Cover for No Agenda Show 1524: Climatarian
January 26th, 2023 • 3h 2m

1524: Climatarian

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0:00
I think this is the Russians. Adam curry Jhansi Devora
0:04
Thursday, January
0:04
26 2023. This is your award winning give our nation media
0:08
assassination episode 1524. This is no agenda. 90 seconds to
0:14
midnight and we're broadcasting live from the heart of the Texas
0:17
hill country here in orange and number six in the morning,
0:19
everybody. I'm Adam curry
0:21
from Northern Silicon Valley, where we're all wishing
0:25
australia i Happy australia day, January 26 and Jhansi Devorah.
0:32
Buzzkill. But that begs the question, Australia Day, I mean,
0:39
what exactly is Australia Day? Didn't that start off as a penal
0:43
colony? Do they celebrate that?
0:45
They celebrate? Well, they don't celebrate any of it because it's
0:48
white supremacy but
0:51
okay, of course it is because of them,
0:53
by the way is the day after tomorrow actually in Australia.
0:56
So the 26th has gone, but the it celebrates the 1788 landing of
1:04
the first British ship on the shores of Australia.
1:07
So they so they do they celebrate being prisoners,
1:11
though,
1:12
it wasn't the first prison ship. Oh, I thought it was. It was an
1:16
after they landed there. And they said, This place looks
1:20
perfect for prisoners.
1:22
That makes sense. Okay, well, good on your homies. No. Well, I
1:29
mentioned in the opening John, but it is very dire. Once again,
1:32
we're down to the wire. It's bad, bad news everywhere the
1:35
science has spoken.
1:36
Now they call it the doomsday clock. And it symbolizes just
1:40
how close humanity is to self annihilation. Well, the closer
1:44
the clock gets to midnight, the more danger we're all in. Well,
1:47
the sad news is that in a couple of factors have resulted in that
1:51
Doomsday Clock advancing by 10 Second, meaning we're now just
1:56
90 seconds to midnight, that is the closest the clock has ever
1:59
been to midnight midnight.
2:02
I think it was actually I know it was 2021. It was
2:07
Yeah, what 100 100 seconds to midnight, let me say we are
2:11
closer to doomsday than ever before claim to the Bulletin of
2:14
Atomic Scientists, they created the doomsday clock at the
2:17
University of Chicago and base the countdown to midnight, on
2:20
how much time civilization has left.
2:23
That's a little different reports we got here. So like
2:25
before we annihilate ourselves is what they turned it into. Now
2:28
this was this old report was from 2020. That's how much
2:32
civilization has left. Let's talk to a scientist, of course,
2:35
symbolizing the end. Well, let's find out more now from Suzanne
2:39
McKinney, who's a member of the science and security board at
2:42
the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. That's the bulletin,
2:45
which the doomsday clock is set by each year. Now, Susan, thank
2:50
you so much for joining us. You were one of the speakers on
2:52
today's panel, which this rather bleak announcement was made.
2:56
Just tell us how was this decision reached to put the
2:59
clock forward by 10 seconds. Oh, John,
3:01
what do you think the problems are in the world that made the
3:04
clock hop forward? 10 seconds to two ultimate peril and doom?
3:09
cow farts?
3:11
Yeah, that would be one. Yeah, that's my there's a lot. There's
3:13
actually the added one and the one that was added or Sonic
3:16
missiles. Well, good
3:18
evening. And thank you so much for having me. What I can well
3:21
is the science and security board at the Bulletin of the
3:24
Atomic Scientists, we spend a considerable amount of time
3:28
debating and deliberating over the threats and the challenges
3:32
that we are seeing across our global community.
3:35
Man, I love the scientists that just wasting money. And so
3:39
when we were setting the time on the doomsday clock, as always,
3:43
we considered the threat of nuclear war, we consider
3:46
emerging technologies such as biological threats. And we also
3:50
consider climate change as factors that go into the waiting
3:55
of the doomsday clock.
3:56
But wait, there's more. Could there be more
3:58
in addition to those three factors?
4:01
Come on, John, you know what it is?
4:04
A pandemic,
4:06
oh, no, man much.
4:09
Republicans,
4:11
that would have been a good one.
4:12
One of the things that also contributed to the clock moving
4:16
closer to midnight, was the Russian war on the Ukraine. And
4:21
so it
4:21
was a by the way, the scientist says the Ukraine love that.
4:25
Hello, science
4:25
also contributed to the clock moving closer to the midnight
4:30
was the Russian war on the Ukraine, Ukraine. So it was a
4:34
combination of things that cause us to move the clock the closest
4:39
to midnight that it has ever been.
4:41
My question would be what's that really a 10 second move. I mean,
4:43
you could shouldn't have been like an 11 Second. He's morons.
4:49
You know, just heard this.
4:51
Did you hear an American report about this? I didn't get one. I
4:55
got
4:55
a report from it's not on this, but I gotta report it has run
5:00
The old dates real information when we're all going to die, you
5:03
know, on the money stuff instead of this vague
5:07
thing does not from tick tock. Well, I
5:10
mean, but there's a clock involved. Oh, yeah, there's Oh
5:12
yes, there is a clock. I went to my favorite pie or one of my
5:15
favorite podcasts, the Canadian prepper. I have not heard this
5:20
podcast. I haven't heard it either. till last week by what's
5:23
your favorite?
5:23
It's now favorites, a top top.
5:26
So he had on a retired professor named Guy McPherson, who's a
5:32
doomsday guy if there ever was he's out of the University of
5:35
Arizona, and he's a professor emeritus. And I liked the way
5:39
that Canadian prepper pronounces it as M or S or something some
5:44
crazy
5:45
Emeritus, let's say Mr. Register,
5:48
but this guy does. I don't know if the Canadians in general say
5:51
Mr. Rattus. I sincerely doubt it, but I do know there's a lot
5:55
of weird pronunciations. So let's hear and this is just part
5:59
one. The second part we'll have the actual date of our doom.
6:03
I'm looking for this clip. I do not
6:05
I am McPherson. Ah,
6:08
we go. Here we go. Hi, folks. Canadian
6:11
prepper. Here I got a very special guest on the channel
6:13
today, Dr. Guy McPherson. He is Professor Emeritus.
6:19
emeritus. He's an emeritus MRI and
6:23
MRI tiss.
6:24
By the way, your favorite podcast has a great fade out of
6:27
the of the opening tune. That's that's real subtle.
6:31
Preference. Here I got a very special guest on the channel
6:34
today, Dr. Guy McPherson. He is Professor Emeritus of the
6:40
University of Arizona. He studied natural resources,
6:43
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Since we last spoke, I
6:46
think it was four or five years ago, I think it was 20, either
6:49
2018 or 2017. We've had record setting wildfires around the
6:54
world, especially here in Canada, we've seen droughts on
6:57
every continent, we have seen biblical flooding, especially in
7:02
the West of Canada called flooding. We've seen heat waves
7:06
that I've never before seen in my lifetime that touch 54
7:09
degrees here in BC, last year in the town, where it was
7:14
registered, burned down the day afterwards.
7:17
It's good thing we got that recording before the burn down.
7:21
Yes, it's it's otherwise we never would have known right?
7:25
We've had a pandemic, we've had an energy crisis, we've had a
7:28
financial crisis. And of course, now we're on the cusp of world
7:31
war three. So my question to you, Professor is, how much time
7:36
do you think we have left?
7:38
You know, I get asked that almost every day, and I am
7:42
certain that we will lose habitat for human animals.
7:47
Shortly after we have an ice free Arctic Ocean. Now, an ice
7:51
free Arctic Ocean was projected to occur in 2018, plus or minus
7:55
three years, in one of the most renowned and conservative peer
7:59
reviewed journals, the annual review of Earth and Planetary
8:02
Sciences. So I'd say we dodged a few bullets. Did he say human
8:07
animals?
8:08
Yeah, he refers to us as human.
8:10
And that's like MRI notice. Now,
8:14
I've stopped it there because I want to point out that this
8:17
conservative Journal said that we're going to have Arctic ice
8:24
free or ice cream 2018 plus or minus two years or three years,
8:28
three years, and they were off. So somehow we dodged the bullet.
8:32
Well, how about the fact that this prediction was wrong? Does
8:35
anybody consider the possibility that this will be my theme for
8:39
today's show? That the experts were wrong to begin with in this
8:43
whole thing's nonsense, but that's the dress that's
8:47
gonna be your theme for today's show. So that's different from
8:50
anything we ever do any other show?
8:53
I notice I'm in mono, by the way, I don't know if that's
8:56
gonna. People listening.
8:58
Oh, I don't think so. But I want you to feel comfortable. So
9:01
there we go. No, no, no, no. Anyway, so this guy now he goes
9:05
on with the second. The second Yes. second clip is he'll give
9:10
us an actual date of our doom.
9:12
Oh, go get it. Get your calendars out people get your
9:15
day planners,
9:16
we will not have an ice free Arctic this year, according to a
9:19
forecast by the US Naval Postgraduate School. And that
9:23
seems to be quite reliable in its six month ensemble forecast.
9:27
So I think we dodged that bullet this year. Now, there are, of
9:31
course, a few other things that can cause loss of habitat for
9:34
humans, too. And the peer reviewed literature already
9:39
indicates that we are losing habitat for vertebrates. And for
9:42
mammals around the world.
9:44
I'm sorry, what is that for? For birds? What do you say?
9:47
vertebrates? Vertebrates already
9:49
indicates that we are losing habitat for vertebrates, and for
9:53
mammals around the world. So I'd say we're close but naming a
9:58
specific day, you know, I have complete confidence that there
10:01
won't be a human being on the planet in 2030. Oh, I have
10:06
indicated that 2026 is likely to be loss of humans as well.
10:17
Right on let's write that 2030 As if we didn't know it.
10:21
2030 and 20 2060s get the big dates. He's got both of the
10:24
classic numbers that we've been following.
10:26
It's the 2030 Club, which we set up in 2014. Knowing that fully
10:32
well that this will be the date because we actually know stuff.
10:35
I thought it was 2002 I thought was 2027 was that was the was
10:39
the no new new
10:40
big date. Oh,
10:41
I thought I must have been confused but okay. Well, we have
10:45
2030 is our doomsday. That's it. There's the AES confident, and
10:50
he's the expert, that there will not be a human on the planet
10:55
by 2030. Yeah, well, I will say, I will say that the way things
11:03
are going with food, which, of course is being adapted at
11:07
breakneck, breakneck speed. To combat climate change, it's very
11:13
likely if we eat the stuff that they're talking about. That's
11:17
right, we won't be Elijah. Here's a couple of examples.
11:19
You've heard of plant based protein powder. But what if the
11:23
next alternative was made out of plastic and there's new research
11:27
that could make it a reality?
11:28
Alright, CCL cat talks with scientists make it a reality. So
11:32
let's go check it out, since that could help like hunger and
11:35
pollution, liquefied hunger, pollution and life,
11:38
food shortages are worsening around the world. And the
11:41
plastic pollution crisis continues to intensify. What if
11:44
they will
11:45
eat it?
11:47
It's exactly what it is. A it's a twofer. You get rid of the
11:51
plastic, it's actually a three for you get rid of the plastic,
11:54
there'll be no more straws in the turtle's nose. And we all
11:58
die to intensify.
12:00
What if there was one solution to both of these problems, and
12:03
Michigan scientists thinks there could be
12:06
what we're trying to do is to use microbes to take plastic and
12:10
other inedible plant material and turn that into something
12:15
that's nutritious. The idea
12:16
is to turn components of plastic into protein and other nutrients
12:20
like fats and sugars. Yeah,
12:22
this is really the theme is nutritious is going to be
12:26
nutritious. In addition to that, he will also taste great, and it
12:31
will feel good in your mouth.
12:33
It looks and tastes like chicken and it is chicken.
12:38
This is a great report. This is from France 24.
12:42
It looks and tastes like chicken. And it is chicken.
12:46
Except for the fact that it was grown in huge steel that's we
12:49
call the company's sales pitch.
12:53
With this is what is their name, their name is upside meats,
12:57
oh giving it up with nutria or becoming vegetarian or vegan.
13:01
Like I said, it's not a meat alternative. It's meat that's
13:04
grown from real animal cells. So what we do is we take really
13:07
high quality animal cells from let's say, a cow, or a pig, or a
13:11
chicken or a lobster.
13:12
It's new, the lobster is new. I have not heard this on the fake
13:16
meat menu yet. And we
13:17
look for cells that can continue to grow outside the animal in a
13:21
very robust and a healthy way like cancer.
13:25
We're basically eating cancer. Yeah, that's
13:27
a good start.
13:28
It took the company four years to get the green light from the
13:31
US Food and Drug Administration. Now, it's hoping to sell its
13:35
products to restaurants by 2023, and two grocery stores by 2028.
13:41
But first, we'll need further rubber stamps from the US
13:44
Department of Agriculture.
13:45
I love that rubber stamp because yeah, of course, I mean, it's
13:48
already it's kind of good to go. It'll be approved by 2028. So we
13:51
can eat it for two years and then die giving this guy you
13:54
know, kudos. And it's just rubber stamp. It's not like we
13:57
have to approve anything. It's good to go. rubbers rubber
14:01
stamped,
14:01
we think the initial pricing will be premium premium to
14:05
organic premium and we
14:07
get a cost more than the real chicken
14:09
No, wait this. Oh, no, no, no, no, no, this is this is there's
14:14
a Nexus
14:16
here pricing will be premium premium to organic. And we also
14:20
expect the price of conventional meat to continue to grow up
14:23
significantly. It keeps going up cultivated meat price comes down
14:27
and there's a sweet spot in the next five to 10 years where we
14:30
intersect and we become more affordable than conventional
14:33
meat.
14:34
Cultivated meat could also reduce the environmental impact
14:37
of livestock, which are responsible for around 15% of
14:41
the world's greenhouse gas emissions. The EU along with
14:44
Israel and other countries are currently working on a
14:46
regulatory framework for Lummi products.
14:49
There's a term for this. They've come up with a new term
14:54
if you're going to lusion
14:58
climate terian
15:00
Climate terian I love that. Right? I know I
15:03
would love it. Climate there's another one which is regenda
15:09
voere. But I like climate terian better. And as as a new as a
15:13
newly minted climate terian Bubi you'll be inundated with great
15:20
new products for instance, we have carbon neutral, I'm sorry,
15:25
the term is it's called Neutral Milk. It is. It is carbon
15:32
neutral. It is of course data driven. It is funded by data
15:38
data driven milk. Funded by Bill Gates and fellow billionaire
15:42
Mark Cuban. They put $4 million into neutral milk and they have
15:48
a just announced a second round of funding from celebrity
15:52
investors including John Legend LeBron James Kevin Love who's
16:04
the Portland now usual suspects I mean, did you get I want John
16:08
Legend to be drinking this day in day out drink it drink more
16:11
drink more.
16:14
They Oh, that's funny because I have a Bill Gates clip of
16:16
another thing he's doing with cows.
16:18
Let me just give you the price. What do you think this will cost
16:20
a half gallon?
16:21
A half gallon? phony baloney milk should be a buck
16:26
$5.49 a half gallon?
16:29
That's reasonable.
16:32
I think I have the gauge clip as well. So let's play it because
16:35
this is a good one.
16:36
Bill Gates has decided to invest in a way to stop cows from
16:41
burping so much. He's put some 11 million euros into an
16:44
Australian firm ruminate, which is tackling How to Lower methane
16:48
coming from cows specifically from cow burps. For
16:52
surprisingly, surprisingly enough, it is cow's burps, and
16:56
to a lesser degree their flatulence that accounts for
16:59
most of their the methane that they emit.
17:02
Is this surprising to this news model where she been? We all
17:06
know it's flatulence, but we know the burps of the big the
17:09
big bad methane spreader.
17:11
It's why most of these friends 24 Women don't seem to
17:14
understand this.
17:15
Now curbing these bodily functions are important because
17:19
methane has over a 100 year period. It has around 30% more
17:23
of a warming effect and co2. Now the funding from the Gates
17:27
investment firm will help the company work on replacing
17:30
replicating seaweed which has actually been shown to lower
17:34
methane gases in cow burps such an advanced could eventually
17:38
transform some of the dire effects that the red meat
17:41
industry has on the environment. That's fascinating. I knew about
17:45
the flatulence to speak politely but not about the burps is
17:48
actually more burps than flatulence. I knew
17:50
Oh no. Oh, my God is fascinating.
