talking
1:08:43
about, you know, Trump supporting Caucasian voters. I'm
1:08:46
sorry, but that's who your demographic is. Yeah. You know.
1:08:52
Listen to the black lady go. This is so embarrassing for
1:08:56
these people.
1:08:56
Africans. Yeah. You know, if I were to do an intelligence
1:08:59
analysis from for MI six, you know, that's precisely I
1:09:03
wouldn't
1:09:04
do them. Now. To me, it's
1:09:06
the truth comes out with this guy. Now he's not working for
1:09:09
them. And I'm sure they wrote the book for him. Demarai six is
1:09:12
always a bigger enemy than we realize I'm quite convinced of
1:09:15
that
1:09:16
analysis from for MI six. You know, that's precisely how it
1:09:20
would react, right? No one's right fooling anybody here
1:09:24
right? The problem is, is that they feel that their position
1:09:27
within society over the last 245 years, their current, you know,
1:09:31
strength and how strongly they feel about Donald Trump gives
1:09:35
them an advantage that should wipe out all equality in
1:09:39
America. To remove the words diversity from America. They
1:09:42
want to remove the words equality from government
1:09:45
documents.
1:09:45
No, we only want to remove the pronouns they in them. That's
1:09:49
all
1:09:50
this is what we fought for. When my great great grandfather and
1:09:54
brother ran away from slavery. Their first thought wasn't, oh,
1:09:57
let's go up the Mississippi and get jobs It was let's go to
1:10:00
Tennessee, get into the US Army uniform and fight for what
1:10:04
little incremental progress we can make. But they weren't
1:10:07
fighting just for black slaves who had run away. They were
1:10:10
fighting for all America. My family serves for all America, I
1:10:14
still serve for America by giving you this warning. But if
1:10:18
you're a real American, you will look at yourself and say, Hey,
1:10:22
wait, wait a minute. I part of this am I am I here to use the
1:10:25
Constitution as a figure and tear away all the rights from
1:10:28
your other fellow citizens?
1:10:32
I mean, well, there's that old term I bring it up once in a
1:10:34
while. It's called the shuck and jive artist. Yeah. Yeah. And
1:10:38
this guy seems to be one of them.
1:10:41
So now this this is programming. Somebody was making somebody
1:10:45
feel good. And how is the constitution being used as a fig
1:10:48
leaf? I'm not quite sure I understand what he's talking and
1:10:51
maybe he meant his a wedge. Well, that's kind of he is kind
1:10:55
of he has a bit of sharpness in them. Because, you know, he's
1:10:59
his, his grammar is is proper, unlike Sharpton, but he just
1:11:03
says weird shit. This is like, what? What are you talking
1:11:07
about? And we have to go look and see if he used the word
1:11:10
insurgency on Bill Maher when he was on. I don't remember that.
1:11:15
Maybe he did. To us, anyway, that you know, what's happening.
1:11:22
The Warriors go back and fight. I
1:11:23
find it yeah, we'll find that available.
1:11:25
The war in Ukraine is of course, a war against Americans and
1:11:28
Russians killing Americans. But it's it's a it's a problem that
1:11:32
the messaging is dying down. It's not really front news. You
1:11:36
know, I think we don't actually have Americans dying or
1:11:39
Europeans dying. That's that's part of the the marketing
1:11:43
problem of this. And it's being just used, you know, it's been
1:11:46
concatenated. To or abstracted to Putin surprise hike, that has
1:11:50
to include the war in Ukraine. So NATO needs to combat these
1:11:55
false false rumors about Russia, about what did what's really
1:12:00
going down how this took place. And you know, because it's
1:12:02
disinformation. So they made a beautiful animated video to
1:12:06
share with us exactly that.
1:12:11
Russia continues to spread lots of false myths about NATO. So
1:12:15
let us set the record straight. One myth is that NATO is
1:12:20
aggressive towards Russia and is trying to encircle it. This is
1:12:24
not true. NATO is a defensive alliance. Its purpose is to
1:12:29
protect its allies. NATO does not seek confrontation and poses
1:12:33
no threat to Russia. Every sovereign nation has the right
1:12:36
to choose its own security arrangements. Russia has
1:12:40
subscribed to this fundamental principles, who stay true to it
1:12:43
and invite Russia to do the same. Another myth is that NATO
1:12:47
promised Russia would not expand after the Cold War. No such
1:12:51
agreement was ever concluded concluded NATO's door has been
1:12:54
open to new members since it was founded in 1949. And this has
1:12:58
never changed. This open door policy is also enshrined in
1:13:03
article 10 of NATO's founding treaty. Decisions about
1:13:07
membership are taken by consensus among all allies. No
1:13:12
treaty signed by the United States, Europe and Russia
1:13:15
includes provisions regarding NATO membership. The Myths need
1:13:20
to be dismantled the record needs to be set straight
1:13:26
thanks NATO. So you understand now Russia no full of shit of
1:13:32
course, you this folder full of shit Russia is just not as old
1:13:34
as and not true. There's so much I would call it outright cover
1:13:44
up going on right now, certainly about Russia stuff. And when it
1:13:48
comes to the primetime purge, last night, we were we were
1:13:51
skimming around through what can we watch? There's not much going
1:13:54
on. But there's a new series. The new series is on Netflix web
1:14:00
of make believe death lies and the internet. And you probably
1:14:05
haven't seen this but we looked at the first episode. And it was
1:14:10
it was something was actually kind of decent, you know, but I
1:14:12
don't remember what it was. It was up at some scam that people
1:14:15
pull on the internet. And I said this is really this is this is
1:14:18
produced ghosts. Actually, I should probably look at that. I
1:14:21
should see what that was. which one it was. And I thought this
1:14:26
is kind of decent. It's it's it looked really well made. And so
1:14:31
you know, while we're watching the first episode, I look it up
1:14:35
and it's Ron Howard. Ron Howard is has produced this and I think
1:14:41
he might he's no slouch he Well, he's no slouch. He's also a
1:14:44
massive insider for the Democratic Party. I
1:14:48
would say he's a beast. stooge. Let's put it that way.
1:14:52
The first one was death by SWAT which is very compelling because
1:14:56
you know the swatting of people where you call the SWAT team and
1:14:59
have Amongst gamers a lot and happens to Tim Poole a lot and
1:15:03
then this is their stories of this guy who did 37 swatting he
1:15:07
had courtrooms evacuated with his phone he calls. And then one
1:15:12
time one of these gamers gave him a said, Oh, come on, come
1:15:15
and swap me punk. And he gave his old address and the guy over
1:15:18
there just opened the door and got shot by the cops. So I was
1:15:21
like, Oh, this is pretty compelling. But I think that was
1:15:24
just a draw. It's a good story. Yeah, that I think that was just
1:15:27
to draw us into Episode Two. A murder in DC. And this is about
1:15:32
Seth Rich. Ah, oh, they leave out any mention of the transfer
1:15:40
of the files. And I just had to show Tina I just showed Tina
1:15:43
William Binney, where they, they did forensic evidence, you know,
1:15:46
like, no, no, this was transferred to
1:15:50
obviously, Ron Howard bring Binney on the show. No, no
1:15:53
mention of Ron Howard would would bring Binney on not
1:15:57
nothing but sets not
1:15:58
even mentioned of really of what's in the emails, you know,
1:16:02
like Donna, Brazil, and all the none of that. Yeah, Debbie
1:16:06
Wasserman Schultz had to resign over what was in those email.
1:16:09
This is Podesta level shit. And then, and then they put that in
1:16:13
there. What Oh, no, no, no, of course.
1:16:17
Now, what would it be? No,
1:16:18
are they laterally. Now it was like yoga, yoga things, recipes,
1:16:25
joking back and forth. No mention of any of this. You have
1:16:29
what they had mentioned of his rod Wheeler and all these books,
1:16:33
but kowski and all these weirdos who showed up to get on the
1:16:36
news. And these poor parents are like, we didn't tell them to do
1:16:39
that. And so they kept getting kind of hoodwinked by. And I
1:16:44
would say like Alex Jones wannabes, people who have a
1:16:47
little bit of cash, and then they'll do some get some
1:16:49
investigation going, and then they go on TV, and then they
1:16:52
just start spouting and spouting and it's a mess for those
1:16:54
people. But no, no discussion of any of the things that we know
1:16:59
even well, you know, the server went to CrowdStrike in Ukraine.
1:17:05
You know, no mention the FBI never really saw it. All of this
1:17:09
stuff. Just the guy from CrowdStrike gone. Yeah. So
1:17:12
what you're telling me is Ron Howard, basically Congress did a
1:17:16
whitewash video just to cut do a cover up for the Democratic
1:17:19
Party?