17:54
Oh, no, no, oh my goodness, who knew? Oh, yeah, I've
17:59
got another clip. If you don't have any more
18:02
I will I have that same clip I have. This will be a little
18:06
inter intermezzo. It's from the BBC, and kind of backs up
18:11
everything that we're that we're playing here
18:13
phonology to remove the planet warming greenhouse gas, co2 from
18:17
our atmosphere must be urgently wrapped up. That's according to
18:21
leading climate experts in a new report. It does need some
18:24
explanation. So let's take you to our environment correspondent
18:27
Jonah Fisher. John plan was that we were going to plant a lot
18:30
more trees. That's what we needed to
18:32
do. Oh, no, this is ridiculous. Trees are no good
18:35
rid of co2 in our atmosphere. What are these scientists
18:38
saying? Now? What
18:39
What the scientists are saying is that can only be part of the
18:41
solution that the problem is so severe that and that even if we
18:46
do manage to massively cut the amount of carbon dioxide that
18:50
we're putting into the atmosphere at the moment, that
18:53
nature will not be enough on its own to Karti. So at the moment,
18:57
we have trees, forests, absorbing carbon dioxide from
19:02
the atmosphere, soil under the right conditions, does the same
19:05
thing too. But what these scientists are saying in their
19:07
report is that technology more technology will be needed in the
19:12
future to take more of that carbon dioxide out of the air at
19:16
the moment. These technologies are relatively new, some are in
19:19
the process of being deployed. But effectively what the what
19:22
these scientists are saying is right now we need to be putting
19:25
more money into developing these technologies because further
19:28
down the line 510 20 years down the line, we may well need them
19:31
to get more carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and
19:34
potentially even to try and help reduce global temperatures if
19:38
they've continued to if as expected they continue to heat
19:42
up at an alarming rate.
19:43
Oh, alarming. Mother Nature can't do it herself. John, we
19:47
all know it's
19:47
alarming too. I'll tell you one thing you know that bad
19:50
manufacturing that chicken goo I think that's gonna lay an egg.
19:55
Well, the problem is it the programming is so strong I I can
20:00
easily see over socialized under educated people saying guy you
20:05
know, hey, it's chicken. It's chicken What are you talking
20:09
about? Like you said it's like a cancer cell it's chicken. And
20:12
already the EU has approved for human consumption. I'm reading
20:19
from the article from Deutsche Avella the maggot like larvae of
20:24
lesser mealworms a type of shiny black beetle and house crickets
20:30
will become the third and fourth insects that can be sold as food
20:34
for people in the European Union and eight more applications
20:37
await approval. So if they're going to slip it in anyway
20:43
the poor people in the EU
20:46
Yeah, yeah. That's their perfect example of
20:50
why don't they at least put out a cookbook like the French did
20:53
during the French Revolution on how to eat rats?
20:58
Ah, no, that's disgusting. It was
21:00
a gourmet item during the French no that's that's worked up a lot
21:04
of rat recipes.
21:05
That's disgusting. We want bugs rats are just uncouth. Not
21:10
clean.
21:13
Well listen to this now this is a terrible clip in terms of the
21:16
quality but I think he can understand it. This is the Eat
21:19
Your Dog
21:20
clip. Try to hold on TV don't listen. Okay, and
21:28
taking it to an extreme and this is all based on W E F
21:31
recommendations which include a lot of screwball things. When
21:36
mainly get rid of your pets that are causing climate change.
21:40
The W E F, which has ordered mainstream media outlets to
21:42
begin pushing the narrative wants to introduce an
21:45
international policy that would require the majority of pet
21:48
owners to euthanize their animals. CNN always at the
21:52
forefront in pushing the globalist agenda has begun
21:55
urging its viewers to starve their pets to death. In an
21:58
effort to combat climate change. CNN published an article on
22:02
their website recently entitled our pets are part of the climate
22:06
problem. These tips can help you minimize their carbon
22:09
footprints. In the article The liberal sadist, CNN argue that
22:12
the meat heavy diet of many household pairs is causing
22:15
planet warming gases to be released into the atmosphere.
22:19
responsible pet owners should trade in their best friend for a
22:22
turtle for the planet. snakes, turtles and reptiles are really
22:26
low impact. CNN suggests your kitty cat and pooch CNN explains
22:31
are going to have to eat bugs just like you assuming Klaus
22:35
Schwab allows you to keep them at all in the future. Bloomberg
22:38
another mouthpiece for the global elites jumped onto the
22:41
bandwagon at the same time urging pet owners to let their
22:44
pets die to fight inflation. Hollywood celebrity Emma
22:48
Thompson has gone even further telling pet owners to eat their
22:52
own paths to fight the so called climate crisis.
22:55
I need a clip of Emma Thompson saying eat your dog. Or I've got
22:59
to find your pussy. I mean either one she's we want you to
23:02
clip of her saying something about eating your pet. This is
23:06
wrong. But listen, this is Yahoo Yahoo News, by
23:11
the way is belated for you. Hey, go. Yahoo what
23:17
Yahoo News which is taken directly from Reuters. So you
23:21
know when it's on Reuters, that's when that's where the
23:23
programming starts. It's it's the official news service.
23:27
Reuters, Washington, you writers. Once the stuff of
23:30
science fiction lab grown meat could become reality in some
23:33
restaurants in the United States as early as this year. Now, we
23:37
know that these lab grown meat outfits have been working with
23:44
herders. In a show of confidence. Some of now I'll
23:47
read the whole thing. Executives at cultivated meat companies are
23:49
optimistic that meat grown in massive steel vats could be on
23:52
the menu within months after one company wants to go ahead from a
23:55
key regulator in a show of confidence and pay off money.
23:59
Some of them assigned up high end chefs like Argentine Francis
24:03
Melman and Spaniard, Jose undress, to eventually showcase
24:07
the meats in their high end eateries. See this is this and I
24:11
don't know if it'll work, but they thought the COVID with
24:14
celebrities was so successful, that they're doing the celebrity
24:18
chefs, they're gonna have celebrities, like the ones we
24:21
talked with, with the Bill Gates milk, they're going to have they
24:26
think that celebrities will push it on people and those people
24:30
will buy it hook line and sinker. It works. I think it
24:34
does to
24:36
to know in fact, it's always worked as the influencers I
24:39
mean, that's why they pay we don't even know who becomes semi
24:43
famous amongst a certain crowd. Yeah, it'll work in the Jose
24:47
Andrus will do anything for money. You know him. I've seen
24:50
him on TV. I don't have never met him. That's close enough.
24:54
But he looks like he's one of those, you know, he's a good
24:57
shape. He's a good chef. That is a promoter. Yeah, yeah. And me
25:02
to show me the money
25:03
when Gordon Ramsay falls for it, then I know it'll all be over. I
25:08
don't think good.
25:10
With Gordon boy, they'd have to really throw a lot of money at
25:13
him. I
25:13
think he would ultimately do it for money, don't you think?
25:16
Yeah, I think he
25:18
would do it. Although I think he might ultimately figure you can
25:21
make more money by by railing against it. Well, as you pan, I
25:25
think the idea that you're eating a tumor. Basically,
25:31
they're growing, the only thing you can grow by itself is a
25:33
tumor. I think that's one good countermeasure that would work
25:37
for promotional purposes. Would you like a tumor? With your
25:43
fried with the rich like french fries with your tumor?
25:50
We need a better word than tumor. What's what's even worse
25:52
than tumor
25:53
to a tumor is a good word for something that's repulsive.
25:57
Would you
25:57
like Tumeric with your tumor today, man. So in the Climate
26:04
Change Game, a couple of things are taking place that would that
26:06
of course we have to just deal with because climate change, the
26:10
Netherlands is now shutting down pretty much the largest gas
26:15
field in Europe, which was north of off the coast of the
26:19
Netherlands thronging it.
26:21
They're shutting down. Wait, before I continue, I don't think
26:24
I heard you right. during a crisis because of Ukraine and
26:28
Russia and cutting off all gas supplies, and one of the
26:31
pipelines being blowed up. They decided to stop producing gas
26:35
Correct? Ah,
26:37
the Dutch go RT, the Dutch government plans to close the
26:40
Froning and gas field this year, despite Europe's precarious
26:43
supply, position, cloning, it is the largest gas field in Europe.
26:47
The field is dangerous a government official from The
26:50
Hague, the Financial Times, and the government has no plans to
26:54
boost production from it. We won't open up more because of
26:58
the safety issues is politically totally unviable. But apart from
27:02
what I'm not going to do it because it means that you
27:05
increase the chances of earthquakes. Now this is what's
27:08
hilarious. For 15 years, people who live there, including voyage
27:12
zero, had complained about their houses breaking apart from the
27:17
earthquakes from the from the gas storage, and they you know,
27:20
they drill holes, and they said they're fracking. And now now
27:25
all of a sudden, no, we can't have this news as to stop.
27:29
So wait a minute. So what you're saying is the timeline is that
27:32
this has been going on forever. And these earthquakes have been
27:35
annoying everybody. But now that there's a shortage? Let's shut
27:40
up doing that shut them
27:41
down. Yes. Well, in addition to that, just as a fun throw away,
27:48
the British Parking Association is having a very big problem
27:52
with the weight of electric cars causing collapses of parking
27:55
garages.
27:58
That was especially the you know, those they have a lot of
28:01
those garages, especially in Europe, I think we have them
28:04
here too, but not as many where they have whether you drive your
28:07
car under load, lot, conveyor and it Jacks it up into the air.
28:12
And then they they stack these cars in a small area. And
28:14
they're all kind of stacked up those things. Probably have
28:17
weight limitations, they'll pancake
28:19
beautifully. Just like tower seven. And the final one, I have
28:28
two things I say oh yes. This already happened in China. But
28:32
now Microsoft is of course going to help suppress climate change.
28:37
Now we've got to we've got to bring down the temperature. So
28:40
they've announced that gamers have the Xbox console as a part
28:47
as in order to fight climate change. They will end
28:52
Microsoft's intention to become zero waste, they will
28:55
automatically be switching gamers into shutdown mode to
28:58
conserve energy. So they will shut
29:02
this as you're about to win the game and kill the opponent and
29:07
get all kinds of accolades. It'll shut down on you
29:10
but the good news is for every two consoles that switched to
29:15
shut down for one year will save the equivalent amount of carbon
29:20
removed by one tree planted and grown for a decade. So you're
29:25
actually growing a mythical tree by by not playing your game or
29:33
these guys that's the it's not a big deal except for Office is
29:37
not a huge moneymaker. X Xbox isn't a really big for them.
29:42
I think it is doing quite well with it. Yeah,
29:44
I know. So they want to I want to think about that. Just seems
29:50
idiotic. Yes. It's a great time to be a gamer until it's not
29:59
alright, okay. All right. Well, I
30:00
guess that's clarify climate, right?
30:03
Yes, I think it does. I think it does. Finish on climate change
30:07
your dog. It's my favorite thing. Yeah,
30:09
I was a good one. All right. Well, the obvious the obvious
30:14
next move seems to be oh, wait, actually, I should play these
30:20
these two last clips. These are kind of short.
30:22
In tonight's Healthwatch we have important information for
30:25
parents about baby food. The FDA today proposed new levels for
30:29
lead in baby foods cutting the allowable level by about 25%.
30:34
How about no lead in baby food? Is that a concept
30:38
which led to doing and baby food? That's what I'd like to
30:41
know. Well, they're not going to explain
30:42
allowable level by about 25% to 20 parts per billion or less now
30:47
that would apply to baby foods made with fruits, vegetables and
30:50
dry cereals, but not cereal puff and teething biscuits, which
30:54
have been found to have some of the highest lead levels. The
30:58
author of a 2019 report that found dangerous levels of lead
31:01
in nearly 95% of manufactured baby food says the FTAs
31:05
proposals don't go far enough to protect children. But at least
31:10
now you know,
31:11
maybe not feed your your child manufactured baby food. Just a
31:16
thought doesn't really know where this
31:19
lead is coming from. I think from the from the background
31:23
lead that exists in all fruits and vegetables are what we don't
31:26
don't explain anything. This is a terrible report. But that's
31:29
mediocre network gave you that report.
31:32
CBS CBS Nora O'Donnell CBS ABC gave me this one
31:36
farming group is calling for a federal investigation into the
31:40
soaring price of eggs to look for potential price gouging. The
31:44
biggest egg producer call main foods reportedly posted a major
31:48
increase in quarterly profits compared to a year ago. But
31:50
producers say bird flu along with higher demand are driving
31:53
prices higher. Bird flu has killed nearly 58 million
31:56
chickens and turkeys since last March. experts aren't even sure
32:00
how much longer the outbreak will last.
32:03
Mimi has some thoughts on this she's working on a piece
32:06
oh good to participate all I promote I hope the excellent
32:09
outstanding too many eggs book now available to many eggs.com
32:13
for free.
32:15
I couldn't have said it better. Odds are it's what we do for
32:17
each other John. So she says that one of the big egg
32:23
producers might be responsible for this date for this bullcrap.
32:26
It may be the whole thing may be rigged.
32:28
Wait a minute, that's what I said. And you excoriated me for
32:30
that. I
32:31
did. I'm here to apologize.
32:34
Where's Mimi's apology? I want she told you what was going on?
32:41
And you put me in my place. You're wrong. I don't know where
32:45
that comes from. Well, it doesn't matter because we need
32:50
to stop eating eggs because and I'm sure you've seen this is a
32:53
good one blood blue compound found in eggs linked to an
32:57
enhanced risk of blood clotting.
33:00
Yeah, it could be because there's no reason that the VAX
33:03
is causing this problem. Oh, it's
33:05
eggs, man. It's the eggs. Yeah, it's crazy. The eggs? Let me see
33:17
if I have anything else on the eggs.
33:19
I think we've run out yes,
33:21
we have run out of week but we could move out a plug in there
33:24
though we could Well, let's move to some some adverse events. You
33:29
know it. It truly is amazing how many how much excess death there
33:36
is all over the world. I mean, really all over the world. It's
33:41
just and people are flabbergasted by it. And you
33:44
know, obviously because of the lockdowns and COVID Fatal
33:47
cardiac
33:48
arrests in Australia are on the rise. Doctors say COVID damaging
33:52
effect on the heart is driving serious cardiovascular problems.
33:56
More than 10,000 Australians died of heart disease in the
34:00
first eight months of 2020 to 17%. Higher than expected in a
34:04
normal year. disease experts say these statistics are concerning.
34:09
But not a surprise.
34:11
Not a surprise. Let us know nice.
34:14
Don't get surprised. There was the My wife is talking to one of
34:19
their planning commission meetings to somebody she ran
34:21
into this character when it
34:23
was she she she's still in local government up there. Yeah, I
34:26
look at the fools. I pity them who have to go up against me,
34:29
me.
34:30
So she runs into this guy who is a house mover. And because we
34:37
have this little house that JC and Jesse live in my mom's old
34:42
house, and it's a small bungalow, but if you could jack
34:45
it up and put a whole new floor underneath is the way to go is
34:48
instead of adding on this way you shouldn't find a place and
34:52
your jacket up a floor and then put another house
34:57
the whole house up so you don't have to have to request planning
34:59
permission
35:01
You still have to, I think they're still planning issues.
35:03
But it's not as not. It's cheaper. It's by far cheaper
35:08
backing up your house is cheaper. It's like way cheaper
35:12
because of the roof. Oh, you put a roof on a house, it's very as
35:16
expensive as busy building a floor. Yes. And according to
35:20
this guy who's the expert, because he's been moving houses
35:23
and his dad has been moving houses, their house movers. They
35:26
say the one of the greatest ways to get a house is to find
35:30
somebody has to do is going to tear down a house and buy the
35:33
house and move it to a piece of property and throw in a sewer
35:37
and get a power to it. And you can buy some of these houses
35:40
that are going to be demolished, and find what occurs not a piece
35:44
of crap, but something that's still reasonably in good shape.
35:46
You can buy these things for like $200 the house because the
35:52
demolition price is so high, right? It's cheaper than
35:56
demolishing to get rid of the house that houses pulled away
35:59
from the by the House Movers and dropped someplace else. This is
36:02
the way to go. I can't wait to do that.
36:07
If you don't mind, I'll pump the brakes on that one.
36:10
But you can pump the brakes all you want because I don't think
36:12
you need a house. But I'm just it's it would be part of a
36:15
housing shortage. A solution? And and it's turns out that the
36:23
that there's laws been put in place. So if your house has
36:26
moved there now they're making the you have to inspect it as
36:29
though it was a new house, which is causing issues in some
36:32
municipality. How
36:33
do we get from people dying? And I'll get I'm
36:35
sorry, I went I went on that kind of a long sidetrack. The
36:38
guy says to her, he says, Did you ever get the vaccine? She
36:42
says no. And he says, Well, I did. And I've got myocarditis.
36:47
Yay. And he says, You know what? He says, what really pisses me
36:53
off is not the myocarditis as much as the fact that I was
36:56
suckered into getting this.
36:59
Well, here's, there's a CDC report, apparently, I've not
37:03
confirmed it myself. That 118,000 Young people youth died
37:12
after receiving their vaccine. Global Life, which is a life
37:18
insurance company, I think. Stock GL on the New York Stock
37:25
Exchange. They say hi, excess claims are ahead. So I don't
37:31
know if that's a short or not, I don't want to recommend
37:33
anything. But
37:35
if there was jack up the prices to make them probably will.
37:39
Here's one disability data reveals alarming health crisis
37:43
of the employed. And this is kind of interesting, because the
37:47
the Federal Reserve and in the United States, the central bank,
37:51
they they use unemployment as a I think as a kind of a big
37:55
indicator, whether inflation is going down or not. And they just
37:59
can't get that to go down because maybe there's not enough
38:02
people to work at all.
38:04
Well, I have three work reports related. I don't know if this
38:08
has anything to do with what you're going to talk about, but
38:10
this is the job engagement problems in the United States. I
38:14
have two clips. Yeah, let's do
38:15
that. And then we'll just remind me to go back to where I was.
38:18
No, you'll remember Yeah.
38:21
Okay, job engagement in the USA
38:23
Here we go. American workplaces have a problem. A growing number
38:27
of people just aren't bad into their jobs. Is
38:30
this NPR? Yeah, fantastic to just I can't
38:33
use NTD anymore, which has obscure stories American buddy
38:38
apologizes to me now what? Who, me? The artists how the
38:43
artists John's all pissed off.
38:45
American workplaces have a problem a growing number of
38:48
people just aren't bad into their jobs. A new Gallup report
38:52
finds less than a third of people are engaged with their
38:55
work. As it appears Andrea Chu reports. That is not just an
38:59
issue for workers, it could hurt their companies. This drop
39:03
in employee engagement started in the pandemic and it's only
39:07
getting worse. Jim Harter is gallops chief workplace
39:10
scientist.
39:11
The younger workers in particular, are less connected
39:14
to their organization less satisfied with their
39:16
organization overall, young
39:18
millennials and Gen Zers reported feeling less cared for
39:21
at work less heard fewer of them. Development, fewer have a
39:26
best friend at work harder says that's become an important
39:30
predictor of whether someone might recommend their company
39:32
the word consider looking for a different job.
39:35
Having a friend at work matters more now than it did pre
39:37
pandemic
39:38
Gallup found engagement fell most among people who could work
39:41
remotely but have to work on site. But the survey found
39:45
another problem with fully remote workers. A growing number
39:48
of them are now in a middle zone that Jim harder equates to quiet
39:51
quitting the show up to the minimum required but not much
39:54
else. And they'll still look for other opportunities out there.
39:57
These findings don't surprise Tanvi Sinha. She's in audit
40:00
manager at the accounting firm Matthews Carter and voice in
40:03
Fairfax, Virginia. She started her career back when everyone
40:06
was in the office every day, even Saturdays and the busy
40:09
season
40:09
you develop that, that relationship with people, you
40:13
make friends with people you're spending most of the time at
40:16
work, you're going out for lunches. So those are the things
40:21
that you're missing. You know, now that coming
40:23
to the office is optional. But it's not just about being social
40:27
synopses, it can help your career to get a holistic view of
40:30
your company
40:31
working remotely. You're working on one project, you don't even
40:34
know what kind of other projects your firm does, or what kind of
40:38
other people you can do working with you have very little
40:41
exposure.
40:43
Yeah, I think we saw this happening. And we understand
40:45
certainly younger people who, you know, maybe their first or
40:49
second job out of the gate, which may not be exactly what
40:52
they want, you know, career wise. They were at home working
40:55
on computers, and very disassociated from everything.
40:59
And also, there was too much money, you know, you got STEMI
41:02
checks everywhere you get, I think in New York, even in
41:05
Texas, if you aren't on unemployment insurance, which
41:09
was three months, I guess, it's on par with 65 to $70,000 a year
41:14
salary. So you know, the best thing you can get us fired from
41:17
something so I might as well just be quiet quitting and be a
41:20
douche. Get fired, get three months unemployment go back to
41:23
work. This has now become, I think just a way of the world.
41:28
And what they really need is they need a good depression.
41:35
A lot of people like, I don't even know if that's going to
41:38
help them. I think part of the problem is, is the work ethic,
41:43
which was created we've been called you can't get a job I
41:46
when I was a kid, oh, here we go. We go. Here we go.
41:51
Hey, people come for the deconstruction they stay for
41:53
your stories.
41:55
When I was a kid, you could get work. I was a paperboy with two
42:00
routes. I had a shopper route in a daily newspaper route. And
42:04
that was when I was in grammar school. And then when I was in
42:07
high school, you know you would get summer jobs in factories,
42:11
paying you good paying union, as Biden would put it paying you
42:14
and John union jobs in a factory during the summer for three
42:18
months at work. And you'd have enough money allotted. I knew a
42:22
tiny kid and a couple of kids in high school, they bought new
42:26
cars. One of them had a Corvette in high school. And he got it
42:30
from working, you know, summer jobs in part time, because you
42:33
could get these jobs. And then you would get kind of you could
42:36
see the benefits of having the jobs Corvette. And you would you
42:41
would keep this ethos in your system and you would work for
42:45
money. And you did work for satisfaction. Oh, I'm getting a
42:49
job so I could feel satisfied. You weren't working for
42:52
satisfaction so you could feel good about yourself and and you
42:56
felt part of society, the sheep job that wasn't paying enough?
43:00
No, you wanted to make good money, not for satisfaction, but
43:04
say goodbye stuff that is over.
43:07
Yep. And but also you did not have a credit card. You did not
43:12
have the easy access to credit that people have today. So you
43:18
either had the money or you check it you either hit checks,
43:21
either had the money or you didn't and you want a Corvette
43:25
and there's not going to be on layaway bro is not going to be
43:28
on well layaway actually did exist. Of course, you had no
43:31
credit. So that's another part of the problem. When I was a
43:36
kid, here we go. I too had a paper route when I was 15 and I
43:42
would illegally ride the moped around town and along the Amstel
43:47
dike, which is where a lot of
43:49
you had it. I had to drive a pedal bike. No, I was
43:53
doing it illegally. But I did it for in the morning. Now of
43:56
course newspaper delivery is no longer a job. So we have to we
44:00
can't really use that. But I did do other things. Such as I
44:05
worked on farms, I gathered potatoes and turnips. I worked
44:10
in the Rose nursery where you'd sort the roses. And my favorite
44:15
job was a with a blacksmith. I learned how to shoot horses,
44:20
which is again it's not really a modern job anymore, but I also
44:23
worked for betches Bard mum and I would help fix cars. I would
44:28
help. I was extremely good at taking a Volkswagen Beetle
44:31
engine out by myself within 20 minutes getting in is a whole
44:35
different deal. But also those jobs are also not there anymore.
44:38
You can't get a you can't be a mechanic for modern cars. You
44:42
can't do anything to them without the whole diagnostics
44:46
kit and everything and even they could
44:48
date you for example at the high school up in Port Angeles are
44:51
taking daughter shop class out because it cost him imagine
44:55
where you need to teach gender studies. Yes, this is a taking
44:59
that out of And yes, you do need to, but that's what the auto
45:02
shop class should would have provided. They'd have all those
45:06
fancy machines and read outs and smog devices that things that
45:13
tell you how much you have your cars qualifies in California.
45:16
And I think
45:16
we're discovering here that every single job you and I had
45:20
as kids, pretty much no longer exists. And we're shooting does
45:25
exist. It's not as big as it was back then a per delivery does
45:29
exist very small, very small. Operation, okay. But
45:34
there's other things that have cropped up in the mean,
45:36
you can't work at McDonald's because your mom already works
45:39
there.
45:40
Which reminds me, by the way, so I'm watching the youtubes. And
45:44
they're like, thank you. I got that. I know she never got
45:49
delayed an egg joke, so never even Yeah. So I'm watching this
45:55
this in Texas. There's a YouTube video of this automated
45:59
McDonald's. Yes, that is just a robot McDonald's. Yeah. Hello.
46:03
Have you seen this? Yes. And you know why is because everyone
46:05
said I want $25 An hour they went, Okay. Look at look at my
46:10
robot. But
46:11
here's the thing. So I was go and I've noticed this because a
46:14
couple of times, I've gotten a Mac Cafe because there's like
46:17
you get the giant one for the same price as the little one.
46:20
And if I'm like feeling the low caffeine caffeine hit I met stop
46:24
at a McDonald's and pick one up through the drive thru, or an
46:27
ice cream cone. If it's hot, I'll do that too. And even
46:30
though they're overpriced now, so I don't do it anymore. But I
46:33
noticed this about some months back they said I'm at a window
46:38
ordering through the drive thru and they said, Would you like to
46:41
order that on your phone? At the drive thru? At the drive thru?
46:47
And I'm saying no,
46:49
we hear we sound like two douche boomers right now. We need to be
46:54
productive. This is not helping that we're arguing.
46:59
Douche Boomer thing. We're going to be that anyway. I'm thinking
47:03
this was all part of the strategy to get even though
47:06
you're already there. You can just what's the Why do I need to
47:09
use my phone for this is to get people to use us to using the
47:13
phones that the robots can serve you? Yes, yes, me? Yes, you can
47:20
buy a McDonald's for the cash. If it's a robot,
47:23
John, we have a lovely little town here. Fredericksburg,
47:27
Texas. Stores are and restaurants have been closing.
47:31
For one reason. And one reason only they cannot get people to
47:35
work. They can't get them to work. They can't get them. Now
47:39
granted, there's also very little affordable housing here.
47:44
But they can come in from Kerrville you can come in from
47:46
other places and it's not like traveling half an hour is an
47:50
outrage to get to work. But they don't want to and this How long
47:56
have we talked about universal basic income this is just where
47:59
it has to go. This is that this is the this is the strategy
48:02
because the lawyer you won't even need lawyers anymore. You
48:07
don't need a doctor you got you got a telemedicine where a
48:11
provider will talk to you and then prescribe some pills. And
48:15
all these jobs are the end is nine. You know what we may be
48:20
2030 Man and be dead. The
48:23
Gallup survey backs that up across age groups and no matter
48:26
where people were working, it found that employees were less
48:29
connected to the broader purpose of their companies also less
48:32
clear about what's expected of errors. Tim harder says that's
48:36
worrisome.
48:37
You can almost equate it to employees becoming a little bit
48:40
more like gig workers who aren't
48:41
as loyal to their employers who aren't in it for the long haul.
48:45
I believe that companies are having a reckoning
48:47
Stephanie Francis is Chief People Officer at Lyra health,
48:50
which provides mental health services to companies with all
48:53
the quiet and we'll quitting going on. She says companies are
48:57
now realizing that workers want something different.
48:59
I just gotta stop for a second because the troll room is
49:02
saying, Yeah, who wants to drive 30 miles for 295 an hour? Excuse
49:07
me. $22 An hour plus tips for a waitress in a diner or waiter.
49:13
Okay, so do get your facts straight and expect something
49:17
different.
49:17
We're going to return where what work means is being redefined.
49:21
And it's being challenged. Right. What worked in the past
49:23
isn't going to work. And what makes it hard is that no one
49:26
truly has a playbook
49:27
fria says focusing on wellness is key to her engagement and
49:32
retention. What she's hearing from workers is this
49:36
I still want to engage in the workplace but I want to do it in
49:38
a way that is convenient and palatable
49:41
note Oh boy.
49:42
The accounting firm were timely sent how works is trying to find
49:46
a good balance. People aren't required to be in the office but
49:49
managers like Sinhagad do encourage their teams to come in
49:53
and preferably on the same days
49:55
pick a few days you know mingle with people talk to people
49:58
synthesize techniques. She can help. She does set up regular
50:02
video calls with our team members to check in. But even
50:05
so, there are pitfalls,
50:07
some people who are hired in COVID. I mean, I went to work
50:10
after a long time, and I couldn't even recognize that
50:12
this is the person. So So that's bad. And my partner,
50:18
Jim harder at Gallup says good managers are now more important
50:21
than ever. They're the ones who can make sure employees know
50:25
what's expected of them, and help employees feel cared for.
50:28
Yeah, there's a lot of this via my work doesn't, doesn't
50:33
determine who I am. I've heard this a lot.
50:36
Well, that's a plus. Because that's true. Yeah. But what is
50:40
this these comments that are in here like they, at the end,
50:43
there was something but there's first of all, I want to aren't
50:47
connected
50:47
in my next life. I want to be a chief people officer. That's for
50:50
sure. That sounds like a great, yeah, Chief, the
50:52
people have
50:54
a great job.
50:55
And this woman she has a lot of employees don't feel connected
50:59
to the broader purpose of the company. When was this? When has
51:04
that ever been a criteria? I working for Ford Motor Company,
51:08
I'm on the assembly line, I'm putting a bolt on and I had to I
51:11
feel like I'm not connected the broader purpose? Well, you kind
51:15
of are.
51:15
So this all happened when HR came into play human resources,
51:20
which we've always laughed at Human Resource before Human
51:24
Resources was really a big thing. You know, we would laugh
51:30
about it, because that's all you are a resource who's barely
51:32
human. Okay, everyone loves it, because human resources and I'm
51:36
burnt out. I don't feel good. I saw this happen in the
51:40
Netherlands. When I was growing up because of the socialized
51:44
healthcare system. You could get literally, the Dutch before they
51:49
can even speak English the way they do today, because it's
51:51
improved over many decades. Yes, it kept in burnout. Given
51:56
burnout, burnout, and burnout. I have to stay home for three
52:01
months. I got to burnout. It was oh, I'm so sorry to hear that.
52:04
You got to burn out. Yeah. Yeah, you should stay home and you get
52:08
to, I think 80% of your of your paycheck or turnouts go to
52:12
burnout. You can't
52:13
go in and sit in the chair. I mean, what it would burn out
52:16
you're talking about here.
52:18
I'm just telling you what I witnessed. Yeah, I'm
52:21
sure you did. And I think it's I did make I like to know what the
52:24
genesis of this as it has to be in the 60s. Man, do your own
52:29
thing.
52:30
No, it's not. It's It's the it's the system. It's been planned. I
52:36
think. It's just what are we going to do with all these
52:41
people? Well, we got a, I don't know, get it. Get them on an
52:45
app.
52:47
On an app by their burgers on their phone,
52:52
which is so healthy for you. Everything is bad. Get your your
52:56
cell meat. Get your culture your meat on your phone. Well, I'm
53:01
glad we'll be dead by 2030. Will we be dead? No, we'll be alive.
53:04
Probably. We're all be dead by say hello. Well, back to my
53:08
original story. From science alert.com Your blood type may
53:14
affect your risk of an early stroke.
53:17
Oh, yeah, that's it. Okay, let it get the chicken eggs. Let's
53:20
move that off the agenda and go to something else.
53:24
People with one of the type A blood groups appear to be more
53:27
appear to be more likely to have a stroke before the age of 60.
53:31
Compared with our actually something very sad. Very sad
53:36
news this morning. Yes, this is this and I was shocked.
53:41
Moreover, because this was not a vaccine. Death. But our dear
53:48
friend, producer and founder, Jeff Jeff Morgan of the no
53:54
agenda tea club. 58 years old. died suddenly. Yeah. And very
54:01
sad. Have I just received a new shipment from him. We had a back
54:04
and forth it was. I was shocked. I was really shocked. Very, very
54:09
soon as
54:09
going someplace where this Teton Yeah,
54:11
in Portugal. So love and light brother and the family and his
54:18
girlfriend of was it she was his girlfriend for 36 years, I
54:22
think. Yeah. Mate, but his was family were very, very quick to
54:28
point out that he was not vaccinated. So you can just die.
54:32
You know, it does happen. Not everything is evacs. Not
54:35
everything. Now, there is one other way you can die. And
54:42
that's by living in a Republican state.
54:45
A preprint of a new study that analyzes data from Florida and
54:48
Ohio shows that since vaccines became available,
54:51
by the way, it's not a vaccine, it's a vaccine. Just so you
54:54
know.
54:55
Isn't this Hayes
54:57
that's Hayes and he said vaccine. He said Becky that
55:00
analyzes
55:00
data from Florida and Ohio shows that since vaccines became
55:04
available vaccines and this has been going on essentially, since
55:08
vaccines first became widely available, it's gotten worse
55:11
rates. He says it again. Here we go. Right. That's the key.
55:13
Right? Right. excess deaths in Republican voting counties are
55:17
more than 150% Greater than those in democratic counties.
55:22
The author's note and quote the gap in excess death rates
55:25
between Republicans and Democrats is concentrated in
55:27
counties with low vaccination rates and only materializes
55:30
after vaccines become widely available.
55:34
The finally fixes at the end their vaccines, what's wrong
55:37
with him? Vaccines
55:41
kind of see what he was, what he was on. He was alluding to when
55:46
he saw this bhcc ind on a teleprompter that he's reading
55:50
from what was he thinking?
55:51
I think there's there's a job for a young person replaced
55:55
Chris Hayes. He's losing it.
55:59
Very sad.
56:00
He's lost a long time ago. He's He's lost and he's really rather
56:04
a rudderless ship without his mentor. working all the time.
56:10
Now part of us just starting the air part of
56:13
the problem, which will only get worse as technology. We're just
56:18
going back to why people don't work can't work don't want to
56:22
work. And it wouldn't be a no agenda show without hyping up
56:28
the dangers of chat GPT at UPenn prestigious
56:32
Wharton Business School A b b minus on an exam is pretty good.