1:17:20
Yes. Yes. Okay. Well,
1:17:23
good for him.
1:17:23
But the but why what are they worried of? I mean, are people
1:17:27
that close to spilling the beans that the somehow magically this
1:17:31
will flow across the M five M? What are they worried about?
1:17:35
Nothing,
1:17:35
I have no idea what they're worried about because so water
1:17:37
under the bridge ish. That doesn't shouldn't concern
1:17:41
anybody Exactly. There must be something something you write
1:17:46
and read has to be something that's big, and they have to
1:17:48
continue to cover it up.
1:17:51
So there's and there's a lot of articles about I put a couple in
1:17:53
the show notes. A lot of people tried to help me out with this
1:17:59
and I really appreciate the clip custodian he pulled it out of
1:18:02
his but since we're talking about cover up in the media, not
1:18:07
reporting truthfully, he made us a little supercut of reasons why
1:18:11
people are dying. Guess what it does not include.
1:18:19
In tonight's medical alert calcium supplements are so
1:18:22
popular but a recent study shows they can increase your chances
1:18:25
of a heart attack studies
1:18:26
show chemicals in cannabis are linked to an increased risk of
1:18:30
heart attack,
1:18:31
you might be vaping as a step toward quitting cigs thinking
1:18:35
it's less bad, right? But guess what? It looks like it's just as
1:18:38
bad for your heart. So
1:18:39
tell us about this link between shoveling snow and heart attack
1:18:43
energy drink monster can it kill. The FDA says it has
1:18:47
received reports of five deaths and one heart attack.
1:18:50
They found that people who live near higher levels of traffic
1:18:53
noise had a higher risk of having a heart attack. A
1:18:57
recent study found being lonely and socially isolated can
1:19:00
contribute to the risk for heart disease. 20% of people who
1:19:04
present with either a heart attack or what we call an acute
1:19:07
coronary syndrome actually have depression. The report indicates
1:19:11
that particle pollution could cause an increased risk of heart
1:19:14
attacks strokes your
1:19:16
risk of getting a heart attack increases if you work out while
1:19:19
you're stressed
1:19:20
adult several eggs per week had significantly higher cholesterol
1:19:25
and were more susceptible to cardiovascular disease and death
1:19:28
believe in
1:19:29
Advil already caution users about possible heart risks. Now
1:19:33
the FDA is strengthening those warnings
1:19:35
they raised it from these may cause an increased risk of heart
1:19:38
attack and stroke to they do cause an increased risk of heart
1:19:41
attack and stroke.
1:19:43
Just a sampling just a little sampling. Gardening is gonna
1:19:46
kill you being lonely will kill you. You're gonna have heart
1:19:50
attack looking at the sky. Oh, don't look at the sun.
1:19:53
Oh, washing the car.
1:19:54
Washing washing the car. That okay, I love the working out
1:19:59
while you're stressed out A lot of people work out to relieve
1:20:01
stress. Oh, I know that'll kill you. Okay,
1:20:05
so if you my favorite thing which I heard in there, which is
1:20:08
not about the heart attack, but but the common use of guests
1:20:11
What if during the report, hey, people are having a hard day,
1:20:16
guess what? And then they forget, guess what? They just
1:20:20
throw out Guess what? And I'm always you know me, you're
1:20:23
always guessing. I'm sure I stop and guess that's the point.
1:20:28
So what is the point of that an NLP the neurological neuro
1:20:34
linguistic programming trick? What is the what is it? Guess
1:20:37
what is that to get your attention like oh, oh, now my
1:20:40
brain is going in, I guess?
1:20:42
Well there's two things that are used as that sort of filler. One
1:20:45
is guess what? And the other one is, you know what, which is also
1:20:48
a question, you know what
1:20:49
I always say? Yes, fuck off. I do go away. So if you're
1:20:57
wondering, why is it that no one's really speaking up about
1:21:00
things that might be actually happening as because everyone's
1:21:03
constrained, everybody's constrained, including doctors.
1:21:07
And, and this guy has been around, I'm not quite sure how
1:21:10
he as a doctor at Johns Hopkins is allowed to do this. He's been
1:21:14
doing it since I think we have a clip from him from March of
1:21:18
2021, Marty Macquarie. And he just lays it out there. Why
1:21:25
you're not hearing about, you know, people actually having
1:21:29
adverse events to vaccination.
1:21:31
Doctors everywhere in the world, even in the government should
1:21:35
always be free to speak up about their public health concerns.
1:21:37
That is a sacred right that we have to guard. But right now, in
1:21:41
the government recently, and this is a trend in the last
1:21:44
year. Doctors are muzzled that I've met talked to many doctors
1:21:47
for this piece at NIH and CDC, who are extremely frustrated,
1:21:52
they're smart people, they know that a vaccine efficacy of 4%
1:21:56
doesn't warrant an authorization. They also know
1:21:59
that there's no health emergency right now, among kids, six
1:22:03
months of age. So I learned a lot. They know the underlying
1:22:06
data, they know it's inappropriate, they're not
1:22:08
allowed to speak to anyone if a reporter calls they
1:22:11
Communications Office has to approve the the call the
1:22:14
conversation. And if they wanted, ask the scientists
1:22:19
whether or not they want to do this, they'll say tell us what
1:22:21
you're going to tell the reporter and then we'll decide
1:22:22
whether or not to approve it. At the CDC, a bunch of scientists
1:22:26
actually said, Look, we recognize the insanity of mass
1:22:30
testing, trying to chase down every case of the virus in the
1:22:33
United States. It's ubiquitous now it's not contained. So they
1:22:37
came up with a plan to use sampling data like we do with
1:22:40
influenza every year and to get better numbers from the hospital
1:22:44
of those truly in there for COVID. Not just everybody with
1:22:47
incidental COVID tests. And that plan was proposed and it was
1:22:50
rejected, and they say was rejected by the White House and
1:22:54
over and over in the different agencies. I heard from smart
1:22:57
people who are just extremely frustrated that not only are
1:23:01
they bypassing the normal scientific process, but they he
1:23:04
really can't say anything, because if they do, they know
1:23:07
that their jobs are at risk, and they'll be treated very
1:23:10
differently. One person even said, there's no transparency as
1:23:14
to how Dr. Fauci makes his decisions. He doesn't even
1:23:18
consult with the real experts. And other people have said other
1:23:22
things like it's demoralizing that one person at the FDA even
1:23:26
who knows the data, really well said that they feel that they're
1:23:29
watching a horror show and they can't close their eyes. They're
1:23:32
being forced to watch this. If public health wants to restore
1:23:36
some credibility, and there's good people in public health,
1:23:39
they've been sidelined. The leaders have to have more
1:23:43
humility, less absolutism, more answers, like we don't know when
1:23:49
that's the right answer. And less paternalism. That's the
1:23:52
only way we're going to rebuild trust in the medical profession
1:23:55
and in public health.
1:23:57
Again, I don't know how he's allowed to do this as a as being
1:24:01
employed by Johns Hopkins. But it rings true. Luckily, two
1:24:07
doctors went to the the Senate, Tennessee government and they
1:24:14
testified in the Tennessee House. How do I know they're
1:24:16
doctors? They were wearing lab coats. This is very good guys.
1:24:19
Keep that up. We need that and this kind of speak for
1:24:22
700,000 people in the study in Israel, just so you know, that
1:24:26
showed that the double Vax were 27 times more likely to get
1:24:30
reinfected. So it's not the vaccine, even if we just talk
1:24:33
about that is not stopping infection. It's not stopping
1:24:35
transmission. If you look at the studies in England, in Scotland,
1:24:39
in the northern countries in Europe where they get real data,
1:24:42
that they're actually the triple vaccinated are the most likely
1:24:44
to die. So bottom line is that we as we go forward, the natural
1:24:50
immunity is long, broad and durable. And I don't know if you
1:24:53
mentioned it, but we have SARS cov one patients who still had
1:24:57
immunity 18 years later Let that sink in 18 years later, we still
1:25:04
had immunity from SARS. cov. One Two SARS cov. Two, this is long
1:25:08
broad durable immunity. So what I want to say in closing is
1:25:12
natural immunity should be considered legally to be at
1:25:14
least equal to vaccinated immunity and immunity is likely
1:25:17
lifelong. Thank you.
1:25:20
I just like guess what I don't like it when someone says let
1:25:24
that sink in. And why don't you just shut up for three seconds
1:25:28
and let that sink in?