56:36
But a computer getting that grade using artificial
56:39
intelligence is jaw dropping. That computer put to use
56:42
knowledge that analysts managers and consultants get paid big
56:46
money for. Although it struggled with sixth grade math. At the
56:50
University of Minnesota Law School chat GPT averaged a c
56:53
plus on long exams. Although professors noticed suspiciously
56:57
perfect grammar. New York City and Seattle school systems have
57:01
banned its use on department devices. And why you set up a
57:05
task force within a week to do with it.
57:09
Now you go chat GPT chat up to
57:14
you. Sounds like somebody
57:18
also, when you think about a job, what are the great jobs
57:23
that we know what's out is Teacher lame ass teachers.
57:27
What's out is police. Are you kidding me? You're not gonna be
57:29
a cop? Are you? No, no, no firemen and not so. Now I think
57:35
there's still people who want to be a doctor or a dentist or a
57:38
nurse. Maybe a hot librarian. But really the jobs are sports
57:45
star
57:46
sports wanted hot librarian,
57:50
sports star, you know, basketball, influencer. I mean,
57:55
this is the obvious job. Influencer is a big job. And
58:00
absolutely, it's a huge job. So, you know, that's what that's
58:05
what the kids see. I want to be like that guy on him or her on
58:08
Instagram and, and and when I say hot librarian The reason I
58:13
say that is because everyone uses the filters on the tick
58:16
tock and the reels and in the Instagram. So you can look hot,
58:21
but not if you go out. You can not only look hot at home, and
58:27
here's another one makeup tips, how to how to do your makeup,
58:30
how to do cooking. Everyone is so creative. I mean, there's so
58:34
many jobs in these tech firms, which I will say is going away.
58:41
I unloaded the theory on Rogen Wednesday, which is on yesterday
58:46
about tick tock very, very polarizing theory to a lot of
58:51
people. What was the theory? What we have is that tic tock is
58:56
in the problem is not China is that they're eating Silicon
58:59
Valley's learned Oh, yeah,
59:00
no, that's Yep. Da David Foley, David Foley said,
59:03
Dude, you're that bit is trending on Tik Tok? Well, of
59:07
course, of course it is. But people like no man that it's
59:11
China is China.
59:12
Well, okay, that brings me joy as you change the subject. That
59:15
brings me to the point of a question that showed up on the
59:17
no agenda social. You had a chunk of your interview, leaped
59:22
out.
59:24
It was great. It was almost a Monty Python skit. And what
59:29
happened is, we were talking about centralized another
59:35
polarizing thing. When I say hey, man, Elon Musk himself, has
59:39
said that he wants to turn Twitter into x.com He wants to
59:44
build a better PayPal, we've played the clips, he has
59:46
verbatim said that. And, and I said hey, could be his own coin
59:52
or could be the central bank digital currency. And I say that
59:55
based on the fact that everything he does turns into a
59:57
government project everything thing as far as I know, oh, no,
1:00:03
you can't say that about Elon. Oh, no. So, yeah. Because you
1:00:07
can't say and Joe was the one who said, Oh, you So Elon could
1:00:10
be a Trojan horse. So yes, possible. I didn't even say it.
1:00:14
Two people are pissed off at me because Elon Yeah, he's the man.
1:00:19
And so I was talking about Mastodon, and said, there's a
1:00:22
difference between someone getting kicked off of Twitter
1:00:25
and off of these centralized systems. And Mastodon said, when
1:00:28
I kick someone off our own server for being a dick on our
1:00:31
own server, they can take their followers and stuff and you
1:00:35
know, they don't lose anything. And don't take away your right
1:00:39
to speech, you can just do it somewhere else. And then I gave
1:00:42
an example of the guy that I kicked off recently, and I gave,
1:00:46
I've said, the three words that I took issue with, not that
1:00:49
those three words are a big problem. But if that's all
1:00:51
you're doing all day long, I'm not interested. And when we were
1:00:57
done with the interview, Joe pretty much said, Look, man, if
1:01:01
we leave that word in that, then it will either become the entire
1:01:07
focus of what we what we talked about. And probably Spotify will
1:01:11
take it off. He didn't say that in those terms, but it would be
1:01:14
a problem. And you can't just drop the audio because I think
1:01:19
they create transcripts automatically. And then, you
1:01:23
know, I actually said, Well, why don't you blow up my mouth, drop
1:01:25
the audio. It'll be hilarious. No one will know what I said.
1:01:28
There was kind of my idea. But the funny thing was, it happened
1:01:32
as we were talking about censorship. And just before an
1:01:35
ad played, it was it was like Monty Python esque. I thought it
1:01:39
I thought it turned out pretty good.
1:01:41
That's hilarious. Are you being facetious? No, I think it's very
1:01:46
funny. Because the point is that the reason that he's on Spotify
1:01:50
is because he's going to be censored. To some degree,
1:01:53
Cherie. Yeah. Okay, because it's really like mainstream media,
1:01:57
you can't have certain things you just can't do you. Not
1:01:59
allowed. But why is it not allowed? Because of advertisers?
1:02:03
Exactly. There's no other reason. I mean, in a normal, if
1:02:08
it was a value for value model, you do what you want. And then
1:02:12
if you don't like it, they just stop supporting the show, which
1:02:15
is what's happening to us. And which is pointing that out,
1:02:20
because our donations are lagging and month of January.
1:02:25
But that's different than an advertiser telling you what to
1:02:28
do. And so you're circumspect toward if you or not,
1:02:31
or people using advertisers, like we heard from Richard
1:02:35
Edelman, to, you know, manipulate what the platform is
1:02:39
doing.
1:02:40
Yeah. So what you do, but that's what you do. That is exactly was
1:02:44
anything weird about what you do. But if you do, but I don't
1:02:48
think me I think the complaint that we generally have about the
1:02:51
mainstream media and advertising and, and the manipulation of the
1:02:55
public. I think that's a little bit I think that's what you do,
1:03:00
but you could still at least try to do your job and try to maybe,
1:03:04
you know, not be a complete stooge, like it was for Pfizer,
1:03:08
or the drug, the big pharma everybody going along with
1:03:11
whatever they want you to do, because their advertising is so
1:03:15
onerous. Now, I
1:03:15
will say, I will say that we talked about vaccines about
1:03:19
deaths about all and we didn't, that was not a problem. And Joe
1:03:23
does have a lot of power. He has a lot of power, he can pretty
1:03:27
much do anything he wants. By
1:03:31
the way, he's still I think, I believe he's probably still
1:03:35
irked about the being called out for using horse Metis talked
1:03:39
about it we there was in that context. We talked about it.
1:03:42
It's in the head to Sanjay Gupta on and Joe says Why did everyone
1:03:45
lie about that? And Sanjay Gupta is brainless.
1:03:49
His brain went bald. No, it didn't do that. It was just the
1:03:54
opposite. He was jacked up so he could defend himself off i don't
1:03:58
know i don't believe it. Let me go back and check with the
1:04:00
office.
1:04:02
Check with HQ. But advertising is under attack in a different
1:04:06
way. With big tech and and I'm I have some thoughts about this.
1:04:11
We actually share the story with each other in between shows
1:04:15
Justice Department has filed a second antitrust lawsuit against
1:04:19
Google, the DOJ is seeking to break up what it calls Google's
1:04:22
monopoly over digital advertising technology. In 2020,
1:04:27
the DOJ filed another antitrust suit accusing Google of abusing
1:04:31
its dominance over online searches. That case is expected
1:04:35
to go to trial in September, Google said today the DOJ is
1:04:39
doubling down on a flawed argument that would slow
1:04:42
innovation, raise fees and hurt small businesses and publishers.
1:04:47
What do we think this is about? Is it really about smile
1:04:51
advertisers really
1:04:57
discussed this a bit on DH unplugged
1:05:00
Where were you also plug no agenda show? Uh, no agenda
1:05:03
show.com instead of.net, by the way,
1:05:07
just it links,
1:05:10
links, links,
1:05:12
links. I did that. I'm terrible at times actually make that
1:05:18
mistake, but I know it links I don't worry, no worries, no
1:05:20
worries. Now the this bet baffles me too, because I am
1:05:24
watching this as like, you know, this is like, what did Google do
1:05:28
or not do? Did they drop their? Their, their lobbying budget a
1:05:34
little bit because that have a huge lobbying buzzard budget,
1:05:37
are they not giving enough free rides under one of 3767 jets
1:05:42
that they own? Maybe there's a couple of you know, they need to
1:05:46
give kick in that give that contribute that jet to some free
1:05:50
rides for Nancy? Perhaps.
1:05:53
I mean, this has to be one of those are closely related
1:05:57
options.
1:05:59
Because I don't see that there's anything else going on here?
1:06:02
That is not been already been? We've gone over a million times.
1:06:07
And of course, the EU has been nailing or maybe we just need
1:06:10
some extra money from them. The EU because the EU has been
1:06:13
soaking Google Google every time they get a chance. And, you
1:06:17
know, maybe we could use a few of those bucks over here in our
1:06:19
treasury. Why is the EU get all that money? I don't know.
1:06:26
Well, as I was thinking about it, you know, back to back to
1:06:31
the basic thesis of tic toc winning. I have a feeling that
1:06:37
is related to that. Okay, we're going to do platform Tiktok for
1:06:41
you. We're going to tell everyone that it and even Joe
1:06:44
was so convinced, well wait a minute, they track everything.
1:06:47
They track keystrokes and other computers. And I said, Dude, you
1:06:52
really think that no one else does that? Really? Yeah. Really?
1:06:56
Of course, they all do that. Of course. They're all tracking it.
1:07:00
Maybe it's a Okay, time for you to give something back here. Or
1:07:04
you know, we're trying to help you Google because we all know
1:07:07
that. Tick tock is where people search for stuff. Now. If you
1:07:10
want a great restaurant, search on tick tock, look at the short
1:07:13
videos of people showing you the food Google loses in search with
1:07:18
the kids. Maybe it's you know, you know, maybe you're just not
1:07:26
like you say not we need more money, maybe more lobbying. It
1:07:31
is after all, Marco Rubio and Holly and all of these all these
1:07:36
people who are doing this for Google and for meta. And maybe
1:07:42
meta will get some hassle as well. Possible.
1:07:47
I think medicine Yeah, it could be I have three clips that kind
1:07:50
of lead to something that's conclusive that might have
1:07:53
something to do with this. Okay. And these are the clips about it
1:07:58
because they're making a fuss about this. A Bolsonaro is in
1:08:01
Florida. Oh, really? He's living with a one of those MMA
1:08:09
fighters, UFC fighters.
1:08:12
Now, why not?
1:08:14
Well, he's apparently one of the superstars. And he's a
1:08:17
Brazilian, and he has his mansion. And he says, you know,
1:08:21
you want to stay someplace stay here. And so it's like, you
1:08:24
know, the way it works, I guess. Yeah. And so he's in and it's in
1:08:30
Orlando, even though I didn't want to leave this clip in
1:08:33
because it's from NPR. They tried to imply that he's right
1:08:36
next door to Trump was nowhere near Orlando. But okay. All
1:08:41
right. But let's listen to these clips because this is kind of
1:08:45
interesting. But the third clip is the Whoa clip, which is like
1:08:49
then they just ignore they just overlook and I think this might
1:08:52
have something to do with it. Because suddenly you just said
1:08:55
let's play Bolsonaro in Florida, NPR,
1:08:57
January 8 rocked Brazil. That is the day when 1000s of supporters
1:09:02
of Scheier Bolsonaro stormed Congress and the Supreme Court
1:09:06
and the presidential office. Bolsonaro had tried and failed
1:09:10
in his bid for re election as President his supporters claimed
1:09:13
with no evidence that rigged Brazilian officials are now
1:09:18
investigating events that triggered the riots, but there's
1:09:21
one key player missing Bolsonaro himself. The now ex president is
1:09:27
now living in Florida, where he makes regular appearances poses
1:09:30
for photos with supporters and keeps a conspicuous distance
1:09:34
from Brazil's a peaceful and pure NATIONAL SECURITY
1:09:37
CORRESPONDENT Sergio Olmos visited the Florida neighborhood
1:09:41
where Bolsonaro is staying. Hey there, Sergio. Hey, hey, so tell
1:09:45
me more. We're
1:09:45
exactly Hey, this is a new way of interface. So hey there Hey
1:09:48
there, John. Hey, so hey, tell me just a new NP we
1:09:51
I've been playing a lot of NPR close but this has been going on
1:09:54
for years and I just beyond me. Hey, hey, hey, now.
1:09:57
Hey now, NPR NATIONAL SECURITY CORRESPONDENT series. You're
1:10:00
almost visited the Florida neighborhood where Bolsonaro is
1:10:03
staying. Hey there, Sergio. Hey, Mary Louise. Hey. So tell me
1:10:06
more. Where exactly is he in Florida.
1:10:08
So he's staying at a vacation home owned by a Brazilian MMA
1:10:11
fighter in a suburb outside of Orlando, near Walt Disney World.
1:10:15
There's a few dozen people that go see him every day there was
1:10:18
40 to 50 people when I was there last week. Seeing him there's a
1:10:23
mix of emotions among the crowd. It's like seeing a celebrity or
1:10:25
going to church people park their cars on the on a on a dirt
1:10:29
road. Outside the skate community. They a lot of them
1:10:32
are rental cars, they walk past the security gate to get in and
1:10:35
wait patiently on the sidewalk outside of his house. And
1:10:38
they're they're dressed up again, like they're going to
1:10:39
church, very nice families, kids. Some people bring
1:10:42
Brazilian flags with them. It's a really wholesome atmosphere.
1:10:46
There's this informal schedule where Bolsonaro come out in the
1:10:48
morning and again in the afternoon, and people kind of
1:10:51
wait around to see exactly what time will come out. And we saw
1:10:54
him come out and people were just aghast to see the ex
1:10:57
president.
1:10:58
It's kind of like Punxsutawney Phil.
1:11:03
Yeah. So he, so this is kind of a funny scene. It sounds like a
1:11:08
game where they continue.
1:11:09
Sorry. Every day, he comes out twice a day and greets
1:11:12
supporters. Yeah. And
1:11:14
it's informal. It's not guaranteed. So people are kind
1:11:16
of waiting to talk to each other. Like, has it come out
1:11:18
today? What time and you
1:11:19
can't buy tickets for it, unfortunately, skip the line,
1:11:22
skip the line,
1:11:23
stuff like that. All right. So you were there one afternoon,
1:11:26
tell me tell me what that moment was like what you saw?
1:11:29
Yeah, most of the people that are resilient expats, some are
1:11:32
visiting the US, and they're from Brazil, and they stop off
1:11:35
to see him. It's near Walt Disney World again. So it's kind
1:11:38
of like a tourist attraction in some ways. And then some of the
1:11:40
people who who I saw there, were just staying in the area to
1:11:44
vacation resort kind of area. And we saw a group of people
1:11:48
walking by and asked, Who is this man that everyone's taking
1:11:50
pictures with? And they were stunned to learn the foreign
1:11:53
president, Brazil, and they got in the queue and took a photo
1:11:55
with them as well.
1:11:57
In the queue. In the queue? Yeah, we have to use those two
1:12:00
terms. British words. Yeah. In the queue, everybody
1:12:03
in the queue. Okay. So they go on a Yak and Yak and we you know
1:12:07
about the whole thing. And then they bring up this is the last
1:12:09
clips a minute clip, and they just kind of ignore what the
1:12:12
importance of what they're going to what I'm playing here, the
1:12:15
importance of this clip relates back to what you just said, and
1:12:19
or what one of the clips you were referring to, but listen to
1:12:22
this and then ponder it in ways that they're not pondering it.
1:12:27
People were happy to talk and they aren't deterred by the
1:12:30
riots of January 8, eighth, there's some of these people
1:12:33
that are in Orlando, visiting him, obviously, are some of his
1:12:35
most fervent supporters. They don't see any kind of thing
1:12:40
wrong with January 8. And one thing that really struck me was
1:12:42
talking to people there was their media died the role of
1:12:45
social media. So many supporters are telling me that at this
1:12:48
point, they almost exclusively get their news from social media
1:12:51
where of course, theories and fake news. look just like real
1:12:55
news. Here's what one supporter Lee Sutton told me. She was
1:12:58
visiting Florida from Brazil. Yeah, because
1:13:00
television was a massive TV ralliers newspaper magazine.
1:13:06
Nobody says says not seeing social media. So social media
1:13:10
only you have to follow all the bills on the US believe
1:13:16
Instagram, Twitter. Be all of them.
1:13:21
And we saw this with January 8, like January 6 here in the
1:13:24
United States, the role of social media played in ramping
1:13:26
up supporters and spreading disinformation.
1:13:28
Ah, yes. Okay. Hmm. Google, get in line. Twitter Get in line.
1:13:40
Actually, I have a clip about Twitter getting in line. This is
1:13:43
a European Commission vice president for values and
1:13:47
transparency
1:13:49
after Mr. Musk took over Twitter with his freedom of speech
1:13:53
absolutism. We are the protectors of freedom of speech
1:13:59
as well. But at the same time,
1:14:02
that's the funniest thing I've heard. We are the protectors of
1:14:05
freedom of speech as well shut up
1:14:07
after Mr. Musk over Twitter with his famous absolutism.