1:25:30
What's the other one? There's another one that is think about
1:25:33
it is about think
1:25:35
about it. Well, that's Biden does think about it. A couple
1:25:38
more. Oh, this just in from Italy. sudden and unexpected. At
1:25:43
least 11, vacationers dropped dead on Italian beaches in 24
1:25:47
hours. Must be the sun. Maybe it's the bikinis.
1:25:52
bikinis are killing the fruit juice? Who knows? Yeah.
1:25:54
Bikinis killing people.
1:25:58
Drop dead. Yeah.
1:25:59
Oh, no, we're gonna hear a lot about this now. Feared from
1:26:02
them. Boss is back. He's the guy that has been saying since early
1:26:06
on, you do not mass vaccinate. This is not a good idea. The
1:26:10
tears will come. And he's calling now he's tripling down
1:26:15
on his predictions. He's saying it I'm sorry that I hate to have
1:26:19
to say it. But here's what's going to happen. He does give us
1:26:22
some solutions. Because he, he taught us I think on the last
1:26:27
episode, we played a clip, we said because of the vaccinations
1:26:30
and what they do to the immune system. The vaccinated are
1:26:33
literally creating variants. And their immune system just may
1:26:40
give up eventually, and not be able to handle any of it
1:26:42
anymore. And by the way, again, he does give he has some very
1:26:47
specific example stuff you can do. I'm not trying to fear
1:26:49
monger, I don't think this will happen to everybody. I don't
1:26:53
think Oh, everyone was vaccinated is going to die. But
1:26:56
we don't know. So let's see what fear has to say,
1:26:59
to realize that most of the vaccinees that are coming to the
1:27:04
hospital right now, they are still not, you know, the
1:27:08
majority is still not hospitalized, because because of
1:27:13
COVID-19. These are typically the patients you know, that are
1:27:17
suffering from other diseases because of I would say immune
1:27:20
separation due to COVID. So they are hospitalized with COVID with
1:27:24
a number of other diseases. What will happen next, I'll tell you
1:27:29
what will happen next is that finally, these people, you know,
1:27:35
they they are they are a breeding ground for you know,
1:27:39
the more virulent variants of COVID-19, that ultimately when
1:27:44
the virus managers and that will happen, manages to overcome the
1:27:50
virulence neutralizing activity that is now exerted by the
1:27:56
infection enhancing antibodies, right with the virus will
1:27:59
overcome that activity, you know, the virulence,
1:28:02
neutralizing or virulence inhibiting activity of these
1:28:05
antibodies, then what we will see all of a sudden, is that the
1:28:09
virus that is highly infectious in those people, you know, will
1:28:13
completely resist any last immune defense against
1:28:17
virulence, and will blow not only through the innate immune
1:28:21
system, but even through the adaptive immune system. And that
1:28:24
is why I'm saying, you know, I, you know, for me, that is not
1:28:28
fun at all to kind of like discriminate vaccines, and my
1:28:32
heart goes out to these people. What I'm telling is that there
1:28:35
is an urgent need an urgent need to make antivirals, you know,
1:28:41
available to these people. And it needs to go very, very fast.
1:28:46
I recommend every everyone who is thoroughly vaccinated,
1:28:50
especially those who got vaccinated early on during the
1:28:53
pandemic, because they had an opportunity to train their
1:28:55
innate immunity, right. And they have, you know, they just have
1:29:00
their vaccine antibodies that will be completely worthless,
1:29:02
and that will even enhance the disease to get, you know, to get
1:29:08
their hands on antivirals, because otherwise, what we're
1:29:11
gonna see, I mean, I've no doubt about this is huge rates of
1:29:15
severe morbidity and mortality to begin with in people who have
1:29:21
been vaccinated early on in the vaccination program, before they
1:29:25
even had the chance to you know, to be exposed to the virus and
1:29:29
to train them to some extent your innate immunity. That is
1:29:33
what you're going to see.
1:29:35
So what I didn't clip but you can, you can only guess what he
1:29:37
had to say about inoculation or vaccination of mRNA mRNA with
1:29:42
infants six months and older. He said this is a disaster. The
1:29:47
children don't get a chance to develop as you heard him talking
1:29:49
about your innate immunity. And he says particularly people who
1:29:54
were never exposed to the virus early on who got vaccinated
1:29:58
right away and he says I hate to discriminate. But you guys are
1:30:00
screwed, or potentially. And if you keep on boosting, then
1:30:04
you're going to need Antivirus for all the crap that's going to
1:30:07
come down the pike. And of course, if you look up COVID
1:30:10
antivirus guy disappeared from the bush. This is the guy.
1:30:14
Oh, the guy the anti Yeah, yeah, he's the
1:30:17
guy that has a very highly, highly accredited Makala level
1:30:23
type guy is immuno immunology. And he says, You got to get
1:30:30
antivirals. Of course if you if you just guy immediately search
1:30:33
COVID antivirals what pops up? remdesivir and Paxil COVID are
1:30:39
this severe is dangerous. Yeah, I
1:30:40
wouldn't. I wouldn't say that. But if you look a little bit
1:30:43
further, I mean, people are saying ivermectin, oregano. Oh,
1:30:47
yeah. But I think Tamiflu I think Tamiflu and Cipro and you
1:30:52
know, because it's not it's not about the COVID is all the other
1:30:55
stuff you won't be able to fight off. That's the way I understand
1:30:57
it. Maybe what what is indisputable and I didn't clip
1:31:02
this I'll just read it to you is, people who notice death
1:31:06
rates going up, these people are typically working the health
1:31:09
insurance or life insurance industry. But there's a full
1:31:13
interview, you can look at it link in the show notes of family
1:31:17
business for 30 years, they've been making caskets. This is
1:31:20
This is usually a pretty good Bellwether, typically the casket
1:31:24
industry remains pretty stable. And an unusually big casket
1:31:28
order usually indicates a traumatic event, but recent
1:31:30
sales indicate this has changed not only our sales up, but in
1:31:34
the past. For every five full size caskets we sold. We sold
1:31:38
one youth size. Now for every five eighths to they will they
1:31:44
say they're receiving bulk orders for smaller size caskets
1:31:47
first in their 30 year history.
1:31:51
So, heaven forbid the news media look into these stories
1:31:56
seems like something you would want to look into it sounds
1:31:59
like some good writing of you know, I had this a Pulitzer in
1:32:02
this for someone
1:32:03
instead, here's where we get on CNN,
1:32:05
should people be masking indoors, again, given the extra
1:32:09
infectious nature of this new variant?
1:32:11
Well as the CDC makes it very clear upon the density of
1:32:16
infection of the dynamics of infection in the place where you
1:32:19
live and you see the
1:32:21
dynamic here Have you ever heard of the dynamics of infection
1:32:24
this is new John now we have a giant dyno meter a dynamometer
1:32:28
to check how the infection is in certain spaces
1:32:31
section and the dynamics of infection in the place where you
1:32:35
live and you see if you look at the map map just a couple of
1:32:39
months ago it was a lot of green and some yellow red seeing a
1:32:43
fair amount of orange which means orange should in an indoor
1:32:46
setting, a congregate setting be wearing masks it's the to
1:32:53
protect yourself and your family and those around you because you
1:32:57
could get infected and inadvertently kill grandma any
1:33:00
symptoms transmitted to someone perhaps in your own household
1:33:05
grandma Oh trouble either an elderly person Yeah, grandma,
1:33:08
someone would immune compromise. And that's the reason why when
1:33:11
you're in an area where the infection dynamic is high
1:33:15
infection, you should wear a mask in a congregate indoor
1:33:17
setting
1:33:18
congregant Oh, I like to use of the word congregate setting like
1:33:22
congregation church don't go to church.
1:33:24
What's the current timetable? Do you think, for approval for
1:33:26
Americans under 50 to get their second booster shot?
1:33:29
Well, it's being very seriously and actively considered. John,
1:33:33
we were talking about this just literally every day for the last
1:33:37
couple of days. Obviously, this is something that is an FDA
1:33:41
regulatory decision. Those are the people most qualified to
1:33:45
look at the data and to make a decision whether or not they
1:33:48
would extend the regulation to be able to give it to people
1:33:51
less than 50 but I can tell you this is something that is being
1:33:55
actively discussed. I can't predict if and when it will
1:33:58
happen but I believe it's going to be within a very reasonable
1:34:02
period of time.
1:34:03
So just keep on booths and people can I ask you a question?
1:34:06
Yeah.
1:34:08
How come they haven't given this thing full FDA approval how long
1:34:11
how long do we have to wait before this thing actually gets
1:34:13
approved? Do you mean the as opposed to emergency youth
1:34:16
authorization
1:34:17
Do you mean the fourth booster shot
1:34:19
or any of them a the first one the first shot the second shot
1:34:22
the third shot the fourth shot the upcoming fifth shot the
1:34:25
sixth shot? Well it's obvious first when they shot for the
1:34:28
kids the shot for the little boys was shot for the babies all
1:34:31
those shots are stole under why can't they get disapproved
1:34:34
what's the deal? What's the problem was what they
1:34:36
did but there's we don't have access to common rd one of
1:34:39
them but let's get this never been here.
1:34:41
That's what I'm saying. We don't That's what I'm saying. We don't
1:34:44
have access. Well, okay.
1:34:45
Here's another question for you. Then. When the commodity one was
1:34:49
approved, which was everybody came out and it was I believe we
1:34:53
have clips or we had clips with it. Yes, it was it. Don't worry
1:34:55
about it. It's exactly the same as the Pfizer Well if that's the
1:35:00
case if it's exactly the same, then why don't they approve to
1:35:03
Pfizer want to just give it the stamp of approval? If it's
1:35:07
exactly the same it's still under emergency use use use. You
1:35:13
might not know me well,
1:35:14
well, maybe you're not using the right pronouns no one can answer
1:35:18
you anymore. This is obviously this this is this is the problem
1:35:23
but I just like to know why they can't. Does anybody notice this?
1:35:28
We do.
1:35:34
That's called letting it sink in love that.
1:35:36
That was let it sink in people that is thinking think about it.
1:35:39
Think about it. That was really good.
1:35:41
And with that, I'd like to thank you for your courage say in the
1:35:43
morning to you the man who put the sea in coffins for kids,
1:35:46
ladies and gentlemen, my friend on the other end, Mr. John C.
1:35:50
Devorah.
1:35:54
Mr. Adam curry, if that is indeed your real name. anymore,
1:35:59
no. sipsey boots on the ground feet in the air subs in the
1:36:01
water all the days and nights out there.
1:36:04
Hey, trolls, how you doing? It's Sunday. Let's count your hands
1:36:08
up. The trolls are scurrying around. Oh yeah. Troll count
1:36:13
back up a little bit. 2338 For today, we'll take it. Now. These
1:36:17
are people. These are people's listening live.
1:36:20
About 100 More than last Sunday.
1:36:22
There was so that's good. I welcome that. I welcome that.
1:36:25
But 100 more. Yeah, they're listening live. No agenda
1:36:28
stream.com And they're trolling along in the troll room at
1:36:31
troll. room.io They've already handed me some one liners. I
1:36:35
like it. I appreciate it. That's why I always log in.
1:36:37
We're gonna get a material.
1:36:40
Hey, at least I don't have to pay someone like you do. Marty
1:36:44
the grain you pay Marty the joke writer.
1:36:47
I haven't paid Marty. The joke writer for actual material for
1:36:51
decades.
1:36:51
Then he's coming today after he hears that he's like gets it to
1:36:54
vorak He owes me some money sell them for 10 bucks a pop.
1:36:59
You get to get jokes written first, you have to find some
1:37:02
joke writers that are around there around MRT. And it all
1:37:05
right. Well, Marty doesn't do that. So much. I mean, he does
1:37:08
his own material. But there's joke writers around the use of
1:37:11
the out of out of work. Comedians and Ed, but to work
1:37:15
with them is fantastic. Because they just, it's just, they have
1:37:19
a different brain works. They're just like artists. They see
1:37:22
things differently.
1:37:23
You know, they could do those brains, they could get a heart
1:37:26
attack.
1:37:27
That 10 bucks a pop thing. I don't know. I mean, that was the
1:37:30
last time I had jokes written that was
1:37:34
that's now $1,000. So congratulations.
1:37:37
I don't know what you know, it's 10 bucks in the 60s it was 10
1:37:40
bucks. Because we had a guy when I was at KF JC and Foothill
1:37:43
College, there was a guy there was buying jokes and it was, you
1:37:46
know, free. Oh, he knew he was writing jokes for this one guy
1:37:50
who was in class. He was writing jokes for Phyllis Diller room,
1:37:54
and she Yeah, and she was paying 10 bucks a joke. And it was 10
1:37:57
bucks a joke later, and it's 10 bucks. As far as I know, it's
1:38:01
like, maybe it's still twice got to go to 20 someday.
1:38:05
Anyway, the trolls are worth 10 bucks a pop, at least it could
1:38:09
be more it could be 1000 with inflation now and besides that,
1:38:13
it's just a fun place to go hang out and talk. Shit post if you
1:38:16
want to hang out you'll find nice people there if you want to
1:38:19
find really nice people. Sorry. But some trolls also go to no
1:38:23
agenda social.com which is where we have a mastodon federated
1:38:26
instance. So you can follow me I got a great I got a great chip
1:38:30
poster on there the other day. That was he was really saying
1:38:35
horrible things. I kind of engaged with them. And then you
1:38:38
know, of course he turns out to be really intelligent, dropped
1:38:40
his guard for two moments. And I pointed it out and then that was
1:38:46
it.
1:38:46
What happened? I feel good, good bit. Give us the story. Again. I
1:38:50
wasn't followed. Oh,
1:38:52
I'm not prepared for it. I could read it. But it's
1:38:55
but not somebody was giving you grief.
1:38:57
But the point is, well, someone was saying oh you can just block
1:39:01
the whole domain and like kind of block any domains here
1:39:04
we blocked like it You very rarely block no but
1:39:07
but I have I'm not a blocker. I'm a lover. I have the power
1:39:11
the god mode power to block an entire domain from being seen on
1:39:15
no agenda social and there's nothing there. Oh, you wouldn't
1:39:18
do that. Oh, of course, I would miss this dynamite material
1:39:22
which I will prepare for the next show. It's
1:39:24
mostly some of its pretty sick. Yeah,
1:39:27
but I but I think I can prepare some fun, which anyway, turns
1:39:31
out the sheet posters are okay, actually, you just got to engage
1:39:33
them differently and we'll get to all triggered, so not worth
1:39:36
it. So anyway, what we don't have is algos that keep
1:39:39
triggering you is it's calm. It's a conversation. You can
1:39:42
block if you don't like a domain, you can block it for
1:39:45
yourself and you'll never see anything from there. That's
1:39:48
That's democracy. Okay, that's hanging a balance. Just saying
1:39:54
that has no agenda social.com Follow Adam at no agenda.
1:39:58
social.com John C. Dvorak. No. To the social.com It's a good
1:40:01
idea. Now let's take a look at the art work and the artists who
1:40:05
brought it to us for episode 1468. We titled that super woks
1:40:10
I think was appropriate people were going crazy over this art
1:40:14
they want it on T shirts right away. Hello, no agenda shop.
1:40:18
This was brought to us by was a capitalist agenda. I believe who
1:40:21
who's really working hard. I had a he had a hat trick in the last
1:40:26
couple of weeks, and now he's back. This was the wily wily
1:40:29
coyote who fell through the ground we're splat on the ground
1:40:36
with he was holding a BA five sign for the variant. And then a
1:40:40
big booster anvil acjc D with little lightning bolt coffee cup
1:40:47
it was hidden and also the no agenda font that he used it was
1:40:52
hitting a lot of a lot of
1:40:54
nail that designate what you call a nail that piece there was
1:40:57
nothing I mean, that's not the patient you are attracted to no
1:41:01
but but it's the if you look you like the for one thing you did
1:41:06
like Riley's 4000 beagles. You didn't like I like Riley stuff.
1:41:11
In general. You
1:41:13
didn't see you know, your what you said, Well, I liked that.
1:41:16
You said, Well, I don't get us. It's Fauci. I didn't see Fauci
1:41:20
so when that happens, then it didn't work and then that was
1:41:23
enough for me even though I prefer it if you didn't see it
1:41:26
didn't work no good veto
1:41:29
and so it wasn't a veto I just said I didn't like it. And then
1:41:33
but I liked this right wily coyote thing because it's just
1:41:36
slick look and it was it was it looks hyper professional. It was
1:41:42
and the compositions dynamite everything about it is that it
1:41:46
has not not a flaw I can imagine. There was a lot of man
1:41:49
I can imagine flaws believe me. There was
1:41:51
a lot of mac and cheese art. I personally liked Taunton. Neil's
1:41:55
Bastille Day which you just hated because there's tons of
1:41:59
Neil then mountain J's Lita eat let them eat mac and cheese with
1:42:05
Marie Antoinette. I think you said another woman I hate so
1:42:10
those had to go
1:42:13
well, you give me the trouble with the ladies.