1:14:12
We got to keep that in that torture, that torture.
1:14:17
We are the protectors of freedom of speech as well. But at the
1:14:21
same time, we cannot accept, for instance, the illegal content
1:14:25
online. Our message was clear. We have the rules, which has
1:14:31
superior to have to be complied with. And otherwise there will
1:14:34
be sanctions. I think that the confidence has been weakened.
1:14:40
And I had quite a high level of confidence when it comes to
1:14:44
Twitter. I have to say that we worked with knowledgeable
1:14:46
people, with the lawyers with sociologists who understood that
1:14:51
they have to behave in some decent way not to cause really
1:14:58
big harm to this it I always felt that this this notion of
1:15:03
responsibility was there. So this is what I don't feel from
1:15:09
Elon Musk personally, but but we will see he was invited to the
1:15:12
European Parliament. I'm I wonder whether it will happen.
1:15:16
Yeah, they all want control. It's gonna be a tough one for
1:15:19
Ilan.
1:15:20
They want to listen to a couple of things about the Brazilian
1:15:22
commentary, especially that woman, the Brazilian that was
1:15:25
talking about magazines and newspapers being useless. Yes.
1:15:29
She said a couple of things that were interesting here. And
1:15:32
before I mentioned, I should mention that the Brazilians, as
1:15:36
part of the Portuguese culture, but probably an extreme example,
1:15:39
are the most sociable people in the world.
1:15:42
Yeah, they're, they're not on they're not really on social
1:15:46
media all the time. Are they? Yeah. Oh, they
1:15:48
are. Because you remember that that project that was years ago?
1:15:53
Or cut? Which was
1:15:55
Oh, you're right. It was the there was the Brazilian
1:15:58
transsexuals that took over and Google quit.
1:16:01
Yeah, that's the way it was like to be portrayed. But it wasn't
1:16:04
the Brazilian trick. It was everybody. Okay, the Brazilians
1:16:08
are, they're sociable people as a like, Well, I used to go there
1:16:13
a lot, because I was writing for one of the magazines down there.
1:16:15
And I would go down there and strangers would set up a party
1:16:19
around me. Because they set up a party run anyone is, hey, let
1:16:24
him know. You're
1:16:25
the big bosses. Come on, let's
1:16:27
set up a party. But if you want to go to Brazil, let me know,
1:16:30
I'll tell one person. Don't put a party around you. Because they
1:16:34
like to party. That's what they do. They party, they socialize,
1:16:37
they talked a chat they going out they have restaurants and
1:16:41
that I mean, it's just it's lively. Let's put it that way.
1:16:45
And Karneval if you see movies of it, or anything is
1:16:49
unbelievable. So so they're sociable. So social media will
1:16:53
always play a role. But But I think it's it's a tip of the of
1:16:58
the spear. Because when she says that it did look tidbit that she
1:17:02
had in there, she said, we only get our news from social media.
1:17:06
And this she mentioned from people we trust.
1:17:09
Google net casts you trust from people you love.
1:17:13
Yeah. So. So there was there's a trust factor. So in other words,
1:17:17
if you're going to be providing news like we do, you have to be
1:17:21
trusted. And we are we have a lot of people that write us and
1:17:24
say, you know, I gave up on the newspapers that their mainstream
1:17:27
media stinks. That's exactly what this woman said. Yeah, yes.
1:17:33
That's what we hear too, because we and we go out of our way to
1:17:37
be accurate. Mostly by deconstructing let people do
1:17:41
their own thing in every way. And we also have people boots on
1:17:44
the ground and the rest. But this is a big deal. And and in
1:17:49
fact that they would pay little attention to it at NPR, knowing
1:17:52
that there I target, along with the M 5am. Of this change this
1:17:58
cultural change, which is doesn't surprise me that it
1:18:01
would start in Brazil. But I think this is universal. I think
1:18:05
this is a big deal. And I think this is part of the TIC tock
1:18:07
problem. And I think this is maybe what's got something to do
1:18:10
with this Google event that's taking place where they're going
1:18:13
after Google for some reasons. This sum up
1:18:16
or cut what I'm reading from the book of knowledge orkut was a
1:18:19
social networking service owned and operated by Google. I think
1:18:22
they purchased it, didn't they?
1:18:23
They bought No I think they I think this was a home group
1:18:25
grown I could be wrong.
1:18:28
Owned and operated by Google. The service was designed to help
1:18:30
users meet new and old friends and maintain existing
1:18:33
relationships. The website was named after its creator, Google
1:18:36
employee orchid. buco Coco Cockington. Cheese. Well, it's
1:18:40
be you with an ohm loud why you with an OOM? Loud, que Ko was an
1:18:44
OOM loud k t e n. B O'Connor. Orca was one of the most visited
1:18:49
website Turkish in India and Brazil. In 2008, Google
1:18:53
announced that orchid will be fully managed and operated in
1:18:56
Brazil by Google Brazil in the city of Baylor or his or his
1:18:59
auntie, and was decided due to the large Brazilian user base
1:19:03
and bass and growth of legal issues. June 30 2014, Google
1:19:09
announced it would soon be closing or cut on September 30.
1:19:12
No new accounts could be created. Blah, blah, blah, blah,
1:19:16
blah. And they said
1:19:18
another example of Google dropping the ball on something
1:19:21
they actually did, right.
1:19:22
The legal issues were stemmed from Bombay's High Court serving
1:19:27
a notice on Google for allowing a hate campaign against India.
1:19:31
Hmm huh. So you're right. I'm sorry. That was the meme was
1:19:35
that they didn't like to the Brazilian transsexuals. That was
1:19:39
my bed on that. And I'll never use that term again.
1:19:43
The term I'm hoping you're referring to as my bad
1:19:45
that's what I said my bed. Brazilian federal judge Jose
1:19:49
Marcos Linder ordered Google to release by September 28 orkut
1:19:53
users information of a list of about 24 Brazilian nationals
1:19:56
believed to be using orca to sell drugs and involved in
1:19:59
China. I'll pornography. The shutdown here we go Google
1:20:03
announced or Kobe shutting down completely, users could export
1:20:07
their photo albums. And Okay Google engineering director,
1:20:13
Paolo goldgar. GoGear said in a blog post over the past decade
1:20:18
Facebook, YouTube blogger and Google Plus have taken off,
1:20:24
took off and went, by the way. So what is the difference
1:20:30
between Google Plus or what they tried to do? It's Google Plus.
1:20:33
And by the way, I'll tell you, no CEO should know this. If you
1:20:37
set up something that says you set up a shop and one way and
1:20:40
it's pretty much doing so and then you kill it, and then set
1:20:43
up a similar operation, people aren't going to go to it, they
1:20:46
just see and say, Hey, you just gonna kill it. What kind of
1:20:49
thinking is this Google Plus was how different was it from
1:20:52
orchid?
1:20:53
Well, the issue is the issue is they couldn't get Western people
1:20:59
to use it that if that happens, you know, just sometimes stuff
1:21:03
just happens at community forums and, and no one else will come
1:21:07
in. Oh, that's the Brazilian transsexuals. I don't know what
1:21:11
the what the problem was. But that just didn't work. And of
1:21:15
course, they've never been able to have any success with that.
1:21:19
There was something else kind of technology related in, in
1:21:24
Brazil. Of course, the ex criminal Lula, one quote, air
1:21:30
quotes the election. Check this out
1:21:32
a warm welcome in Buenos Aires, the hugs a sign of renewed
1:21:36
friendship between South America's leading powers with
1:21:40
the Jair Bolsonaro years over Luis Inacio Lula de Silva is
1:21:45
forging an alliance with cooperation agreements in
1:21:48
various sectors, including energy, education and health.
1:21:52
The two Presidents left his allies want to create a common
1:21:56
currency for trade.
1:21:59
We don't know how a common currency between Argentina and
1:22:02
Brazil could work. But what we do know is how economies work
1:22:05
when they depend on foreign currencies to be able to trace.
1:22:09
We know how harmful that is.
1:22:12
What do you think the chances are, that will be a central bank
1:22:15
digital peso?
1:22:17
I thought it'd be the marrow. How about the south of marrow?
1:22:22
Oh, man, the marrow. Do you know when that America was floated?
1:22:29
That was really around 2009. A lot of times it was way before
1:22:33
No. But people started talking about it. When the when the h
1:22:36
one n one hit. There was there's a really interesting, I put it
1:22:40
in the show notes as a website that that has all these clips
1:22:46
like mini clips, mini mini cuts, mini super cuts that are so
1:22:52
analogous to COVID only in 2009. Coincidentally, when we also had
1:22:58
a big financial problem is just play one of these short ones.
1:23:02
Each one and one virus is made 1000s of people across the
1:23:05
country sick, many have died, and some worry that it could
1:23:08
grow into a full blown pandemic. Well, one state the Commonwealth
1:23:12
of Massachusetts is preparing for that with a very
1:23:15
controversial bill, Massachusetts proposing
1:23:18
legislation that would allow police to forcefully quarantine
1:23:23
residents and even impose martial law without a warrant.
1:23:27
back now with two quick updates on a story that began this
1:23:30
broadcast last night the predicted quick and rapid spread
1:23:35
of swine flu in this country and around the world. The US
1:23:38
military considering a plan that could establish regional
1:23:42
military teams to assist civilian authorities in the
1:23:46
event of a major outbreak of the virus this fall. What do you
1:23:49
think of the vaccination?
1:23:52
Yeah, that's the I have more concern about the vaccine than I
1:23:55
do about the swine flu. It's been rushed to market there are
1:23:59
high levels of adjuncts, which basically make it more potent
1:24:03
make so they can it's kind of a unrefined method that they use.
1:24:07
They have these high levels of these adjuncts including by
1:24:10
Marisol
1:24:11
adjuvants. I know you said it wrong. Kind of eerily similar.
1:24:16
Oh, yeah, then playbook. And we and we identified that as a
1:24:20
playbook, which is one of the reasons why we were extremely
1:24:22
skeptical, extremely skeptical,
1:24:26
why we need this. This is the advantage, even though it's hard
1:24:31
to imagine, but it's
1:24:33
hard to imagine an advantage for the vow of poverty. We took
1:24:37
just two advantages, as you mentioned that we have the vow
1:24:40
of poverty. In other words, we don't take advertising. Yeah,
1:24:43
and the other thing is time in service. So doing 15 years and
1:24:48
seeing a repetition of this exact same process, two or three
1:24:55
times is an advantage because it can push you point back as
1:24:59
nobody does. instead.
1:25:01
So let me see where we are. We were gonna do one donation block
1:25:05
again and won't be too long. That's kind of the good news for
1:25:08
everybody. But there are things now so we got the shutdown, we
1:25:12
got the mandates, you know, although not governmentally
1:25:15
mandated mandated for companies and for a of course, for
1:25:18
government positions, except for the FDA and CDC, for some
1:25:22
reason, very odd. And now we have we got the inflation which
1:25:28
did not happen after 2009 Because we just said, oh, you
1:25:31
know what, we'll just kind of lower interest rates, free
1:25:34
money, everybody, we will grow like crazy, which we did. Now
1:25:38
that free money train is over. And so now we have crime and we
1:25:41
have people getting shot up and killed in California of all
1:25:45
places where the gun laws are extremely tough. And then you
1:25:51
have just little little nuggets like this
1:25:52
getting money out of the ATM is getting less convenient for some
1:25:55
bank customers. Chase Bank is now locking some of its ATM
1:25:59
vestibules in New York City in the early evening. Now they were
1:26:02
previously open 24/7 Chase blames rising crime and vagrancy
1:26:06
other smaller banks have made the same change.
1:26:09
So the ATM is going away there goes your cash. I mean, they're
1:26:12
just gonna have to shut that down. I mean, we shutting down
1:26:14
MC stabby. We're shutting down Starbucks because of the crime
1:26:19
and druggies in California just hanging out in front of it. But
1:26:22
there's a little more to it. Now we have the technological edge,
1:26:26
because we barely had the iPhones the last time this
1:26:28
happened, maybe for a year or two. And now you've got this
1:26:33
story
1:26:33
this morning. The owner of two of the most famous venues in New
1:26:36
York is under scrutiny for using facial recognition technology to
1:26:40
deny entry to certain people. New York Attorney General
1:26:43
Letitia James has sent a letter to MSG entertainment owner of
1:26:46
Madison Square Garden and Radio City Music Hall requesting
1:26:49
information about its use of the technology your ticket is not
1:26:53
valid. Multiple lawyers who are already involved in litigation
1:26:56
against MSG say the company used facial recognition to bar them
1:27:00
from events. Larry Hutcher says his Knicks season tickets were
1:27:03
revoked last year after MSG removed his colleague from a
1:27:06
game at Madison Square Garden at the time archers law firm
1:27:09
represented ticket resellers who were suing MSG,
1:27:12
there is no rational, legal, moral or any explanation that
1:27:20
you could give that would justify the action that Madison
1:27:23
Square Garden has taken.
1:27:25
Kelly Conlon says she tried to attend a Rockettes show around
1:27:28
the holidays. But she says the venue scanned her face and
1:27:30
stopped her from entering her firm happened to be working a
1:27:33
case against one of msgs restaurants James writing MSG
1:27:37
entertainment cannot fight their legal battles in their own
1:27:40
arenas. A representative for MSG said the policy does not
1:27:43
unlawfully prohibit anyone from entering our venues. We are
1:27:46
merely excluding a small percentage of lawyers only
1:27:49
during active litigation. But the practice is raising ethical
1:27:52
and legal questions with potential ripple effects far
1:27:55
beyond New York,
1:27:56
it is very dystopian, it is very 1984 ish. How far is this
1:28:02
technology going to go? That people are going to be able to
1:28:05
use this type of technology to to take action that is clearly
1:28:12
not what it was originally intended. It's
1:28:15
frightening. Hey, that's groovy in it.
1:28:19
I have actually mixed feelings about Okay. And by the way, I
1:28:23
had that clip of that this began with that woman, which was the
1:28:27
last one they mentioned in that group and I had a clip on it.
1:28:30
It's not like that woman months ago. It was just a woman who was
1:28:35
involved in the law case, she worked at a law firm that was
1:28:38
suing MSG can nothing to do with the suit or or even at branch to
1:28:43
the firm was one of these big giant law firms, but they kept
1:28:45
her face and what she saw she wanted to come into some
1:28:48
something with her. I think it was a ballet or something like
1:28:50
Nutcracker with her daughter wouldn't that's
1:28:52
exactly what they said the Radio City Music Hall.
1:28:56
And so that was the first episode of this was been going
1:29:00
on. So as a couple of things, though, for example, if you're
1:29:04
going if you're in a venue and you you're a nuisance, and they
1:29:10
throw you out for life, which has been done, especially in New
1:29:13
York venues, just like your unruly drunk at a Yankees game,
1:29:18
which is pretty much redundant. Right? But they take draw you
1:29:24
out for life. I don't see that it's a problem that they
1:29:27
monitor, you're coming into their private venue. Personally,
1:29:30
I
1:29:31
totally agree. But what you heard is a guy was not let in
1:29:34
because his buddy was rude, unruly in his box or whatever.
1:29:39
He had a section or a box or whatever, or
1:29:42
the woman in the law firm. I agree that those two are I think
1:29:45
that's actionable. I think they can be sued.
1:29:48
Well, that that woman that lawsuit has been around Well, I
1:29:51
mean, nothing's been determined yet. And I just disagree. I
1:29:54
don't I think that the technology is taken over there
1:29:58
now pressuring companies Look, we're gonna get rid of Tik Tok.
1:30:02
So Google you better pony up, we're gonna screw with you. Meta
1:30:06
Gosh knows where we're Facebook and an Instagram and all that
1:30:11
will go. Elon Musk, you know, the old there is no way out for
1:30:16
him with advertising just no way. It's not going to work
1:30:19
anymore. So his plan of x.com Better Work. And I'll just stick
1:30:24
on the technology and then I'll get off of it because something
1:30:27
very interesting happened this week. I don't know if they
1:30:30
probably happened on Wednesday. Did you see what happened with
1:30:33
the with the New York Stock Exchange? Note? Check it out.
1:30:39
Bob, what do we know?
1:30:40
Yeah, hi, I am just walking around on the floor talking to
1:30:44
people. And as David has noted, there's a lot of strange prices.