1:42:17
Oh, yeah. You now we did discuss it was kind of between
1:42:20
capitalist.
1:42:22
Okay, yeah, the the Bastille Day by 10 to kneel. I just didn't
1:42:30
like it. And I can't you know, it's for one thing that like the
1:42:33
French flag you didn't rolls into the red of the French flag
1:42:37
in the background. I don't like that. That was like if
1:42:40
you didn't make that point. The point you made at the time was
1:42:43
about the font
1:42:45
the legibility was an issue. Yeah, and I
1:42:47
did not disagree. But that was after you told me the real
1:42:50
reason. Now we also liked capitalist agendas cool. There
1:42:57
was the tacos and they were holding up the CEO up letters.
1:43:02
Yes. Yeah, I liked that piece. A bit.
1:43:06
It was nice. We discussed it but it didn't compare really what
1:43:11
else did we see that was of any
1:43:13
and is there's a typo with a but the one who dealt with comics or
1:43:16
Blogger it's like
1:43:21
we see a but anyway there's a but in the artwork you don't
1:43:24
even have to look at CSB.
1:43:26
I did like buggin cheese buy from Nico same miss ya me an
1:43:34
artist that I'm most familiar with. But I kind of like the bug
1:43:37
and cheese piece and and this person I can tell us a man or
1:43:40
woman to be who they are them nice stuff. That's pretty good.
1:43:45
Yeah. You don't want to they also did they also do one that
1:43:49
you kind of like which was big Gary? Yeah, sloth. Hello, my
1:43:53
name is Gary had the support sloth with a mass Yeah, like
1:43:58
that I liked like this is a cute piece.
1:44:01
I thought all the work is fine. I mean, you have to understand
1:44:03
for us we're done with the show. It's three and a half hours of
1:44:06
course we've had a good 2448 of hurry up prep time so it all
1:44:11
comes kind of to a crescendo and then hopefully at the end we're
1:44:15
all like laying back smoking a cigarette said Ha is a good
1:44:18
show. And then we get to enjoy the artwork which is fun. It's
1:44:22
like no I don't think ever have I had this much fun and post
1:44:26
production of a program.
1:44:29
It is a kick going over the art and and discussing it.
1:44:32
Especially when you get into an argument we get to favorite
1:44:34
pieces. And we have to find ways like the one you almost won you
1:44:39
beat me down on that turned out they forgot to put divorce.
1:44:43
Right right. Right, right that classic Yeah, and you were
1:44:47
reveling over that Oh, I get you know agenda, our generator.com
1:44:51
If you're listening live then you can just go ahead and
1:44:53
refresh it. Those people are already putting art up for
1:44:55
today's show. That's how it works. These artists are
1:44:57
phenomenal. You can find there are It's over at no agenda
1:45:01
shop.com on mugs, hats, T shirts, hoodies, koozies you
1:45:05
name it, you know, no contractual relationship there,
1:45:09
they just they work it all out, the artist gets a third, the
1:45:12
shop gets a third and then the shop donates once in a while and
1:45:15
then we love it and we have great products and and the art
1:45:18
is unparalleled certainly for any other podcast I've ever seen
1:45:23
ever. That's how it works value for value, time, talent and
1:45:27
treasure. We got it
1:45:28
I should mention it Paul couture. This is I'm trying to
1:45:31
get to trying to get
1:45:33
a hold a hold dump of the database.
1:45:37
And he's he's not cursing like any other normal coder. Instead
1:45:41
of doing that he's decided to redo the entire thing. Oh, from
1:45:45
scratch,
1:45:47
on chosen headless Drupal again.
1:45:49
No, no, he stopped using Drupal some time ago. The thing is
1:45:53
react. That's No, he's I'll tell you what it is. If you want to
1:45:57
hear what some coding base that he's he switched long time ago
1:46:03
out of Drupal was like a nightmare. And he also mentioned
1:46:06
that Drupal people are the worst case of the World Social Justice
1:46:12
Warrior. Yeah. So
1:46:13
what I thought was the problem surprises so
1:46:15
it's impossible to deal with them or anybody else. So here it
1:46:18
is. I got his note. Okay, I got sideline, he hasn't given me
1:46:22
what I'm looking for. But okay, he's gonna do this a news thing.
1:46:24
He's got a timeline here. And he has a workplan 2014. He, he was
1:46:31
version one was built in Drupal six, then he got sick of this
1:46:35
SJW is version two of the site launched in October 2014. Built
1:46:40
in Laravel.
1:46:42
Wow, what kind of eight big stuff is that?
1:46:46
Oh, no. Version Three is coming soon is going to be Laravel
1:46:49
trees and he made a comment. Headless Drupal was a dead end,
1:46:54
but necessarily a stepping stone for the PHP developer community
1:46:57
to adopt modern practices. He's the made that as a comment.
1:47:03
He says Laravel Laravel isn't a framework for PHP?
1:47:07
Oh, yeah, he's gonna do from the ground up. Laravel nine. Oh,
1:47:12
wow. With nine
1:47:13
I prefer 8.3. I think that's
1:47:17
her eating me hear about it two seconds ago. But
1:47:19
this is why we have a troll room. I know that it's a
1:47:21
framework for PHP. And I say it as if I have intelligence and
1:47:25
knowledge in the area.
1:47:26
You know, that's what people do. If you use this, those kinds of
1:47:29
things ground
1:47:30
up framework. Hey, I'm telling you, Sir Paul couture. I love
1:47:34
you, man. But all the cool kids are using React.
1:47:38
You now you're going to open ended with a senior hearing a
1:47:40
lecture about that was no good.
1:47:42
Yeah. Jharna divorce.org. John White's enjoyable to tell John
1:47:47
wise, no, good.
1:47:48
I never heard a Laravel either.
1:47:51
dude's name Ben has certainly no due dates name.
1:47:55
Bernadette and the left behind. Yeah.
1:47:58
So that's as always, you know, that's something that Sir Paul
1:48:02
just took upon himself to add as to add value to the community
1:48:05
just like we have sir Daniel with no agenda meetups.com. We
1:48:09
have served voids, void zeros or mark over there in the north of
1:48:13
Holland running infrastructure. We got sir bemrose running the
1:48:15
stream. It's like, we have hundreds of people who've
1:48:19
contributed throughout these, by the way I haven't heard from
1:48:21
Chad in Colorado. So I'm going to send them a note.
1:48:25
Number we're going to talk Okay, yeah, that's
1:48:27
why I was a little worried. I know he listened. So I'll find
1:48:30
out another guy who get you know, people who send us
1:48:32
information, we got a donation note here, which is actually
1:48:35
quite information filled. So we'll get to that as we thank
1:48:38
our executive and Associate Executive producers for episode
1:48:42
1469. It's very simple. If you get value out of the show, then
1:48:48
you let us know that by sending us some digits, you make the
1:48:51
numbers valuable to you important to you, whatever works
1:48:54
for your value proposition, whatever you have. That's all we
1:48:58
care about the value that you place on it, and we kick it off
1:49:01
with John from Key West. And I presume he's an inch tonight.
1:49:09
But all I have is on his note is hat off to no agenda slaves and
1:49:12
their human resources.
1:49:15
Here's what's interesting about this note, I don't know if he's
1:49:18
on the knighting list, but he probably should he better be
1:49:20
nice.
1:49:22
I'll check John I'll check right but
1:49:25
Eric added a new category to his rundown when he says for us to
1:49:30
deal with we have to agree certain things and do this and
1:49:32
that to get
1:49:33
to that we have a back off
1:49:34
back off his notes. And he's got this new category called
1:49:37
disappointing note. Line to John.
1:49:42
I went right away. I'm like, Oh, someone's bitching at us. It's
1:49:45
gonna be horrible. They're
1:49:46
leaving us this is not a disappointing notice after the
1:49:49
fact that maybe doesn't have the night name, which maybe
1:49:52
disappointed Eric Yeah, but this is the kind of note we want.
1:49:58
That's exactly what Well done good balance for the show. Well,
1:50:04
he's gonna be Sir John. If he wants to change it, he can send
1:50:07
a date and we'll take care of him. And we're going
1:50:09
onward we're Dame meow Addison who's a ultra Mont Springs,
1:50:15
Florida 718 and 33 cents in the morning, Damian Addison here and
1:50:21
newly certified yoga instruction instructor make a donation for
1:50:26
my birthday Monday, July 18. As she's on the list, I never
1:50:30
claimed to protect her at when I was granted my Baroness status.