1:30:48
I don't have an answer. I talked to Michael algorand, who runs
1:30:52
for trading, he's going upstairs into a meeting. It seems like
1:30:56
there was a systemic sort of issue with the prices. Now we
1:31:00
don't know for sure. But walking around just talking to the
1:31:04
designated market makers and looking at prices. Some
1:31:06
companies, some stocks appear to have opened up, limit up limit
1:31:10
down. Some had incorrect prices. And we're just trying to still
1:31:14
sort through exactly what's going on. I don't quite know,
1:31:18
you know, this has been fairly rare for occurrence. Like
1:31:20
there's some kind of technical or technological issue. And
1:31:24
that's what it looks like, at the NYSC has hadn't had has not
1:31:27
happened in a very, very long time. So I think that this was
1:31:32
primarily not related to anybody with pricing on the floor or
1:31:37
anybody else doing something. It was a technological issue. And
1:31:40
we're still sorting it out. I'm gonna go over here and talk
1:31:42
again to the designated market makers team, the floor
1:31:44
officials, Carl, I'll see what I can get you in the next couple
1:31:47
of
1:31:47
minutes. So that's just as it happens, CNBC clearly knows
1:31:50
nothing. Don't know what's happened. You can see it was
1:31:52
very confused hasn't happened a long time. What's going on?
1:31:55
Luckily, we have a follow up from Yahoo. Quote,
1:31:59
we haven't seen this in years traders and market watchers
1:32:03
reacted in open jobs shock at this morning's market moves, the
1:32:07
New York Stock Exchange apparently suffering a quote,
1:32:10
glitch. Now, that's
1:32:13
pretty incredible took me by surprise, Jared flickery has
1:32:16
been all over it for us today, Jared, what happened and what
1:32:20
has
1:32:21
gone forward? Going forward, I don't think we have a lot to
1:32:24
worry about probably a one off here. But we should review this
1:32:27
affected 252 names, this is only about a third to a quarter of
1:32:31
them. And at the opening auction. And that's basically
1:32:34
the opening bell here you have trades that are supposed to be
1:32:37
matched. And that did not occur. And so you had all this
1:32:41
liquidity, if you can think of the bids up here and the offers
1:32:43
down here, all that vanish. So that by the time the exchanges
1:32:47
got some information from the New York Stock Exchange, it was
1:32:49
too late, a bunch of trades had executed way above and way below
1:32:53
the prices. So in a bunch of these big names like Walmart,
1:32:56
Taiwan, semi, Exxon Mobil, a lot of those trades are going to be
1:33:00
canceled. And we just found that out a few minutes ago, when we
1:33:02
got this notice from the New York Stock Exchange, not going
1:33:05
to go into all the details. But basically, any stock or any
1:33:09
security that was subjected to these trades early on today, if
1:33:12
they were out of those volatility bands probably going
1:33:15
to be decayed or just overturned. This is a this is a
1:33:19
fact of life. It happens they weren't supposed to happen in
1:33:21
the first place. perfectly legal, legal, erroneous trade
1:33:24
happens. And now they're going to be canceled. But if you think
1:33:27
you were affected, make sure you check your account statements,
1:33:30
you're going to have only a few days to probably review. And if
1:33:33
there are any problems correct the situation
1:33:35
and I look forward to hopefully a deconstruction on the next DHT
1:33:39
on plug unplugged. From what I understand. You could not short
1:33:44
the market at the open when this happened. That's suspicious to
1:33:48
me. It's like we know there's a plunge protection team. But man,
1:33:53
could they actually just stop the shorting on the big stocks
1:33:56
that might have had some bad news?
1:33:59
Well, there was no moment to short but I mean, it wasn't like
1:34:04
everyone was getting ready to short the market. I think this
1:34:07
is the Russians.
1:34:10
You I can hear your phone off the hook. Right? I can hear your
1:34:14
phone going to do anything.
1:34:17
So I think it's the Russians,
1:34:19
the Russians. No, no, it's not the Russians. It is literally
1:34:23
Putin. He's the one doing this. And with that, I'd like to thank
1:34:27
you for your courage say the morning to you the man who put
1:34:29
the sea in the climate terian and please say hello to my
1:34:32
friend on the latest. Mr. John C.
1:34:38
Well, in the morning you have Mr. Adam curry also in the
1:34:41
morning your ships and sea boots in the ground, being in the
1:34:43
ourselves in the water. The dames tonight out there and in
1:34:46
the morning to our trolls who hang out in the troll room.
1:34:49
They've been very active today and very attentive. We
1:34:51
appreciate that hanging out with us on a Thursday you can go to
1:34:54
troll room.io You actually you can just listen to no agenda
1:34:58
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preference. It's just scheduled a lot of live shows, you'll hear
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that live at troll room.io. And you can also jump right into the
1:35:12
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1:35:15
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1:35:21
podcast, attic addict, and soon fountain now all of the apps are
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doing it. Now it's kind of a new category, where you your podcast
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downloaded or had been pre recorded. You can also now get a
1:35:37
batch signal that alerts you that your favorite podcast is
1:35:40
going live and you tap on it open up go in, and there is the
1:35:43
troll room and live stream for you to enjoy new podcast
1:35:46
apps.com What are you laughing at?
1:35:51
You'll see. Oh,
1:35:54
really? That sounds very ominous. Let's see how many
1:35:58
trolls we have in this central. Low low low 1826. Where is
1:36:07
everybody? Yeah, bad. It's not bad. Where's everybody? Oh, it's
1:36:11
fine.
1:36:12
Yeah, it's fine.
1:36:13
What should be on a scale of zero to 100? How fine is it?
1:36:17
It's about a 90 Oh, okay,
1:36:19
I feel better. Of course, you can also hang out or to follow
1:36:24
us in the aforementioned no agenda social.com where you will
1:36:28
not get censored unless you're a dick. And you're just not yet
1:36:33
just participate in the community if you're on no agenda
1:36:36
social.com Or just follow Adam and no genesis.com Jhansi Dvorak
1:36:40
had no agenda social.com You can follow us from any Mastodon
1:36:43
account that doesn't block us which is a couple of 100. So
1:36:46
find one that works for you and, and have a good time. Enjoy
1:36:50
everybody. The artists are on that on that system as well. And
1:36:53
we love our artists. Part of the value for value model is the
1:36:57
incredible art that we get to choose from for every single
1:37:01
episode that we're known for it. People love them they they vote
1:37:08
on them, you know, even though we've chosen it already, it's
1:37:12
just it's beautiful. It's beautiful capitalist agenda
1:37:15
brought us the album cover art for episode 1523. The title of
1:37:19
that was take tank talk, which I hope we'll be doing later. Some
1:37:23
more tank talk a lot of histo is missed
1:37:25
it. It's on here. It's mixed. Abby was was his what he called
1:37:30
it
1:37:31
was tank jockey but it was the MC stabby
1:37:35
look at the top right. Top part right.
1:37:38
Oh, hold on a second. I haven't opened that up yet. Okay, so the
1:37:42
artists what they do is they listen to the show live, troll
1:37:46
room.io And they are creating art on the fly. So Oh, what a
1:37:53
beautiful cake. You got I don't I did that corrected record. So
1:37:59
there's also just do art just to make us laugh, which is also
1:38:02
adorable. We love that. And we really appreciate capitalist
1:38:06
agenda for bringing us the artwork for the episode 1523
1:38:11
It's highly appreciated. It is. It is truly beautiful, beautiful
1:38:15
to have all these choices. You can go look at it yourself. No
1:38:18
agenda agenda generator.com You can refresh in real time, or
1:38:22
anytime you want. There's almost 29,000 pieces there for a little
1:38:26
under 1500 A little over 1500 episodes. It's true. It's
1:38:31
phenomenal value for value is where it's at. And before we
1:38:34
thank our executive and Associate Executive producers, I
1:38:36
would like to mention a couple of news stories. Spotify has
1:38:41
laid off 600 people, Spotify and podcasts ambitions seem to not
1:38:46
be paying off Dawn Ostroff who was the employee who started all
1:38:54
the big acquisitions of talent I believe, including Joe, she has
1:38:58
departed. She has she was putting down $7.5 million a
1:39:02
year. Which is nice job if you can get it, but also huge
1:39:08
rumblings about Patreon mismanagement Patria Patreon.
1:39:14
Yeah, Patreon is in trouble. They've gotten a predictable.
1:39:17
Yeah, and I can't read this whole article. without
1:39:20
subscribing to the information.com at Patreon
1:39:24
mismanagement thoughts, a pandemic era star, there's what
1:39:29
is it? There's financial mismanagement, there's no zero
1:39:35
growth. They raised hundreds of millions of dollars to wind up
1:39:40
at a $4 billion valuation and it seems to be falling apart. So
1:39:47
consider what you're doing people consider you know, where
1:39:51
you stake your income on if you're if you are actually in
1:39:56
the business of podcasting if you're a creator of any sort It
1:40:00
was kind of sad to see that happen. But I can't say it
1:40:02
wasn't predicted.
1:40:05
Well, they might survive it. I mean, the model is just a good
1:40:08
idea.
1:40:10
There was a great idea, but they charge too much there. And they
1:40:13
and they D platform people all the time. Yeah,
1:40:15
that was the problem. They should have stayed in the
1:40:17
background. Yeah. Maybe even done a couple of companies that
1:40:21
look like them, but just had different names. There's a
1:40:24
different long tail approach. You could have gone with that.
1:40:26
But you remember, remember that it was MasterCard, who does the
1:40:30
bulk of their processing who was saying now you got to kick that
1:40:33
guy off? I mean, this financial deplatforming is real. That's
1:40:37
really happening. It's happening through these these horrible
1:40:40
systems. So we'll take it we'll take your support any way we can
1:40:44
get at time town treasurer. Treasurer is of course very
1:40:47
important. People send us cash. They send us through a variety
1:40:50
of ways.
1:40:51
They also can send a check in the mail to box 339 l Sarita
1:40:55
California 94530 made out to no agenda. We have a couple of we
1:41:03
never mentioned that in the show. By the way. I did. I think
1:41:06
I'm remiss. Yes. Well,
1:41:07
you can always find it at vo.org/and A, which will be
1:41:13
refreshed pretty soon. q1 first quarter. Our first executive
1:41:18
producer with $333.33 Jay Mac McGilvery. I think we pronounce
1:41:25
it from Nashua, New Hampshire. First time donating been
1:41:29
listening for a few months now definitely getting value Keep up
1:41:32
the great work looking forward to become a knight in the near
1:41:34
future. I feel like he didn't ask for it. But I feel like
1:41:37
deducing him
1:41:39
Yeah, I think he shouldn't be
1:41:43
bandied do still
1:41:44
good about him. Feel good about deducing him here.
1:41:48
Onward with the Sir Donald in Spokane Valley. He's the he's
1:41:54
sir download the fire bottles. Oh, yeah. I think he's a barren
1:41:59
gentleman a donation to save he used to write on Federation
1:42:03
paper when you run out but he's been kicked off the Federation.
1:42:09
Oh, no, man. What else could it be? Because you got this is
1:42:11
Hewlett Packard, which is another Federation was a
1:42:14
competitor. Skeletal
1:42:18
it's kind of cool. I love enhanced system performance and
1:42:22
increase efficiency with the HP 8935 series TDMA test set. This
1:42:27
has got to be a very old piece of
1:42:29
paper. I think this is the way to go with your notepads have
1:42:32
some promotion on their details?
1:42:35
Hewlett Packard expanding possibilities grow gentlemen
1:42:39
he writes a donation to save me from sliding into full on
1:42:43
douchebaggery Yes, we have not heard from him for a while. He
1:42:46
used to donate 12345 or something like that. We're told
1:42:49
that the unvaccinated risks of severe illness and death from
1:42:54
COVID No doubt the new by Vaillant jab reduces the risk to
1:42:59
mild illness and mild death. Shares through Donald the fire
1:43:05
bottles in Spokane Valley. Our third
1:43:08
and final of the 333 dot 33 Executive Producers of all the
1:43:12
executive producers today is Brian from Arlington, Texas.
1:43:14
Sorry, it's so late coming. But this is my first donation. I
1:43:17
promise to be better next time. Thank you and keep up the great
1:43:20
work by the way. I was hit in the mouth by Dr. John and Brian
1:43:23
Texas. He probably needs a D douching. You've been D deuced.
1:43:31
Brother Thank you.
1:43:32
Interesting. Kurt Butler in South Bend Indiana birthday
1:43:36
donation 25th of January 69. Listening since Adams first
1:43:42
appearance on Jaya Joe Rogan donation. Haven't missed an
1:43:45
episode since thanks to the both of you for the twice weekly
1:43:48
education and entertainment. Thank you. Thank you for not
1:43:53
using the word infotainment Yes. Thank
1:43:55
you. And now he has a he's blue. He's blue. Is he going to he's
1:43:59
in here? Is he going to be a knight? I think so.
1:44:02
No, he's just maybe it's just sad.
1:44:04
No, hold on a second on magenta idol. Let me see. Yes, he's
1:44:09
going to Yes, he's going to be a knight. He'll be sir single
1:44:13
sculler which is not in his note. Interestingly enough. It
1:44:17
came in somehow. Timothy Johnston in Dubuque, Iowa, two.
1:44:23
Oh, and this donations to fight polio misinformation? No, he's
1:44:29
no jingles with a G No. No. giggles no karma? No. Gingell?
1:44:33
No. ginkgos would you like to say anything about that? It was
1:44:37
all your fault.
1:44:39
I express myself I think adequately in the last
1:44:41
newsletter. You should be on the mailing list for the newsletter.
1:44:45
And we have essays in there occasionally. And the newsletter
1:44:50
is promoted on Twitter and no agenda social so you should be
1:44:53
able to get ahold of it somehow.
1:44:55
Very good. Because we do like to respond when we're when people
1:44:58
think we're wrong for If we are wrong in this case, apparently
1:45:02
we're we will still right kind of. No, we were right. Well, you
1:45:07
are right. It was is your beat. I'm withdrawing from this.
1:45:10
Good. Tennessee Johnson says next on the list and he's in
1:45:13
Dubuque, Iowa. Oh, he's the one who just I'm sorry. You read
1:45:16
him. Mary Walters when I'm supposed to read. You got a big
1:45:19
mark with the arrow St. John, you read this DoD City, Texas.
1:45:23
And she writes and she even with 200 hours even my son Owen story
1:45:29
called me out on the last show. He hit me in the mouth a couple
1:45:32
of years ago. I've been in mooch ever since till now. Thanks
1:45:37
gents. 200 bucks, and I guess she deserves a D douching. Oh
1:45:43
Ben de duced
1:45:46
Chad Kelly from Comox California also $200 Associate Executive
1:45:51
Producer no note was found. Oh wait no, no, no, there was no
1:45:55
note for this. No, no, we found nothing so that means a double
1:45:58
up karma for you shad Thank you. You've got karma
1:46:07
David Egan comes in from Austin Texas. Your neck of the woods
1:46:10
are you tired of the M 5am. He writes look no further than
1:46:14
tired as hell.com was as good as this. Working on my side hustle
1:46:20
exit plan and would love for the new agenda community to check
1:46:23
out our new energy drink at tired as hell.com 33% off code.
1:46:32
Bag business karma please.
1:46:34
D bag
1:46:37
bag for knowing this kind of cheap promotion. Oh
1:46:40
the code 33% off with the code D bag.
1:46:45
Ca Danny was business guys? D bag business
1:46:48
karma karma business karma. You've got
1:46:53
where's the karma?
1:46:55
Well, I'm making up the karma obviously. It's what it is. And
1:47:00
then our last SOC executive producer Garrett Hampton Broken
1:47:03
Arrow Oklahoma $200. I just want to remind listeners, if they're
1:47:06
thinking of saving their kids from the government
1:47:08
indoctrination centers, they can use the code and a to save $10
1:47:13
on the home grown generation family Expo coming March 6 to
1:47:17
ninth at Homegrown generation.com. Man, these are
1:47:22
ads probably more than we make on an ad.
1:47:28
Yeah, probably for one year for one go round. And these are
1:47:32
Yeah, and these are people that are supporters of the show. So
1:47:35
that's fine.
1:47:35
I know we love it. Of course it's hilarious. Especially like
1:47:39
but you know, you have to have like a code like D bag just kind
1:47:42
of boss you know, go Go code bag and it's okay. This kind of
1:47:48
thing could be a little could be a little bit snappy white
1:47:51
tiny. Thank you for your courage to be another good code. Yes,
1:47:54
tea, white tea, tea, fat FC.
1:47:57
support my clinic combined. I'll get
1:47:59
the meetups ready and our knighting if you can continue
1:48:02
down the list as not that far till we hit the 50s
1:48:06
Okay, here we go. Starting with Anonymous in Ann Arbor,
1:48:09
Michigan. 175 bucks, long overdue. Needs dog karma for the
1:48:16
road. We'll get to that at the end race Amaury to Morion
1:48:21
Madison, New Jersey. 12963 got a show coming. I got a birthday
1:48:26
coming up as as does Andrew Wyatt in San Antonio, Texas.
1:48:30
12345. Rent Rami McKinney in Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia. One
1:48:40
One, Adrian Christiansen and Raglin Australia 110. And as it
1:48:46
is Australia Day Hey, that's right. One donation I should
1:48:50
have put in the newsletter. And by the way, I can make the sound
1:48:53
of a didgeridoo using a harmonica.
1:48:57
I am I'm blown away. Let's let's hear it
1:49:12
nice, that's a low E flat.
1:49:17
For those who want to know
1:49:22
Rami McKinney, I said Norfolk. And then I was already to Adrian
1:49:26
and now we're up to Chimp from the Saturday Night Light
1:49:29
podcast. North Miami Beach $100. It's his first donation. He's a
1:49:36
de douche. D deuced. On schedules for Kevin McLaughlin
1:49:43
Lucas North Carolina 808 boob. Eric Adler also boop from Punta
1:49:49
Gorda, Florida, and Sir Pete pate are in Amsterdam or
1:49:54
Amsterdam, Ian from Netherlands came in with 808 Gary Blatt, who
1:50:00
Wayne Pennsylvania 7777 Mark Dillahunt in Columbus, Ohio 6969
1:50:07
Wayne Macomb capital L small A. In Sunnybank Hills Australia
1:50:13
another one another Australian
1:50:19
oh, we're gonna get this all the time. Okay.
1:50:22
Well, Australian day so every year yes and
1:50:26
australia day i That's a good one. I agree.
1:50:28
Okay. Course it makes me lose where it was. Was I yet to David
1:50:34
wicker or where was I? Where's the I don't even see the
1:50:37
Australian on here anymore
1:50:38
but that was Adrian Christiansen wasn't it? No, McLaughlin. I
1:50:44
don't know where you were a man. I can't I can't even tell you
1:50:48
did sir pate. Gary Blatt. There is oh here you were Wayne that
1:50:54
was Wayne so you go to rain likho gone Sean
1:50:57
Sean DeSantis Fort Pierce, Florida. Mark Rudolph. Hold on
1:51:00
Hold on. Hold
1:51:01
on. Hold on. Sean is a night we break for nights he said from a
1:51:05
night please don't say de Santos.
1:51:08
And he came in with 60 bucks just to get that message in.
1:51:11
Yes, he did. You know I had I Okay. I try not to say to Santos
1:51:16
it's not one of my gag names. Mark Rudolph and I Hamtramck
1:51:22
Michigan. 5555 sir Tommy Hawk in Iowa City, Iowa. 5555 sir Paulie
1:51:28
Bravo. in Greeley, Colorado. 5555 Well, Sir Tooth Fairy 5510
1:51:34
David wicker double nickels on the dime for him from
1:51:37
Jacksonville, Florida. John jolly in Yukon Oklahoma. 5444.
1:51:43
You actually sent a note in while you're looking for us to
1:51:46
check but what are you looking
1:51:47
for the note we needed deducing from Mark. You've been D deuced
1:51:53
and a minus. We'll do the next one for George Susa. From
1:51:55
Turlock, California with 5333
1:51:59
You've been de Deus. Nicolau Lele Lele, we're vernick in
1:52:07
Eindhoven. Yeah, it was 5163 I know Josh Araya in Alpharetta,
1:52:15
Georgia 51 And he's been listening for a long time. You
1:52:19
met Adam in 2015 in Tampa and once Nelson in Council Bluffs,
1:52:23
Iowa $50 In one
1:52:25
day douching I gotta do the D douching. Favorites
1:52:33
now $50 donors after Scott John Lorenson, helots, Texas detect
1:52:40
squad in Columbia, Georgia. Alexa Delgado in Aptos,
1:52:45
California Cade Haskell in San Rafael, California, Scott
1:52:50
McCarty in Lodi, California, Bart, beak Valder and Veghel,
1:52:56
North Brabant David Perdue and Snow Hill, North Carolina.
1:53:03
Shawna Norberg in Seattle, Washington, Josh Springer in
1:53:07
Indianapolis, Indiana. Douglas Ellis, New York City, Michael
1:53:13
Romano, Sebastopol, California, for Scott Brinkley, in
1:53:18
Christiansburg, Virginia, Jack Schoenfeld in yankeetown
1:53:23
Florida, Shane Morrison and Clark, New Jersey Charles Boyd
1:53:28
in San Marcos, Texas, Robert dry cosin in Oshkosh, bogash Wash U
1:53:34
Wisconsin, Judy Schwartz and Bernie Texas, Andrew Butterfield
1:53:39
in Bettendorf Iowa. Edwin Taurus in San Antonio, Bryan Hummel in
1:53:46
Wimberley, Texas never heard of it. That's where
1:53:49
that's not far from here to where Paul Paul Simon and Ebro
1:53:52
co live. Paul Simon may be moved to Wimberley with Edie Brickell.
1:54:00
Stephanie O'Donnell in Okemos, Michigan, Morgan, Mary
1:54:06
Spicewood, Texas, anybody they're famous.
1:54:09
That's where a lot of the old 80s musicians live. Yes.
1:54:13
Really? Yeah. Well, you learn so much on this show like Mister
1:54:16
Mister remember, those guys?
1:54:18
Know Miko polling in San Francisco, California. John
1:54:25
Walter in Wenatchee was Washington Danielle, first in
1:54:30
Kona, Wisconsin. Good ol Alan Bean. He's a Duke. He's up in
1:54:36
Beaverton, Oregon. And that wraps up our list of well
1:54:39
wishers and supporters for show 1524
1:54:42
Yes, and I'm just reading along with the troll room. If you if
1:54:47
you are going to send in a donation note with a town that
1:54:51
you feel might need a pronunciation guide or
1:54:54
clarification please do so. So it's Hamtramck and also perhaps
1:54:59
Adam let John Oh that Comox and Edmonton aren't Canada not in
1:55:02
California. That's just that's the problem we have on the
1:55:05
spreadsheet. It can't be CA It has to be ca n so we can
1:55:09
decipher it. These are on the fly. These are cold reads
1:55:11
people.
1:55:12
Where's the Canada was? It
1:55:15
was executive producer way up top. Doesn't matter. Doesn't
1:55:19
matter. It was uh
1:55:21
oh, cool. mocks Yeah. Cool. No, I usually catch these. I mean, I
1:55:25
see that there. Yeah, yeah, well, we didn't apparently the
1:55:28
problem is, well, that would be you not me, because that was the
1:55:32
blank when we had no note. We couldn't find a note from shad.
1:55:36
Yeah, so, but you know, just like I got every complaint about
1:55:39
your polio shit. You get every time I mispronounced something.
1:55:43
It's on you. Okay, it's I know it's a fair trade for you.
1:55:50
It is I get it better part of that deal.
1:55:52
You sure do. Thank you very much to all of our executive
1:55:54
producers, Associate Executive producers. These are forever
1:55:58
credits. You can use them for ever, you will always be that
1:56:01
producer exec or associate Exec of episode 15 124. There was
1:56:07
also a not to nitpick, but it's actually an F major, not an F
1:56:11
minor just to let you know that we do have musicians who listen
1:56:14
and it was an F major that you're playing.
1:56:19
I'm just saying it's on the E flat harmonica low
1:56:24
thanks to all the producers who came in and of course under $50
1:56:28
is highly appreciated. We do not read those for reasons of
1:56:31
anonymity. Also, you're on one of our sustaining donations we
1:56:35
need more of those quite frankly for the slow months like January
1:56:38
and April is also another another winner for us. So we
1:56:42
appreciate that. And if you'd like to learn more, go here to
1:56:44
vote.org/and a thank you all for supporting us for episode 1524
1:56:52
Our formula is this. We go out. We hit people in the mouth.
1:57:17
We do have some birthdays to celebrate Kirk Butler turned 54
1:57:20
Yesterday Baron Wayne of the Great Southern land turned 63
1:57:24
Today Jim from the Saturday night let's podcast 34 on
1:57:28
January 26 You've been here on a Saturday night's right here on
1:57:31
no agenda stream.com Andrew wire turns 43 today and Ray some more
1:57:36
he turned 60 on January 29 Happy birthday from everybody he had
1:57:40
the best podcast in the universe. Zero title changes but
1:57:46
we do have a night. One night one loan night so here's my loan
1:57:52
Nightblade Can I bring out the big one for him he's on the same
1:57:58
day go. Okay. Clint Butler, thanks for your support of the
1:58:05
no agenda show in the amount of $1,000 which some take years to
1:58:10
do and it is so incredibly appreciated. I'm very proud to
1:58:13
pronounce the KB as Sir single sculler night of the no agenda
1:58:18
roundtable and for you, we've got the requisite hookers and
1:58:21
blow rent boys and Chardonnay, you've got Polish potato vodka
1:58:24
fish pie fellatio we got cow girls and coffin varnish
1:58:27
Rubenesque woman and Rosie geishas and sock a buck come and
1:58:30
Ella bong hits them bourbon, sparkling cider and escorts who
1:58:33
everyone loves the ginger ale and dribbles, breast milk and
1:58:36
pablum beer and blunts organic macaroni and plasticizers. And
1:58:40
of course, the ever effervescent mutton in Mead. And when you've
1:58:44
finished a porking out on that head over to no agenda
1:58:47
nation.com/rings Please let us know where you can set where we
1:58:50
can send the ring to and the sealing wax which will help you
1:58:53
seal your official correspondence. And of course we
1:58:56
have the certificate of authenticity again, Kurt, sir
1:59:00
single scholar, thank you very much for supporting the no
1:59:03
agenda show. No one
1:59:11
I love getting the pictures of the meetups. I hope people are
1:59:16
putting reports of the meetups on no agenda meetups.com I think
1:59:19
it's possible to do that. Because when you look at the
1:59:21
people you go, Why are these people all in the same group?
1:59:25
It's such a collect every single one of them very eclectic, very
1:59:29
different. Some really good looking groups, but just
1:59:32
different and if you feel sometimes you're different. Go
1:59:34
find your community at a no agenda meetup such as the one in
1:59:37
Los Banos, California sir Robertson has
1:59:39
two sticks here at the Las Vegas meetup back in the morning. In
1:59:44
Aptos, California. John, we're in the bathrooms where are you?
1:59:47
This is Alexa from Aptos California. Hey, John.
1:59:52
This is George from Turlock. I am not douchebag Oh, wait. Yeah,
1:59:56
my wife says I am yeah.
1:59:57
This Jim from Merced via Georgia. This is David from
2:00:01
Sherlock. Drink your milk. Hey John and Adam does LCDC from Los
2:00:07
Banos need up. We
2:00:10
talk here having a great time in Las Vegas at this meetup
2:00:15
and one meetup report from Park farm winery, Durango and Iowa
2:00:19
where they had a meet up in the morning Adam and John no cheesy
2:00:21
one liners, no background music, no
2:00:23
terrible jokes.
2:00:24
Just pure fun here at the park farm winery in Durango, Iowa.
2:00:28
Hey, this is Rob at the Durango meet up with my smokin hot wife
2:00:32
seven huge resources in the morning. Thank you for your
2:00:35
courage in the morning sort of mountain bandsaw in the mornings
2:00:39
or any metal
2:00:41
in the afternoon Brad from upwards in the morning was from
2:00:44
to be as close as 11am in the morning. We're at the winery
2:00:48
near Dubuque, Iowa to meet up and I've got Kara with me.
2:00:52
This is Darrell in the morning. And we're having fun out here
2:00:55
today. In the morning here Durango, Iowa Daniel out of
2:00:59
Chicago in the morning and this is Taylor Adam do wa TP
2:01:03
and I'm your host Tim
2:01:05
a great turnout tonight to resources I love that I wanted
2:01:14
to play it it was very difficult to hear next time I recommend
2:01:17
taking the iPhone out of the sock that would probably work a
2:01:20
little bit better. But I love the at the end. Thank you for
2:01:23
your courage. That was good. meet ups coming up. Friday must
2:01:26
be high number seven the meet up and after play seven o'clock at
2:01:29
McSorley's wonderful saloon and Grill in Toronto Ontario,
2:01:33
Canada. Navia. And the next show day Sunday vivid Iceland and no
2:01:37
agenda downtown meet up seven o'clock Lebowski bar in
2:01:39
Reykjavik Iceland. Yeah, they've had some successful meetups
2:01:43
there. That'd be great coming up. We have Elk Grove,
2:01:48
California, January 30. Make sure you check that out if
2:01:51
you're in the area. We have Denver, Colorado we have another
2:01:55
meetup in Cairo in Egypt on the second Waxahachie, Texas Mount
2:02:01
Laurel Township, New Jersey, Norwood, Massachusetts Palmer,
2:02:04
Alaska, Utrecht, the Netherlands, Augustine or Keller
2:02:07
mention were bad when nationwide were global baby Portsmouth, New
2:02:12
Hampshire Alexandria, Virginia, Edmond, Oklahoma, Austin Sunset
2:02:17
Valley, Texas. That's interesting. San Diego
2:02:21
California star Idaho San Antonio, Texas Philadelphia,
2:02:25
Pennsylvania Denver, Colorado, Charlotte North Carolina
2:02:27
Cincinnati, Ohio Gladewater Texas, Toronto in Canada,
2:02:31
Ontario, Canada Derby and Connecticut Smithfield Texas and
2:02:35
Charlotte North Carolina and that just takes us through March
2:02:37
16. If you want to find more go to no agenda meetups.com If you
2:02:41
can't find one near you then you should start one yourself it's
2:02:44
easy and guaranteed always a party
2:02:49
with a nice day you will be triggered you will be buddy
2:03:01
feels Yeah, I should mention that last banjos no actually
2:03:10
can't be is pronounced two ways the most California cities you
2:03:14
have one pronunciation except unless you're trying to
2:03:16
exaggerate things San Jose. But it is less bad news and last
2:03:21
banjos
2:03:22
oh I'm glad it I'm glad we
2:03:29
you learned something on the show.
2:03:30
You got a lot on the show, actually. Alright, I have I have
2:03:33
a lot of ISOs for some reason. You want me to play mine first?
2:03:37
Well, you how many do you have? 123456.
2:03:42
Wow. Wow. Okay,
2:03:47
you want to play first? Or should I play mine first?
2:03:50
Yes, play yours first and see what you got. I've waited so
2:03:53
long for somebody to do that.
2:03:55
Little long actually. Let me see. I gotta jack this one up in
2:04:00
the war
2:04:01
and peace of ISOs
2:04:02
that was definitely the war and peace of ISIS. Let's try this
2:04:06
one then.
2:04:07
This is like crack. That's a good one. If
2:04:11
you like that one. Well, the short answer is science. Too
2:04:14
much music?
2:04:15
No. Podcasting is pirate radio.
2:04:19
No, try this one. How stupid are we? Too long really? And the
2:04:25
last one is this treason? I think that's Bovard Yes, I like
2:04:31
this one. This
2:04:31
is like crack I think okay, that's I think it's competitive.
2:04:35
I think it's up to you. I
2:04:37
mean it you have some you have competition. Okay,
2:04:40
let's go with start to top Murder. Murder. Murder murder.
2:04:46
Nope. I guess get no chance. No, but this Thank you.
2:04:49
Thank you for having me. Not bad, not bad, not bad number.
2:04:55
And who knew? Who knew?
2:04:58
I think it's kind of a tall What's up? Let me see. Well,
2:05:02
we'll play on both and let's see, it's a toss up between
2:05:05
Thank you for having me.
2:05:06
This is like crack.
2:05:09
I think the crack wins. But both of them. No, no, no, no, no,
2:05:14
that that makes it entirely too long.
2:05:17
Okay. And although Thank you for having me, I may resubmit.
2:05:23
We have a couple of things. Where are we? Oh, we got plenty
2:05:25
of time. That's right. Everybody has time for tank talk on the no
2:05:31
agenda show.
2:05:33
I'm glad we got to jingles. Thank
2:05:35
you, Steve Jones. I kind of like my play it again. I'm liking it.
2:05:37
Welcome. I see you have a couple of tank top clips if I may.
2:05:46
Maybe I should just get started here. And she I think this might
2:05:54
be an interesting one. This one How about Martha Raddatz out
2:05:58
of the war in Ukraine. And tonight news from President
2:06:00
Biden significant new support for Ukraine in the form of
2:06:04
Abrams tanks being sent to help them fight back against the
2:06:07
Russians. The US will send 31 Abrams tanks to Ukraine. Today,
2:06:11
Germany and other NATO Allies now saying they will send
2:06:14
leopard tanks as well. Those things could get there even
2:06:16
sooner. Our chief global affairs correspondent Martha Raddatz
2:06:19
tonight on why this is so significant, as Ukraine's
2:06:22
defense minister says these tanks will be an iron fist
2:06:25
against Russian lines.
2:06:28
Tonight with the war in Ukraine about to enter its second year,
2:06:32
the Russians now braced to face a fiercer Ukrainian foe, armed
2:06:37
with sophisticated battle tanks with greater firepower greater
2:06:41
lethality.
2:06:42
Abrams tanks are the most capable tanks in the world and
2:06:45
will enhance the Ukraine's capacity to defend his territory
2:06:49
to achieve strategic objectives.
2:06:51
President Biden announcing the US will send 31 Abrams tanks,
2:06:56
and the Germans are releasing 14 of their leopard tanks. With up
2:07:00
to 60 more leopards sent from other European countries. The
2:07:05
Pentagon had been reluctant to send American tanks because they
2:07:09
are expensive, complex and hard to operate. But the offer was
2:07:14
finally made today in part to give Germany political cover
2:07:18
during enforcement a change. We want to make sure we're all
2:07:21
together. So we're going to do all that we're doing right now.