1:50:34
So I would like to claim Central Florida sure you got Disneyworld
1:50:39
enjoy it? Good luck with that.
1:50:42
Good luck with that miniseries yeah you we see fit, central
1:50:47
Floridians I'm planning a meet up near the end of July keep
1:50:50
your ears open and check no agenda meetup.com Please keep up
1:50:54
the great work I adore you both karma please love and light PS I
1:50:59
keep forgetting the notes email alias. Can you announce it
1:51:03
again? Oh yeah. Adam will he knows what notes is
1:51:07
notice notes at no agenda show.net It's three ends notes
1:51:13
at no agenda show.net N three.
1:51:17
Search a few episode Trump's because but no such luck. It
1:51:20
should barely be listed somewhere that's easy to find.
1:51:22
We'll put it in our mission statement. You've got karma. Up
1:51:31
next we have Nick Leary. 371 69 interesting number from Columbus
1:51:37
Ohio. Right Nick says Romo here Rogan no agenda mo fax, sending
1:51:43
some well earned treasure back to you both give me a dose of
1:51:46
art to D to mechanical karma. I'm fixing up my 97 probe GT
1:51:51
from high school I'm gonna need every bit of it. Oh please give
1:51:54
yourselves a Karma as well. Love is lit I think he's he's on the
1:51:57
prowl. We have a nick is out. He's trying to pick up chicks
1:52:01
with his 97 probe. GTF got karma right
1:52:08
now this is a no you're gonna have to read because it blows
1:52:11
out my spreadsheet. It's so big. Yeah. And this is what I would
1:52:15
call the disappointing note.
1:52:17
Did you read it? You didn't think that you didn't think I
1:52:19
can't read it? Oh, this is anything but disappointing.
1:52:23
Well might be good notes for the show, but it's not a good note
1:52:25
for me reading it.
1:52:27
I'm sorry to hear that. Okay. Nathan Winder are Winder from
1:52:33
Stillwell, Kansas. 333 Dots 69. He's got the 69 for the episode.
1:52:37
Thank you very much. Thank you for all you do to make the
1:52:39
greatest podcast in the universe possible.
1:52:42
You're so good. Yes. Starting off. Well.
1:52:45
Your recent comments about noodle boy college kids having
1:52:48
to grow up in real jobs sparked my favorite story from Google
1:52:52
after having worked there for eight years. Now this is the
1:52:56
kind of story that the daily wire would headline with Google
1:52:59
insider talks about social justice warriors at Google. No,
1:53:03
no,
1:53:03
we actually read this note as an email. I didn't read it as a
1:53:06
note note, but yeah, it's quite funny.
1:53:09
I was brig begrudgingly recently promoted to engineer manager and
1:53:13
our leaders decided it was time for a project wide management
1:53:16
culture building off site. Whoo hoo. Boy bored out of my mind
1:53:20
all day. We had we then had some practical theoretical exercises
1:53:25
to practice our new management skills. Anyone who's been to one
1:53:28
of these knows exactly what he talked about. The off site. Oh,
1:53:32
goodness. Did we have off sites at pod show? That was a balloon
1:53:34
thing. He loved off sites.
1:53:36
He liked dad in all hands. Corn balls, Stan? Valley. All corn
1:53:44
ball,
1:53:45
a scrum. Let's do a scrum everybody. My favorite
1:53:49
hypothetical hypothetical was this a software engineer
1:53:51
identifying as a cat demands of litterbox to relieve themselves
1:53:56
with their hypothetical tech company standard responses all
1:53:59
around Of course we should provide we could convert a
1:54:03
meditation room or Foosball area for them blah blah blah. I'm
1:54:07
quiet dying laughing on the inside keeping my head down
1:54:10
avoiding eye contact just want to get through it for beers that
1:54:13
happy hour. But then the giant People Ops which apparently is
1:54:17
Google speak for the HR lady, the giant People Ops, I think we
1:54:22
should keep that in there GPO. So the giant People Ops lady
1:54:25
somehow locks onto me decides to hound me to get my thoughts. I
1:54:30
tried to defer and defer and defer but the boss gives me the
1:54:33
look to answer so I reluctantly answer. Well, give them the
1:54:37
opportunity to succeed elsewhere. Shocking the room.
1:54:42
Why the white whale hire the cat. Hold on a second. anymore
1:54:48
like in a mark that one. Why the white whale with blue hair
1:54:51
inquires. This is this is this is like a book I would read I
1:54:55
would buy this book. If I asked if it is legal to hire a cat for
1:55:00
Work It seems like animal abuse. Confusion ensued Of course I
1:55:05
finally feel the awkward silence asked if the cat has a license
1:55:09
has a designated Guardian has had all their shots and do we
1:55:13
have those records and so on and so on? Get a reluctant no for an
1:55:16
answer seems like we have a stray animal need to call animal
1:55:19
control. The boss is shooting me death stairs to pump the brakes,
1:55:23
but momentum can't be stopped now. I suggest we survey the co
1:55:26
workers to make sure they aren't allergic or potentially pregnant
1:55:29
to avoid toxic to avoid toxoplasmosis. begin planning
1:55:34
additional first aid and cleaning protocols as needed.
1:55:37
Buddies around me are biting their lips so hard people ops
1:55:40
beluga has turned that awful fat jar indicated white color to
1:55:43
bright red like she had just shuffled back a record time from
1:55:46
the nearest office snack bar 100 feet away. I finally get cut off
1:55:51
after five minutes of bullshitting. So I sit back bask
1:55:54
in the glory of malicious compliance at happy hour. I dig
1:55:57
it out of my eye dig it out of my boss. This was currently
1:55:59
happening with the software engineer at you guessed it,
1:56:02
Google. Good news. They got them their precious litter box. And
1:56:07
yes, Google is sucking up absolutely all of your data of
1:56:10
any kind and selling it to anyone they want add companies
1:56:13
government and on and on. Avoid any and all Google products
1:56:16
people at least the pay was great. Now that's a not a
1:56:22
disappointing note. I will. Good you've got karma rel done
1:56:29
them better in this show, I think. But what's that good
1:56:32
note? Very funny, and he's probably dead right about all of
1:56:35
it. And Google is just outrageous in terms of what they
1:56:38
do. Greg hoy in Orange County, California comes up next in
1:56:42
contrast with Trina $33.33. And the contrast is his note is the
1:56:47
following take my money no typewriter this time executive
1:56:51
producer named ear Hopper at all balance he was the name ear
1:56:56
Hopper for
1:56:58
oh, we have to change that.
1:56:59
I think so.
1:57:01
Let me just make the change. Here. Are
1:57:03
you doing while you're doing that? Go on with the next one.
1:57:05
Okay, good sir B and A B and that struck bayonet straw in in
1:57:09
Nashville, Tennessee 33333 33 episodes since my last donation
1:57:15
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That table Leti but
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Short and sweet. Laura Slagle, we think we'd say Sligo. Sligo.
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Slagle two Oh 2.22 South Boston, Virginia. And this is Wait, did
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I mess that up? No, I got her I'm sorry. Even my spreadsheets
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going nuts. Two Oh, 2.22. I'm not quite sure what the
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significance is. We'd like it Associate Executive Producer
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So we're all decks with an egg.
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Row ducks with an egg Morgan. This is for my son. More gone.
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I'm sorry, Morgan. So with an O two O's Morgan. He's 27th trip
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around On the son on the 17th I'm also thanking him for
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Allen Dix who's gonna get the credit of Spring Hill Florida at
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believe so he also became so Alex Dix also gets the credit.
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Yeah, okay. All right. Done.
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Puts it up there switcheroo you got to consider it done. Not
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because he's a great friend. He's not getting the credit
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because he's a great friend. Not because we've served together in
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Donald loves Nazis.
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Don't laugh. Why are you all laughing? Shut up. You've got
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karma.
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That was short. Very short segment today. Sure.
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But we get to good notes and the chief petty officers and then
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the Googler.
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The Googler had to be my favorite is a great, great note.
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I mean, that's the thinking you got to have, you know, it's a
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version of what you did about the day them only much better.
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Because he hadn't rehearsed it
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your time, talent and treasure for producing episode 1469.
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Our formula is this. We go out for yet people in the mouth
2:04:10
I am going to violate a rule number five Biden
2:04:14
clips. No. Oh, there's
2:04:17
Tucker Carlson Biden clips. She's specific. Oh, I
2:04:21
already violated the rule. But you didn't know it. What did you
2:04:25
do? I played the doctor who was saying that? No. You
2:04:29
paid Yeah, but you didn't have choruses voice. Exactly. Okay,
2:04:34
well, I got a series of clips about Ben. Carlson bitching and
2:04:38
moaning about Biden's dementia.
2:04:41
Yes. Good.
2:04:42
Good. You saw that show? I'm sure.
2:04:46
You know, let me be honest. I always watch the last five
2:04:50
minutes of Jesse waters. If it's not one of his man on the street
2:04:54
things which shows how stupid America is. I'm usually asleep
2:04:58
about five minutes into it. Tucker during his monologue when
2:05:02
he repeats everything the second time, so I may have missed it.
2:05:05
Now you get tuckered out i There it is, ladies and gentlemen $10
2:05:09
jokes.
2:05:11
And there we got a million of them. So now we're talking which
2:05:14
is $10 million. The let's play. This is the one that got my
2:05:18
attention to make you want to do the series at all, which is the
2:05:21
Biden dementia pills clip.
2:05:23
Okay, this Joe Biden anyone? Oh, yes, this is huge. This Joe
2:05:28
Biden, anyone who knew Joe Biden had seen before he completely
2:05:31
changed. This was clearly cognitive decline. This was
2:05:33
dementia, obviously. So we drew a conclusion that now sounds
2:05:38
ridiculous, but it seems logical at the time this guy can't be
2:05:41
the Democratic nominee he can barely speak. How did he manage
2:05:44
to get through the campaign? Well, it turned out we learned
2:05:47
later, his staff, supervised by Dr. Jill, his wife, was giving
2:05:52
him pills before every public appearance check in the time and
2:05:56
at a certain hour giving him a dose of something now the sort
2:05:59
of guests aren't making that up. We spoken directly to someone
2:06:02
who was there and saw it happen multiple times. Now, before
2:06:06
taking the medication, this person said Biden was quote,
2:06:09
like a small child, you could not communicate with him. He
2:06:13
changed completely because he was on drugs. And he clearly
2:06:16
still is on drugs. No one's pushing to know what those drugs
2:06:18
are, we should know. But the point is Joe Biden's dementia
2:06:22
was perfectly obvious to everyone around him more than
2:06:25
three years ago,
2:06:27
a medical breakthrough.
2:06:30
Well, I have a couple of problems with this. Generally
2:06:34
speaking, when you Jack somebody up before, like, you know that
2:06:38
they're in a situation where they need to be high on
2:06:41
something to go out to perform. It's usually a shot because it
2:06:47
gets into the bloodstream fast. Pills take sometimes a half an
2:06:51
hour. Well, anyone who who smokes pot, like yourself, and
2:06:56
compares it to edibles. edibles, take hours to edibles is
2:07:03
no good.
2:07:05
Maybe he goes sublingual, it could be some sublingual thing.
2:07:09
I don't know. But okay, I thought that would you think
2:07:11
somebody be talking about it besides Tucker. But why would
2:07:14
they? Can I can I
2:07:14
present Tucker, I just want to say something about this pill.
2:07:18
Because if this if no matter what it is it but if it truly
2:07:22
was a pill, and he seems very adamant about this, that it's a
2:07:25
pill would I mean, there's millions of people who would
2:07:29
love to bring their parent or grandparent to their senses out
2:07:34
of dementia, for the average, you know, 12 minutes or I think
2:07:37
20 minutes max for Joe. And I think we look at 20 but it's 20
2:07:42
minutes just to say okay, here's the deal. Here's what's going
2:07:44
on, here's why you're here. Here's why we're putting this
2:07:47
the straitjacket right, whatever it is. I mean, this. I don't
2:07:52
have that in my life. I have friends who have parents with
2:07:54
dementia, and it's really horrible. And they heard their
2:07:57
story. They're like, You mad how I would love they're not even
2:08:00
they don't give a shit about Joe, can I have this pill?
2:08:04
That's how big this this is, which I agree it doesn't sound
2:08:08
like it could be true because this would be so important to so
2:08:12
many people. It would be a huge,
2:08:16
huge why I was skeptical. I'm skeptical of this story. But
2:08:19
then he points out that of course this is also could be
2:08:22
part of the get Joe, which we talked about on this show
2:08:26
specifically, which is the idea that the Democrats are doing
2:08:29
anything they can even though they have this push back like
2:08:32
you played that earlier clip of push back? Oh, yeah. No, he's
2:08:35
still great. You know, it's gonna be great, get reelected
2:08:38
and all the rest, a lot of people want to get rid of him.
2:08:41
So he then he played his super cut, not a big one, but a short
2:08:44
one of dementia super cut, which I want to preface this. All
2:08:49
these are from MSNBC and CNN, no place else. And they're all
2:08:55
basically something completely different than what was played
2:08:58
by the same networks. Like two years ago,
2:09:02
everybody watching everyone in the media that would include
2:09:04
Barack Obama's former advisors is now in agreement that Joe
2:09:08
Biden is senile and cannot govern the United States.
2:09:12
Shuttles sometimes because he has, you know, you know,
2:09:17
mobility issues that the doctors have identified him sometimes
2:09:20
his speeches tend to be a little listless or he seems to
2:09:22
momentarily get confused or have trouble summoning names.
2:09:25
A third of them, the largest number said, age that he was too
2:09:30
old. That is a problem. That's not going to get better. He's
2:09:33
not going to get younger. It's not
2:09:34
gonna get any younger. I think there are a lot of people who
2:09:36
have looked at him over these last years, and he isn't what he
2:09:41
used to be 10 years ago.
2:09:43
He knows he's 80 years old. 7980 years old. He knows he's an old
2:09:47
white guy in a party. Damn demographically changing and
2:09:51
diverse. And the future is not going to be a white guy
2:09:55
when he does badly when he stumbles. You get nervous, and
2:09:58
you wonder, is it just a start? or is he tired or something else
2:10:01
there? Anybody says the Democrats aren't beginning to
2:10:04
have these questions behind closed doors. That's not true
2:10:06
people are Oh, yeah.
2:10:10
Now, by the way, the guy just said all white guys and all
2:10:13
white guy has so funny. Now later in the show, or later in
2:10:17
this presentation,
2:10:19
sad is what it is. Jonasson these days are not funny
2:10:22
anymore.
2:10:23
No, I'm,
2:10:24
you're amused. You're amused. Okay, good. I'm always
2:10:27
amused. So later in the show, and this was recorded and not
2:10:31
and I'm not sure this was screwed up by Google, or if it
2:10:34
was a network screw up or whatever. But he went back in to
2:10:39
prove his point. Tucker, played another supercut of the same
2:10:47
people and more it was a long supercut of all the people
2:10:50
talking about oh, no, Joe's fine, is gray. And they went,
2:10:54
you know, this before during the election, and, and then somehow
2:10:59
it got all jumbled with other clips of Tucker talking about
2:11:03
something completely different. And then this and that, and then
2:11:06
it drops into the middle of a commercial. It's a complete
2:11:10
disaster. And I'm wondering if this was done on purpose, or if
2:11:16
it was, you know, the heat or something into that they've
2:11:19
decided they agree to never play again. That's my guess. Because
2:11:24
I do that goes on
2:11:25
now. Do you remember what it was a syllable Biden stuff?
2:11:29
Yeah, this is a part of the same presentation about Biden's
2:11:32
dementia. And Tucker is bringing home to play by playing another
2:11:36
super cut debt. This same people that you just heard talking
2:11:40
about, oh, I don't know. They were all jacked up. And here it
2:11:43
goes and listen to this. Well, which one is under? I'm sorry.
2:11:47
It's under Carlson epic fail. Okay. Well, he
2:11:50
just decided to bypass the primaries and go right to the
2:11:52
main event, and kind of consigned everybody else to the
2:11:55
kiddie table. That
2:11:56
is Joe Biden at his best. That is someone who is authentic.
2:12:02
It's the reason he connects with people. He is having fun. This
2:12:06
is not heavy lifting for free. Joe Biden, Joe Biden never gave
2:12:11
up on Joe Biden. And it reminded me so much of 2008
2:12:15
We have some special entree into the secrets of the Democratic
2:12:18
Party. We certainly don't we're hardly Democratic Party
2:12:19
insiders. But because you
2:12:20
were Joe Biden was just woeful. He needed to Carter Byrne who
2:12:26
used his authority of South Carolina among black voters to
2:12:30
he had just decided and Barack Obama as well, that Joe Biden
2:12:35
just woeful, I mean, you know, just 29% I think of Democrats
2:12:40
should.com You can also watch over the weekend. awesome.com
2:12:44
Watson dot coms
2:12:45
last chance to get my original my slippers. Mic. Now I'm pretty
2:12:53
sure that was your recording or so I don't think that this has
2:12:55
been done to domestic recording
2:12:58
was done off site.