2:07:25
The German tanks should begin arriving within weeks the Abrams
2:07:28
could take up to a year since the US is building new ones for
2:07:32
the Ukrainians not taking them from the US stockpile. President
2:07:37
Solinsky had requested 300 tanks, but today tweeted his
2:07:42
thanks to President Biden calling it another powerful
2:07:45
decision and an important step on the path to victory. As for
2:07:50
those Abrams tanks, they are faster have precision fire and
2:07:55
are far superior to most of the Soviet era tanks the Russians
2:07:59
are using.
2:08:01
That's a couple of things. That's the baseline there I
2:08:03
guess. Yeah, a
2:08:04
couple of things. And there was a new piece of information in
2:08:09
there but a couple of things. One is that I'm surprised they
2:08:11
used iron fist because because of as Alinsky also said, my
2:08:18
favorite line which was a fist of tanks. Yes, finger fist of
2:08:28
tanks and
2:08:29
stuff. Thanks. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank
2:08:33
you.
2:08:34
I'll say I would just this whole thing's a fiasco what
2:08:36
he said thanks, but it came out tanks.
2:08:40
So here is the Hold on a second. All right, this makes me feel
2:08:48
better. So here's Kirby on PVH barbicide not PBS. But NPR. This
2:08:55
is on NPR Says the
2:08:56
guy who was the spokes hole for the Pentagon and now he's kind
2:09:01
of a general.
2:09:03
I mean, he's disposable for the National Security Council.
2:09:06
Right. But
2:09:06
he does a lot of this from the podium.
2:09:09
Yeah, because he's like the guy they're trying to get rid of
2:09:12
this other woman but you know, they don't want to look racist.
2:09:15
And you know, practicing white supremacy by putting this guy up
2:09:19
there all the time. Why they her out, so they can't do that. So
2:09:23
here he is, talking with an interview on NPR, trying to
2:09:27
explain the whole thing and he is a Flim Flam guy. He never
2:09:30
really answered his questions. He's full of shit. This guy
2:09:34
these should be ashamed of himself as a Navy officer, but
2:09:37
especially an admiral but here we go. And the real question is
2:09:42
why last week, there was no chance of them getting tanks.
2:09:46
Now. We had tanks what happened?
2:09:48
It's official American tanks are headed to Ukraine. The US is
2:09:52
sending 31 Abrams tanks a move designed to help Ukraine defend
2:09:57
its territory and also designed to send A message to Russia, the
2:10:01
US and its allies are committed to the fight. The expectation
2:10:05
on the part of Russia is we're going to break up. We're not
2:10:08
going to stay united. But we are fully thoroughly totally United
2:10:12
President Biden announcing the move today at the White House,
2:10:15
which is where we now find John Kirby, the President's spokesman
2:10:18
on the National Security Council. He joins us live John
2:10:21
Kirby. Welcome back.
2:10:22
Thank you so much, Mary. Louise, good to be with you.
2:10:25
Good to have you with us. Ukraine, as you know, has been
2:10:29
calling for tanks all through this war, the US resisted and
2:10:31
resisted and resisted Weisen them now. Well, we never
2:10:35
took tanks off the table. And tanks, frankly, have been in
2:10:40
discussion for months. But this was a discussion that we had not
2:10:44
only with the Ukrainians, but with our allies and partners.
2:10:47
And we want to make sure with every system we send, that we're
2:10:50
sending systems appropriate to the fight that the Ukrainians
2:10:53
are in, in the fight that we think they're going to be in the
2:10:55
coming weeks and months. And this decision today is really,
2:10:58
you've got to take a couple of steps back and look at it in the
2:11:00
context of the Combined Arms training that we're doing with
2:11:03
Ukrainian battalions right now outside the country, they
2:11:07
believe and we believe they're right to believe that in the
2:11:10
spring in the summer months, that they are they're going to
2:11:13
face Russia coming back in an offensive way and that they want
2:11:18
to be able to conduct offensive operations of their own and they
2:11:21
want to do it in a combined arms fashion, which means you need to
2:11:24
maneuver in open terrain and on vast parts of ground and that
2:11:28
means you need armored capabilities like the Bradley's
2:11:31
and the strikers we sent and then of course includes tanks.
2:11:33
So this decision was really the culmination of weeks of
2:11:36
diplomatic conversations about how do we help Ukraine in the
2:11:40
fight that we expect them to be in when the winter fades and
2:11:44
spring and summer months come?
2:11:46
The fighting season is back.
2:11:50
So that's uh, you know, he did question was last week you said
2:11:55
no way tanks. Yeah. And now it could so he just goes on and on
2:11:59
and on. He's really good at this by the way. Yeah, he's gonna be
2:12:02
a much better guy from the real podium if they get rid of John
2:12:06
Pierre clan Damn.
2:12:09
Karina Karina, Sean Pierre VanDamme.
2:12:12
Yeah. All right. Onward.
2:12:14
But on the Abram specifically the Pentagon's top policy guy
2:12:19
this is Colin Cole told reporters just last week that
2:12:22
the US was not going to send a I'm sorry,
2:12:25
what is what kind of role are you as the Pentagon's top policy
2:12:29
guy? What does that even mean?
2:12:32
It means you're getting my big check for doing nothing okay.
2:12:35
But on the Abram specifically the Pentagon is top policy guy
2:12:40
this is Colin Cole told reporters just last week that
2:12:43
the US was not going to send Abrams to Ukraine because
2:12:46
they're too hard to maintain. He said and I quote, the Abrams
2:12:49
tank is a very complicated piece of equipment. It's expensive.
2:12:52
It's hard to train on, John Kirby, are these things no
2:12:56
longer true? All those things are still true. Mary Louise,
2:12:59
John Kirby, Mary Louise, John Kirby, Mary Louise, John Kirby,
2:13:02
Mary Louise, John Kirby and Mary Louise, what
2:13:05
are you doing here?
2:13:05
And we have been nothing but open and transparent. Certainly
2:13:08
the Pentagon has been about certain challenges with having,
2:13:13
you know, a foreign military operate and train and maintain
2:13:17
Abrams tanks. But there are other countries that that have
2:13:20
purchased Abrams tanks and are able to operate them. And so
2:13:24
we're confident that the Ukrainians can get there. I
2:13:26
don't think so. But the difference is, Ukraine is at
2:13:30
war, when they are in the midst of an invasion by a hostile
2:13:34
neighboring power, and they are losing civilians and troops
2:13:38
every day. So we need to make sure that we tailor the delivery
2:13:41
of Ukraine's in a way I'm sorry, Abrams, what in any part that we
2:13:49
deliver that, that we tailor the delivery of Abrams tanks in a
2:13:53
way that the Ukrainians can absorb it effectively. So that's
2:13:56
why we're going to start with this potato and that's why it's
2:13:58
going to take many months for them to get there. But we're not
2:14:00
going to waste time Mary Louise, we're going to train those
2:14:02
troops. We're going to help them put in a supply chain process so
2:14:05
that they have the parts and supplies and the technical
2:14:07
ability to repair these runs. Great, thanks. Yeah.
2:14:12
It was very confusing. What What was your your edits and what was
2:14:15
just
2:14:15
oh, they keep going? He keeps his she keeps calling him John
2:14:18
Kirby constantly and Mary Louise. Okay, back and forth.
2:14:24
Hi, well, Adam curry the way I see it is, oh, what do you think
2:14:27
John C. Dvorak?
2:14:28
Well, what I mean, it's what I think John C. Dvorak is at colon
2:14:31
cow. Kal is a very evil looking douchebag. From the Pentagon.
2:14:38
Did you look him up? Yeah. What did you do? What's he do for a
2:14:41
living?
2:14:42
Well, he is officially the Undersecretary of Defense for
2:14:45
Policy. But he went up during this while he's a Harvard
2:14:50
University Council on Foreign Relations, blah, blah, blah. But
2:14:54
he was the Iran deal guy.
2:14:57
Well, the way I see it, the Pentagon Saying one thing Herbie
2:15:02
in the White House, they're thinking something else and
2:15:05
there was a content. What she's trying to do is get him to say,
2:15:08
hey, there's a screw up here, right?
2:15:10
Yes,
2:15:12
he would. He wouldn't do it now and honestly what we said
2:15:16
planned all along. So, and then he's you know, stammering to
2:15:23
which gives the ATO what he's really, she's pretty good
2:15:26
actually this woman, Mary Louise or whatever the woman and so she
2:15:32
she's pretty good at pushing at least trying to get the question
2:15:35
as twice minimally. Let's go to clip three
2:15:38
now it's not just Abrams that are headed to Ukraine. This
2:15:41
announcement was made in tandem with Germany announcing they're
2:15:44
gonna send leopard tanks was the announcement time to give
2:15:48
Germany cover.
2:15:50
This was a very coordinated announcement by both the United
2:15:54
States and Germany. I mean, we we've been talking to our German
2:15:57
counterparts now for many weeks. Tanks have been certainly on the
2:16:01
agenda. They were on Friday when Secretary Austin was in Ramstein
2:16:04
on the Ukraine contact group. And today's announcement was
2:16:07
very much coordinated with with the Germans as as it should be,
2:16:11
as the President said, we are are united we want to certainly
2:16:15
appear as though we are united because again, that's really
2:16:18
important too.
2:16:21
That's pretty funny. We want at least one at least appear to be
2:16:25
united. That's important to want
2:16:27
to certainly appear as though we are united because again, that's
2:16:30
really important too. Yeah,
2:16:31
fakery is phony
2:16:34
Kirby. Wait, that was Kirby was a truth coming out?
2:16:39
Yes, of course, of course. And she goes on. Yeah. But she knows
2:16:43
she knows his his horse craft coordinated
2:16:46
with with the Germans as as it should be, as the President
2:16:49
said, we are our united, we want to certainly appear as though we
2:16:53
are united. Because again, that's really important to
2:16:56
know. President Biden went out of his way not to threaten
2:17:00
Russia today. He stressed this is about helping Ukraine defend
2:17:03
its own territory. He said, it's not an offensive threat to
2:17:06
Russia, there is no offensive threat to Russia. Can you
2:17:10
elaborate on the messaging going on there? We have
2:17:12
been from the very beginning. Not interested in having this
2:17:19
war in Ukraine escalate to make it what Putin claims it is a war
2:17:23
of US versus Russia. It's not. And we don't want to see the war
2:17:28
escalate to that level, that wouldn't be good for us. Russia
2:17:31
certainly wouldn't be good for Ukraine. So the President's
2:17:34
comments today were entirely consistent with how he has
2:17:37
talked about this war from the very beginning idiots and the
2:17:42
Russian propaganda today, you know, they're out there saying
2:17:46
that these tanks are an escalation that they're an
2:17:48
offensive threat. And the President wanted to get ahead of
2:17:50
that and make it clear that they're not now look very loose,
2:17:53
very loose. They are absolutely a threat to Russian forces
2:17:57
inside Ukraine. They need to know that they need to
2:17:59
understand that these are very capable tanks.
2:18:02
Oh, man, he's he's fought. She's not having it. And it's actually
2:18:05
pretty impressive. Yeah. I mean, she's not getting anywhere. But
2:18:09
she,
2:18:09
uh, West. She's a West German woman.
2:18:11
Ah, so that's why she has a problem with that.
2:18:14
I looked it up. Cuz I said, I kept saying she SS. It's not
2:18:19
really an accent. But her presentation style is just, it's
2:18:24
got a little something with her voice. And I'm thinking who is
2:18:26
this? So I looked her up. And she is for out originally from
2:18:30
West Germany.
2:18:31
I have some German clips where we can check that in a minute.
2:18:34
So let's go with the I think this is the last one. But that's
2:18:37
my
2:18:38
that's my last question. In the few seconds we have left, I
2:18:40
think a game changer, just the White House expect these us
2:18:43
tanks to be
2:18:44
what we do, do you think will be a significant enhanced
2:18:48
capability for Ukraine is all the armored capability, you've
2:18:51
got to keep it in context of everything that's being given to
2:18:54
Ukraine here for their combined arms operations. Right. And the
2:18:57
tanks are a part of that they are significant, they will have
2:19:00
a significant impact. And that's why quite frankly, we gave them
2:19:03
the equivalent of one Ukrainian battalion so that it wasn't a
2:19:06
symbolic gesture, it was actually have operational
2:19:09
impact.
2:19:10
Okay, okay. She says, Well, this is very interesting. Here's the
2:19:16
German Foreign Minister, telling us exactly who this war really
2:19:21
is against and between who, and therefore I should mention, this
2:19:25
German foreign minister. She lied about her credentials. He
2:19:30
had to give her diploma back. She's very young. You just you
2:19:33
just look at it like, oh, man, I just don't like you. It's one of
2:19:37
those faces.
2:19:38
So she's one of those people that wormed her way into Office
2:19:41
somehow.
2:19:42
Yeah, not hard at all. Now, also know that I think we talked
2:19:46
about the debt, the people who are running in the German
2:19:50
cabinet, there really are a bunch of losers. You know, the,
2:19:56
the defense minister, she had to leave the recall because she
2:20:00
were high heels or whatever. They're just trying to get rid
2:20:03
of people anyway they can. So she's still in your she is in
2:20:06
the European Parliament, and therefore
2:20:08
I've said already in the last days, yes, we have to do more to
2:20:12
defend Ukraine. Yes, we have to do more also on text. But the
2:20:17
most important and the crucial part is that we do it together
2:20:22
and that we do not do the blame game in Europe, because we are
2:20:26
fighting a war against Russia and not against each other.
2:20:31
Thank you. Oh, okay. Thank you, Madam
2:20:34
Minister. So not Ukraine against Russia. We are fighting Russia.
2:20:38
Thank you, Foreign Minister. That's really great. Now let's
2:20:42
go take a
2:20:42
look ruse up to messaging here is Deutsche
2:20:44
Avella, German news television. With a little introduction of a
2:20:51
longer report about the state of the German military. Germany's
2:20:55
military is short of money, equipment and stuff. And it has
2:20:59
been for years to goondas regularly hits the headlines
2:21:03
with embarrassing stories. radio equipment from the 80s a mass
2:21:08
breakdown of Houma vehicles, lack of basic underwear and
2:21:12
waterproof jackets and training not with machine guns but
2:21:15
broomsticks. So when Russia invaded Ukraine in February
2:21:18
2022, the inspector of the German Army issued a stark
2:21:22
warning, the Bundeswehr the army that I have a duty to lead is
2:21:26
standing there more or less empty handed. It was a wake up
2:21:31
call, the invasion sparked a massive policy shift. With a war
2:21:35
on European soil, Germany's military suddenly became a
2:21:38
priority.
2:21:40
So they had no underwear. That seems pretty basic for your
2:21:46
fighting force. And instead of training with machine guns, I
2:21:50
use broomsticks. And this is actually doing this in front of
2:21:55
the I guess the Air Force and these planes are all decrepit,
2:21:59
and look like crap. I'm sure it's some internal programming
2:22:03
that's going on for for the Germans. But this is all very,
2:22:07
very odd what's taking place now I have two messages from
2:22:12
military people who I know personally, who are not in
2:22:17
Ukraine, but in surrounding European states, such as Poland
2:22:23
will be one. And as this is not really reported on but there are
2:22:29
many mercs in Ukraine, fighting mercenaries, US mercenaries. My,
2:22:36
my signal timeline is just filled every day. Oh, this
2:22:39
here's this mercenary got killed God kill got killed. And now the
2:22:44
mercenaries guys, predominately guys, there's some women who
2:22:49
will go anywhere to kill for money. Pretty much. They are
2:22:53
stopping. They are leaving because they say Ukraine is
2:22:57
losing the corruption is out of control tanks will not help you
2:23:02
Ukraine. They are running out of experienced fighters. Now the
2:23:07
second message I got this is very interesting.
2:23:10
This is from a guy in Poland. The first one yes. Okay.
2:23:15
Second one,
2:23:16
and the polish that Polish mail you is really anti Russian. And
2:23:23
it would be so it'd be tilted a little bit into it would
2:23:27
domestic I don't know what it what that means?
2:23:30
Well, let me put it this way. He's not a European now. So
2:23:33
there's mercenaries there. Let me just repeat that. Here's
2:23:38
here's another one. Just a little cryptic, but I'll just
2:23:40
read it. Russia is about to buy all the US gear left behind in
2:23:44
Afghanistan. Russia will recognize the Taliban will
2:23:48
replace us gear with Russian made gear. This will include the
2:23:52
latest US night vision goggles, M rap helicopters, etc. Afghan
2:23:58
soldiers trained by the US left behind Afghanistan are fighting
2:24:04
on the Russian side against Ukraine as well.
2:24:07
This was an article in the sun that went on about that $80
2:24:12
billion were the gear that we left behind or by us make it
2:24:16
just be straightforward. Biden, Biden left behind $80 billion in