2:13:00
Yeah, but I have a recording. I'll go look at it. I'll bet you
2:13:03
have a full recording. Okay, Google may have done that. But I
2:13:06
don't I have Comcast.
2:13:09
You have a recording. And you did on Comcast. Yeah. Okay, I
2:13:14
want you to listen to it and see how it ends.
2:13:16
Okay, I'll check but I would have known I would have heard
2:13:20
about this. But I think it's just inferior product from
2:13:23
Google. Or maybe Google was doing that for some reason.
2:13:25
That's pretty conspiratorial. That's that's that's a stretch
2:13:28
for you. So Must you really feel like that must have happened?
2:13:31
Well,
2:13:31
I felt that it was a really good super cut day was all bad shot.
2:13:34
You're mad. Okay. I got Yeah. I screw you guys, Google.
2:13:39
So let's continue. I want to continue this with the Biden and
2:13:43
the Middle East report that comes out of NPR. And there's a
2:13:46
few items in here that are definitely especially the third
2:13:49
clip that are something we need to discuss and this is Biden on
2:13:54
Middle East. NPR one.
2:13:57
President Biden is on his way back to the United States. After
2:14:00
a four day trip to the Middle East. It was his first time
2:14:02
there as president. He reaffirmed commitments to Israel
2:14:06
and released more aid money for Palestinians. And he attended a
2:14:09
summit with Arab leaders who the US is hoping will keep oil
2:14:13
supplies flowing as gas prices remain high. This morning. He
2:14:17
told them the US intends to remain a key player in a region
2:14:20
where American rivals also seek influence we will
2:14:23
not walk away and leave a vacuum to be filled by China Russia or
2:14:29
Iran will seek to build on this moment with active principle
2:14:35
American leadership.
2:14:36
Dr. Gao we did another pillar Dr. Hill when you know the
2:14:40
same thing I noticed and NPR was not doing this before and now
2:14:44
they're playing some of Joe sounding like he's out of it.
2:14:48
Again part of the scheme to get rid of the carrot
2:14:52
with no possible with no candidate to back him up. Let's
2:14:55
get rid of him.
2:14:57
Gavin Newsom Well they got two years to come. Oh somebody over
2:15:03
two years Okay,
2:15:04
this is what I hate. I don't mind do I love this show? I love
2:15:07
my job but the fact that I have to wait two years to see this
2:15:11
thing come to a conclusion is bugging me.
2:15:14
Why you want to quit tomorrow?
2:15:15
No, I need I need resolution Joe. something's gonna happen to
2:15:18
Joe.
2:15:19
He went to instant gratification is that you probably get the
2:15:21
instant gratification.
2:15:22
Like a like, like, like someone subscribing and following check
2:15:26
mark. Yes.
2:15:27
I never got the blue checkmark. Oh, that's yes. Okay. Let's
2:15:32
continue this little trick.
2:15:34
But the visit was overshadowed by the meeting with Saudi Crown
2:15:37
Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who US intelligence agencies say
2:15:41
approve the operation that killed journalist Jamal
2:15:43
Khashoggi and 2018 and PRs five Montana's has been following
2:15:47
events from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. And she's with us now.
2:15:49
Fatima, welcome. Thank you for joining us.
2:15:51
Thank you for having me.
2:15:53
So let's start with the latest activity today. That was Biden's
2:15:56
speech to a meeting of nine Arab leaders, Gulf countries along
2:15:59
with Egypt and Jordan, what stood out about Biden's message?
2:16:03
You know, the president painted a positive picture saying the
2:16:06
Middle East is relatively stable, and also more united
2:16:09
than it has been some main points from his speech today. He
2:16:13
said the US and Gulf countries will be investing in clean
2:16:16
energy water resources, and working to address the ripples
2:16:19
of Russia's war in Ukraine, on energy markets and food
2:16:22
insecurity in the region. He talked also about coordinating
2:16:26
efforts on air defenses, freedom of navigation to counter threats
2:16:30
from Iran, which was a big theme across his trip. And finally, he
2:16:33
also underlined the United States commitment to promoting
2:16:36
human rights in the region.
2:16:38
Well, to that point, I mean, as we know that there was a lot of
2:16:41
attention and frankly, some outrage over Biden's meeting
2:16:44
last night with a Saudi Crown Prince, he's the facto leader of
2:16:48
the country. Biden had called the country a pariah when he was
2:16:51
running for president. So would you talk a little bit more about
2:16:54
that to kind of recap that for us? Yes,
2:16:56
absolutely. You know, all eyes were on his first interaction
2:16:59
with the Crown Prince at the Al salaam royal palace here in
2:17:03
Jeddah. We saw Biden greet Mohammed bin Salman with an
2:17:07
outstretched fist bump. This did not go over well with many in
2:17:11
the US and it was widely criticized by human rights
2:17:13
activists as being too warm and friendly. So then, at a late
2:17:17
night press conference on Friday, the President defended
2:17:20
his meeting. And so that he actually brought up the issue of
2:17:23
human rights and specifically the killing of Khashoggi at the
2:17:26
top of his conversation with the crown prince,
2:17:28
he basically said that he he was not personally responsible for
2:17:33
it by supply indicated I thought he was a man first of all.
2:17:38
I indicated a profit so you go up to you. So Adam, is you kill
2:17:42
that guy?
2:17:43
My pronouns are they them?
2:17:47
And then you then you say, no, no, I think it did. No, so what
2:17:54
would happen if
2:17:56
yes, he indicated he indicated doesn't mean even said it he
2:17:59
indicated he probably won't with his head like he raised an
2:18:01
eyebrow.
2:18:04
Here's a deer said parts reassured me that's got some
2:18:07
issue with I have an issue with this clip.
2:18:10
Now, human rights advocates say that the meeting will likely
2:18:13
embolden the crown prince to be more oppressive than he already
2:18:16
is that they see Biden didn't actually have to meet with him
2:18:18
to get Saudi cooperation. But you know, that's an open
2:18:21
question. As you mentioned, the Crown Prince is the de facto
2:18:24
leader of the kingdom. He has consolidated power. And Biden
2:18:27
certainly felt that he needs Saudi cooperation on oil to
2:18:31
maintain the truce in Yemen and also to oppose Russia's war in
2:18:35
Ukraine.
2:18:37
Oh, brother,
2:18:38
now, was it to maintain the truce in Yemen? or maintain the
2:18:43
troops in Yemen?
2:18:44
Oh, that's good. I didn't hear you know, let me I said when I
2:18:47
was that
2:18:48
power. And Biden certainly felt that he needs Saudi cooperation
2:18:52
on oil to maintain the truth in Yemen and also to truth build to
2:18:57
maintain the truth in Yemen and the
2:18:59
truth the truth, what is she saying
2:19:01
cooperation?
2:19:02
Oh, I can't get it.
2:19:03
Well, let's listen again. Let's listen again Saudi
2:19:05
cooperation on oil to maintain the truth in Yemen and ultrices.
2:19:09
Truce
2:19:09
what truth?
2:19:11
Does she didn't she say troops?
2:19:14
know everyone's the trolls think she's saying truth? Truth people
2:19:21
think truth, truth, truth. Truth. truth. What truth? I
2:19:25
don't know. There's a truth. Coffee. I have no idea.
2:19:31
Saudi oil to maintain the truth in Yemen and also to oppose
2:19:36
Russia's war in Ukraine.
2:19:38
The truth, the truth?
2:19:39
I don't know who it was. I'll pose Russia's war. How does it
2:19:44
dataset oppose the war? What is she talking about? This woman
2:19:49
this woman, NPR interviews, whatever you say? Can't
2:19:54
understand what she's saying. She's talking to myself
2:19:56
really close mic not really talking like me. Hannah, she's
2:20:01
probably on scene. She's their
2:20:04
ass and whatever. No, I don't think so. But
2:20:08
hilarious, hilarious.
2:20:09
I can't figure out what she's talking about. And then what's
2:20:12
it got to do with Russia?
2:20:14
Well, because you know, Russia? Well, of course, this is because
2:20:17
Russia has caused ripples, ripples, ripples in the energy
2:20:22
markets now we need to ripple back at them with Saudi Arabia.
2:20:26
Okay, last clip.
2:20:28
Let's help others from the data perspective. I mean, what's been
2:20:31
the narrative?
2:20:34
I don't know. There's no way. I can't help. But now I'm just
2:20:39
Jide. Let's have
2:20:40
another some of the data perspective. And then what's
2:20:42
been the narrative,